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Casters for table?

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  • Casters for table?

    Whats the best and worst casters to put under my table legs? Steel, poly, rubber, air or hard?

    Im building 3 tables and want them all the same height and capacity. Saw some today at Harbor Freight that looked like good wheels but cheesy brackets.

    Help me out. I only want to do this once.

    Thanks

  • #2
    The rolling surface of the wheel - Steel or Poly - depends on the specifics of your application.

    I would stay away from pneumatic tires as they are not really designed for this application, and will lose air "sitting" which will alter stability and height.

    Best of luck.

    Comment


    • #3
      Probably hard surface like garage or driveway. I didnt like the idea of air tires due to hot metal ***** rolling around on the floor. I also dont want my table to "bounce" when Im wailing away with a hammer doing destructive testing....

      Comment


      • #4
        I like hard rubber casters.
        They roll over small debris better than steel.
        Also the larger the better, easier to roll.

        Casters on sale -

        http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...0&N=762991+120

        Comment


        • #5
          Oh yeah -

          Check Enco monthly sales flyer.

          Usually FREE shipping > $50. with code.

          Comment


          • #6
            A summary of my experience:

            Pneumatic will go flat eventually. Murphy suggests it will be flat when you want to move it

            Steel will hold the most weight, will not flat spot, requires a clean rolling surface.

            Non-steel has "anti steel" properties. They usually hold less weight - but may hold "enough" weight for your application. They may flat spot but that depends on what kind of caster material and how much weight they are holding up. And because they are "softer" than steel are more tollerant of stuff on the rolling surface.

            As large a diameter as practical.

            In general I have found steel to have the most load capacity per caster dollar and use the "clean rolling surface" as an incentive to clean up the floor more often than I would without the incentive.

            An alternative design I have used is casters as "transportation only" and have adjustable pads that I lower when I get the table to where I am going. That way the table legs can be adjusted to take into account the variances of the floor and my need to make the table level or the same height as something else. It seems to provide a more stable platform than a table on wheels - even with good wheel brakes. And given that the wheels are simply for movement allows me to use a type that I would not have choosen if they were the primary table support.
            Last edited by arvidj; 01-04-2009, 09:23 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by arvidj View Post
              A summary of my experience:

              Pneumatic will go flat eventually. Murphy suggests it will be flat when you want to move it

              Steel will hold the most weight, will not flat spot, requires a clean rolling surface.

              Non-steel has "anti steel" properties. They usually hold less weight - but may hold "enough" weight for your application. They may flat spot but that depends on what kind of caster material and how much weight they are holding up. And because they are "softer" than steel are more tollerant of stuff on the rolling surface.

              As large a diameter as practical.

              In general I have found steel to have the most load capacity per caster dollar and use the "clean rolling surface" as an incentive to clean up the floor more often than I would without the incentive.

              An alternative design I have used is casters as "transportation only" and have adjustable pads that I lower when I get the table to where I am going. That way the table legs can be adjusted to take into account the variances of the floor and my need to make the table level or the same height as something else. It seems to provide a more stable platform than a table on wheels - even with good wheel brakes. And given that the wheels are simply for movement allows me to use a type that I would not have choosen if they were the primary table support.
              I agree, I have 4 1000 lb steel catsers from northern, 15 bucks ea at the time and only use them for tranport. The table is supported by 4 1" bolts with 4" plates. It weighs 2000+ lbs empty so I was worried about anything but steel wheels... Plus being able to level it anywhere is great.

              Comment


              • #8
                My table wont weigh anywhere near a ton. Ive thought about moving it like a wheel barrow with fixed casters only on one end and pull out handles.

                Ive decided on 3 tables. 2, 2X2 and one 2X4 all the same height to make holders for long pipe etc.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My table is kinda small, 2' X 4' but rather than put wheels on mine. I just use the pallet jack to move it around. However I did make plow dollys to move our plows around the shop on a concrete floor. I used 4 - 750lb rated polyurethane over steel wheels, 4" x 2" for each dolly. The plows weigh a little over a ton and the wheels work perfect. They will go over fine dirt but if there is a lot of debris, it needs to be cleaned up.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Pic's of table caster setup ?

                    Originally posted by arvidj View Post
                    A summary of my experience:

                    Pneumatic will go flat eventually. Murphy suggests it will be flat when you want to move it

                    Steel will hold the most weight, will not flat spot, requires a clean rolling surface.

                    Non-steel has "anti steel" properties. They usually hold less weight - but may hold "enough" weight for your application. They may flat spot but that depends on what kind of caster material and how much weight they are holding up. And because they are "softer" than steel are more tollerant of stuff on the rolling surface.

                    As large a diameter as practical.

                    In general I have found steel to have the most load capacity per caster dollar and use the "clean rolling surface" as an incentive to clean up the floor more often than I would without the incentive.

                    An alternative design I have used is casters as "transportation only" and have adjustable pads that I lower when I get the table to where I am going. That way the table legs can be adjusted to take into account the variances of the floor and my need to make the table level or the same height as something else. It seems to provide a more stable platform than a table on wheels - even with good wheel brakes. And given that the wheels are simply for movement allows me to use a type that I would not have choosen if they were the primary table support.
                    ARVIDJ, is there any way you could post pics of your table casters, it sounds like the perfect solution but I'm having a hard time picturing it ? Thanks

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a lot of experience wheeling around "dead weight."

                      I can attest that the best casters for anything in the shop are medical casters like the ones on hospital gurneys. They are made to handle a lot of "dead weight" and are extremely solid and smooth rolling.

                      Imagine the daily routine of a caster on an ambulance stretcher...

                      Pick up 500lb man and roll through 50' of front lawn onto the gravel driveway... Unload at the asphalt parking lot at the hospital. Roll over the threshold smoothly. Roll smoothly into the ER. Get a little bleach splashed on you. Repeat 10-15X daily for 5 or 10 years before you are replaced. Oh, and expect a half million dollar lawsuit if one ever breaks.

                      These things are STRONG.

                      http://www.humphriescasters.com/catalog/bedCasters.pdf
                      Last edited by Bodybagger; 01-31-2009, 04:07 PM.

                      Comment

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