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Tig welding 4130 tubes, neeb question

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  • #16
    welding 4130 tubing

    hello all,
    preheating or annealing as some call it,it not required on 4130 tubing
    you would have to get the tubing a 1550 degrees,and hold it a that temp
    from anywhere to 30min to 24hrs ,depending on the thickness,and as far
    as what cup to use i use a no.8 for all my tubing,and if you want it to look
    really slick,,,use a gas lense cup

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    • #17
      Originally posted by gary gonzales View Post
      hello all,
      preheating or annealing as some call it,it not required on 4130 tubing
      you would have to get the tubing a 1550 degrees,and hold it a that temp
      from anywhere to 30min to 24hrs ,depending on the thickness,and as far
      as what cup to use i use a no.8 for all my tubing,and if you want it to look
      really slick,,,use a gas lense cup

      Gary,
      Preheating is different then a post weld anneal. And yes you need the post weld anneal to do a proper job. Im not going to go into the details of it here but the short version is the untempered Martensite due to the rapid gas quench when tig or mig welding the thin material. Simply warming the joint up to a dull red, and slowly letting it cool takes the Martensite through its critical temperature range without it becoming un-tempered. You wont find this on think sections but its very common on tubing. There have been many reported failures of Tig and Mig welds on 4130 due to this exact cause. What you described is commonly called normalizing, and is different then a full anneal. We in the aircraft industry have had to learn the hard way about this material, its easy to work with, welds beautifully, but must be treated right.
      Have fun!

      -Aaron
      "Better Metalworking Through Research"

      Miller Dynasty 300DX
      Miller Dynasty 200DX
      Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
      Miller Millermatic Passport

      Miller Spot Welder
      Motor-Guard stud welder

      Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

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      • #18
        been welding the thing up, me and my friends tacked it all together, and now we are welding it all up. we used 1/2 a tank on tacking and practicing welding. I am a master hole wizard. I think I made most holes, and I have filler most holes. Using er70S2 is pretty easy, I tried a bit stronger material and it became harder to weld because it did not flow as easily.

        Anyways, basically non of us know how to weld right, so we are trying our best. Its very easy to make a hole in 4130 1x0.035 tubing even with 1/16 tungsten and welder set to 75amps top.

        After we finish the welding, I take some good pics. For now just some spoilers:

        Me welding:


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        • #19
          Yep Practice Practice Practice. And while your at it invest in a long sleeve welding jacket. Skin cancer and/or burns isnt fun. Also post weld anneal if its critical.

          -Aaron
          "Better Metalworking Through Research"

          Miller Dynasty 300DX
          Miller Dynasty 200DX
          Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
          Miller Millermatic Passport

          Miller Spot Welder
          Motor-Guard stud welder

          Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

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          • #20
            some more pics, my friend took them:



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            • #21
              couple more:

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              • #22
                You're welds appear to be overheated and contaminated. Make sure to clean the material of all mill scale and dirt/residue before welding. In a few of the pictures, your tungsten looks to be sticking out way too far causing you to lose gas coverage. The bead is inconsistent and lumpy.. you really need to practice laying down a consistent bead without overheating before welding the real deal. Practice, Practice, Practice

                I noticed you're using magnets near one of the welds also. I dont know if you experienced this, but in my experiences this will cause an erratic arc and it makes it very hard to even get a decent tack weld, much less a full bead.

                I see some gaps in the fitup of the tubing also. This will cause you a lot of headaches especially when welding .035" wall tubing. It makes it hard to get a decent bead, and it makes it very easy to blow a large hole. Try and keep your tubing fitup very tight.

                Im not bagging on you, just some constructive criticism. You gotta start somewhere and weve all been there before. Good luck with your project.

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                • #23
                  I got magnets on fire, and made good amount of holes.

                  How do I know overheating?
                  and ye, I forget to clean stuff before I weld.

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