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  • #16
    Originally posted by IRONWORKER View Post
    I Have Tryed Tungsten Out In The Feld And At Work And Home There Is A Big Differents On All Of Them Do To The Power Sorce And For Aluminum On A Inverter The Green Tungsten Works Good
    Green tungsten (pure tungsten) is not recommended for the Dynasty (or for inverters in general). I know that some people say that it is okay, but all of the literature specifically says not to use pure tungsten.

    I started out using 2% ceriated (orange band) which worked great for mild steel, but would ball up quickly when doing aluminum. Lanthinated tungsten seems to keep its point better when working with AC (1.5% lanth. - yellow band, 2% lanth. - blue band).
    Dynasty 200DX
    MM252 w/ Spoolmatic 30A
    Spectrum 675

    Comment


    • #17
      Reference Help for Everyone,

      I read all the "recommendations" about tungsten selection/preparation and just sit back and shake my head. There's as much "bad advice" put out as there is "good advice". How's a newbie to tell the difference?

      I would suggest that anyone trying to learn to tig weld go to Diamond Ground Products website (www.diamondground.com) and download their "The Proper Selection & Preparation of Tungsten Electrodes for Arc Welding". Their guide is much more informative than much of the "internet hearsay".

      Additionally, I would recommend that anyone new to tig welding, acquire a copy (download or purchase) of Miller's Tig Handbook for GTAW. It's a very good guide, much more accurate than some of the "expert posters".

      Just my .02
      Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
      Dynasty 200 DX
      Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
      Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
      Hobart HH187
      Dialarc 250 AC/DC
      Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
      Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
      PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
      Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
      Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
      More grinders than hands

      Comment


      • #18
        Here are direct links for the documents that Sundown mentioned

        Miller GTAW Handbook (one PDF instead of multiple PDFs from the miller site)
        http://mookins.com/TIG%20Handbook.pdf

        The Proper Selection & Preparation of Tungsten Electrodes for Arc Welding
        http://www.diamondground.com/Guidebook0105.pdf

        I think that it would be prudent for the administrator of these Miller forums to have a "sticky" post with a title something like "Important Dynasty/Inverter tig information". This post would contain basic information about the proper tungsten type and preparation for use with the Dynasty. It seems that everytime a new user posts a question about the Dynasty invariabley someone post a reply about balling the tungsten or using pure tungsten.

        Just a though from a guy who probably shouldn't be giving advice...
        Dynasty 200DX
        MM252 w/ Spoolmatic 30A
        Spectrum 675

        Comment


        • #19
          Grumpy,

          Thanks for making things easier.

          Like you, I get very frustrated reading all the "bad advice" given on the board.

          Going back to one of my favorite expressions, "Better to remain silent and be thought the fool than open one's mouth and remove all doubt".

          This board can be a source of great information and I have learned a lot here. I have also seen a lot of bad information spouted as gospel.
          Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
          Dynasty 200 DX
          Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
          Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
          Hobart HH187
          Dialarc 250 AC/DC
          Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
          Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
          PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
          Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
          Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
          More grinders than hands

          Comment


          • #20
            Thanks For The Help

            Originally posted by grumpy42 View Post
            Green tungsten (pure tungsten) is not recommended for the Dynasty (or for inverters in general). I know that some people say that it is okay, but all of the literature specifically says not to use pure tungsten.

            I started out using 2% ceriated (orange band) which worked great for mild steel, but would ball up quickly when doing aluminum. Lanthinated tungsten seems to keep its point better when working with AC (1.5% lanth. - yellow band, 2% lanth. - blue band).
            I HAVE NOT USED ORANGE OR YELLOW BUT WE HAD SOME BLUE IN OUR SHOP BUT WE WERE WELDING ON STANLESS THANKS FOR THE HELP

            I WILL BE GOING TO ORDER THE RAINBOW OF TUNGSTEN SO I CAN SEE FIRST HAND IF THERE IS A BETTER TUNGSTEN THAN WHAT WE USE NOW

            AND THAT IS TRUE WHAT DO YOU DO ASK FOR HELP OR READ ALL THAT LITERATURE AND FORGET WHAT YOU READ

            THIS IS COOL I LEARNED SOMTHING FROM HERE " WELD ON "

            Comment


            • #21
              gumpy42....WHOOOAAA BOY!!! CALM DOWN!!!
              lmao....good you screamed, made me happy I didn't start tigging with my D200 yet Anyway, i would have read the manual and read the GTAW handbook before I started...Darn good advice for me
              Keep it coming....
              School has all Sync 350 transformer machines.....
              I'm not late...
              I'm just on Hawaiian Time

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by IRONWORKER View Post
                AND THAT IS TRUE WHAT DO YOU DO ASK FOR HELP OR READ ALL THAT LITERATURE AND FORGET WHAT YOU READ

                THIS IS COOL I LEARNED SOMTHING FROM HERE " WELD ON "
                The more you know on a subject the more you'll remember each time you touch that subject, allthough you think you forgot, the human mind is a complex thing and long term memory is just that -Long term. Read, talk, ask, watch, and try- don't rule out any learning tool, someday someone will introduce something to you and suddenly you'll remember what you had forgotten or as you learn each time you retouch a particular subject stuff from the past does play in (maybe you didn't fully someting understand the first time, but later as you grow and learn old stuff starts to make since and fall into place.
                Reading is good and the internet is a wonderfull tool for free reference material, Check it out we found "here" on the net and we read.
                Last edited by mwccwi; 07-20-2007, 11:39 AM. Reason: spelling more spelling
                Martin
                Welding Technician
                AWS Certified Welding Inspector
                AWS Certified Welding Educator
                ASNT ACCP Level II VT/GI/D
                www.linkedin.com/pub/martin-cramer/20/b36/940/

                Comment


                • #23
                  Another noob tig welder here.

                  I have a new Syncrowave 200 and like others on this thread have been doing a LOT of research. Transformer. Inverter. Square wave. Advanced square wave. And apparently those are two completely different animals. My tig welding with the 200 thus far has been confined to mild steel and stainless as I try to move out of the "mud dauber" phase. I must say that my first beads left a lot to be desired, and I must hold the record for sticking the tungsten in the puddle.

                  Where this thread is concerned, and my question. My research would seem to indicate that transformer machines (Syncrowave) are confined to using pure tungsten, balled, for aluminum. Inverters (Dynasty) - 1.5% lanthanated with a truncated point. BUT, I keep coming across threads or suggestions in some of the literature that would indicate using 1.5% lanthanated with a truncated point on aluminum with transformer machines. So, is anyone with a Syncrowave using pointed lanthanated on aluminum, or am I confined to pure tungsten balled when I get to aluminum? At the rate that I am progressing on mild steel, that will be awhile.

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