Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Airplane Propeller

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Airplane Propeller

    I had been looking for an airplane propeller for some time to hang up in my shop. One of my friends told me she knew where one was and that she would get it for me. I did not know that it would be bent. Any ideas how to straighten the prop? I thought about heat but I have never tried anything this big before. I was also concerned that aluminum of this size would dissipate heat rapidly. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Nick
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Send it to Alaska

    Man, I've seen props on operational aircraft up here that weren't much better than that one.

    Send it To Alaska.

    Jerry in Anchorage

    Comment


    • #3
      Hang it up bent. A good, used propeller hanging on the wall is cool. A bent propeller is cool, and has a story.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by spotsineyes View Post
        Hang it up bent. A good, used propeller hanging on the wall is cool. A bent propeller is cool, and has a story.
        Tell people that you were in the plane at 10,000 feet when you hit a duck.

        Comment


        • #5
          a really big duck. LOL

          Comment


          • #6
            As the Prop will not ever be in service again here is my take as I have repaired/ straightened a few rims and forward controls.

            You are definitely gonna need some heat and I recommend a nice oa set up with a rose bud.
            Heat that puppy to about 750 range and add a slow pressure to the bend. Not sure if a prop is hollow but if it is we are gonna have a issue and will need to sling/strap and pull the bend out.
            the key to success is use your common sense and take your time.
            Go slow and don't throw too much heat at it.

            The funny thing with aluminium is when you add the heat most of the bend will come out naturally. A little heat goes along way and I also use a raw hide hammer and it does wonders.

            Good Luck and give a shout if you need more help.
            Laurence

            Comment


            • #7
              Hang it up bent, it would be even more interesting if you found out the story behind it.
              But you always could make up your own!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                There is an aviation salvage yard in Phoenix AZ I used to deal with for unusual aluminum pieces. I do not recall the name, but google them and you'll find it. Contact them and ask this same question. An aviation salvage yard might be a good start, or contact the aviation museaum at the smithsonian as they are always doing restoration they may have an idea how to accomplish this with the least fatigue on the metal.

                Peace,\
                Paul

                Comment


                • #9
                  Cool Prop

                  In all the years I flew, never got a bent one, but maybe the pilot forgot to extend the gear

                  Anyway it looks cool like it is, the advice given on bending is good, but I have no idea how well it works.

                  Good Luck, let the forum know what you did..

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Heat sounds like the way to approach this project, but I will be cautious and call some of the experts mentioned, in order to avoid any problems. If you have any other ideas please let me know.
                    Thanks,
                    Nick

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Check with your local airport, ask about a prop shop.
                      Ask where they send their props. Shouldn't cost too much to have them do it as it won't be going on a airplane, if it was going to be put into service it would have to be balanced.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That'll take a lot of work to look like a good prop again. It does have some real character in its present state.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Most modern props are hollow, and some have a composite epoxy poured into the center for strehgth. You need to be really careful in doing that. Even the professionals at museums tend to just replace a prop in that condition. Find a manufacturer's name on it somewhere if at all possible and look them up, they can tell you about the construction technique used and give you the best probable method. My advice, as an aviation mechanic, is to either hang it bent, or remove the good blade and hang that alone. It will look as good, perhaps not as striking as the entire hub, but for your purpose, ****, anything is better than nothing right.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            not to try and steal the thread but we got an old wooden one hanging in my dinning room from when my granddaddy worked at sensenich propeller here in littiz, Pa. This one is when they still made wooden ones the make aluminum ones now. this one is not airworthy.

                            http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=16jg44&s=4

                            http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=2rhsbiq&s=4

                            http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=av4ytt&s=4
                            Last edited by migwelder05; 11-07-2008, 12:47 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by AM2Mastro View Post
                              Most modern props are hollow, and some have a composite epoxy poured into the center for strehgth. You need to be really careful in doing that. Even the professionals at museums tend to just replace a prop in that condition. Find a manufacturer's name on it somewhere if at all possible and look them up, they can tell you about the construction technique used and give you the best probable method. My advice, as an aviation mechanic, is to either hang it bent, or remove the good blade and hang that alone. It will look as good, perhaps not as striking as the entire hub, but for your purpose, ****, anything is better than nothing right.
                              Thanks for the advice. I was going to call a few folks before attempting to repair the prop. As for hanging the good blade...they are both bent. I will keep everyone posted.
                              Thanks again,
                              Nick

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X
                              Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.