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Searching For The "Perfect" Mailbox

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  • Searching For The "Perfect" Mailbox

    After years and years of mailbox catastrophes, I decided to build the "perfect" mailbox. My criteria was to build a box that:
    - has a frame that will withstand attacks from kids with bats, snow plows & drunks - the box is made of 3/16 plate
    - must rotate so snow plow won't tear off box - see kick shoe on back of post mount
    - is big enough to handle large packages or accumulation of mail for extended period
    - has height adjustment to make mail delivery guy happy - see adjustment on post that can be move to fit car or truck window height
    - has a positive door latching mechanism - I used high strength, adjustable magnet
    - has a way of moving mail that is shoved to back so it is easily accessible - see pull out slide to move mail forward towards door
    - minimizes water entry (using false flooring & overhang on door) - the floor offset from bottom about 3/4"
    - has a substantial flag that won't flop around - used tension washers to place friction on the arm and position restrains on arm in up & down position
    - and cannot be easily stolen.
    Here are the photos of the mail box finally in place. I don't know exactly what the box weighs, it took two of us to mount it. I drove the 4" post about 4 feet into the ground with our post pounder. The box is very slightly tilted to the front to assure water drainage. So far the box hasn't suffered any attacks, but I'm waiting to see what kind of damage a car or truck will get when they hit this thing. At this point I wouldn't say this is the "Perfect" mailbox, but it's getting close. I'm still working on a door locking mechanism that is acceptable to the mail delivery guy. And I'm thinking of putting a small LED light inside the box so I can see what's in there at night. My wife thinks I'm crazy for noodling around with this thing so much... but, that's what happens when you retire and have a Miller Mig Welder (I love my 251!).
    Attached Files
    Last edited by MTBob; 01-21-2009, 04:33 PM.

  • #2
    Looks good but not perfect. If it was perfect...it wouldn't accept any bills.

    Comment


    • #3
      "Mailboxes, Etc.........."

      MTBob: That turned out great! You put a lot of thought and planning into your design. Hopefully, no one will "try it out." Nice pictures, Colorado? Got to be out west, the sky's too blue!

      Dave in Phoenix

      Comment


      • #4
        Dang, I knew I forgot something... the bill eliminator. When I get that design feature worked out, I'll be quick to share it with everyone.
        Yup, we're about 80 miles north of Yellowstone Park, near Bozeman.

        Comment


        • #5
          "Big Sky Country"

          Beautiful part of America! Anyone who has ever lived out West knows what I mean by "Blue Skies." Looks like we've got another round of storms headed in by week's end. Washington really got hit last month! Be safe, stay warm!

          Dave

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          • #6
            As far as a light is concerned get some rechargable D cell bateries and conect them to a small solar panel and make a switch that comes on when you open the door. You can never have too much fun with any high quality tool such as a Miller MIG.

            Comment


            • #7
              Looks great, I would love to see the kids face that hits it with a baseball bat

              Seeing how I plow roads I would like to offer you a suggestion though, with mailboxes being so close to the road and especially being a dark color and so heavy, you may want to put some reflective tape on it. Plowing at night, dark objects are hard to see, I have hit a few myself in the past 31 years, one spun around like a top.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by KBar View Post
                Looks great, I would love to see the kids face that hits it with a baseball bat

                Seeing how I plow roads I would like to offer you a suggestion though, with mailboxes being so close to the road and especially being a dark color and so heavy, you may want to put some reflective tape on it. Plowing at night, dark objects are hard to see, I have hit a few myself in the past 31 years, one spun around like a top.
                That's a great idea about reflective tape or reflectors. We've got some mountain passes where the road reflectors are 4' tall because of the snow drifts in Northern Arizona. Believe me, when the cross winds are 50+ mph, and the snow is blowing, they come in real handy! Anybody been to Sunrise Sky Area on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation in the White Mountains knows of what I speak.

                Dave

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by KBar View Post
                  Looks great, I would love to see the kids face that hits it with a baseball bat

                  Seeing how I plow roads I would like to offer you a suggestion though, with mailboxes being so close to the road and especially being a dark color and so heavy, you may want to put some reflective tape on it. Plowing at night, dark objects are hard to see, I have hit a few myself in the past 31 years, one spun around like a top.
                  That is a great idea, I'll look for the reflective tape, makes lots of sense. As an alternative I could install side lights powered with solar panels & batteries and a light sensor so they come on when the sun goes down. ... or, I could stay with the tape...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by metalmeltr View Post
                    As far as a light is concerned get some rechargable D cell bateries and conect them to a small solar panel and make a switch that comes on when you open the door. You can never have too much fun with any high quality tool such as a Miller MIG.
                    Yup, all work revolves around my MM251, if it can't be welded, it ain't worth doing.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Great job!!!
                      And it is bullet proof, somewhat.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by redintn View Post
                        Great job!!!
                        And it is bullet proof, somewhat.
                        Redintn: Them's fight'in words. In fact that's one of my worries, I suspect that to some this beast looks like a target, not a mail box. I'm guessing the side walls are OK up to about a .30 caliber... and, I'd bet that some SOB is going to test it. On the other hand, that's where a MM251 comes in handy... fixing bullet holes.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have knocked down my share of boxes in the past.
                          Now that I am a home owner I have lost a few, I dont b@#$ch to much.
                          Pay back I recen.
                          My brother picked on one for a few weekends, kept pulling it up with a truck.
                          Left it alone for a few weeks, went to pull it up one night.
                          The owner had dug a hole 3' x 3' drove in "T" fence posts (5 or 6) and filled the hole with concrete. Well the owner never out one back up after it got pulled.
                          Wonder why we aint jail?
                          Any way, I would not mess with one now.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I share your problems

                            I to have had problems with Mail box destruction. I lived in my house for eight years before my mail box was destroyed. Now it is maid all out of 3/16" steel The box lasted for 4 years until one day the hinges on one side was destroyed. I just brought it to the shop and reworked the hinges and put it out for more fun. I like your box and hop it makes it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Great Mailbox!

                              Great Job, MTB!
                              A suggestion: form the reflective tape to show your house number. That'll help out first time visitors at night.
                              For people like Jeff and the .30cal bandits, a claymore tripwired to the post and some reactive tank armor would be good

                              DrBob

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