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  • #46
    The dies for the roller I mentioned earlier in this post were all home built, crude but they got the job done. In fact he had 4 different sets of dies, one for bending flat bar, another for angle and two sets for two sizes of square tube.

    I look forward to seeing you machine some nice dies for your "new project"!!!!
    at home:
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    at work:
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    Retired:Shopmaster 300 with a HF-251

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    • #47
      Grumple, I re-read and realized your already purchased the SO bender.
      Sounds like fun; I'll (read: we'll) be looking forward to some pictures.
      Maxstar 200DX
      Maxstar 300DX
      Dynasty 200DX
      Passport
      Spectrum 701
      LMSW-52 spot welder

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      • #48
        Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
        OK, I'll chime in.

        I have the Hossfeld #2, the Harbor Freight compact bender, a Di-acro #2, the cheapo ebay ring roller, a 52" sheet metal slip roller, and a 13" home-made "band-roller" (for lack of a better term). I've owned several other benders and I've made other benders as well.

        In my experience, bending bar and tubing is all about three things: leverage, the correct die(s), and operator trial and error (emphasis on the latter). Over the years, I've done more stuff on that $79 HF bender or around a sacrificial plywood form than I've done with my more expensive benders. Why? ...Because it's what I had at the time. If it was too hard to pull on the little bender, I just added heat as required. Don't have the right die for a couple of bends?... carved it out with a band saw (jig saw, whatever saw) and pulled around it. Making a throw away die also lets me keep tailoring it to account for springback... something a "degree indicator" isn't going to help you with. When I need to repeat bends, I just scribe a line and/or clamp a stop, then zing-bang it's go time.

        As I got into bending heavier metal and some tube shapes, I picked up a the Hossfeld. Yeah, I had plans to make a sweet bender, but when the time arose, I had a job to do and time is money, so I ordered a Hossfeld. IMHO, it is a relatively crude tool, but that's OK because it's all operator control anyhoo. As anyone familiar with a Hossfeld style machine knows, you don't rely on the machine for accuracy... it's all in operator patience and diligence. I prefer CNC dies to the Hossfeld factory dies, as they are more accurate. Conversely, Hossfeld has it all figured out and has TONS of dies available... although they will cost you. You have to pay to play.

        Yes, you can roll rings on the Hossfeld... but why bother when you can buy a ring roller on ebay for under $100? Got a lathe? Make some dies. Want to bend stock other than flat bar on your ring roller?... it's all about the dies Don't care about distortion?... Then just bend/roll it on the flat dies and get 'er done.

        I made my own "band roller" because I could. I made it to roll 1/8" -1/4" thick material x 13" wide. It works like a champ... effortlessly. Can I roll tubing on it? Sure, if I made a set of dies for it.... which is a PITA. So I won't. I'll use my cheapo ring roller and make dies for it as necessary. How thick of tubing can I roll on it? Don't know yet... my guess is 2 x 2 x .120 wall will be some workout. But hey, if I got a couple of arches to do, it aint no big deal. If I gots 40 arches to do... time to fork over some coin and get another macheen. Will that macheen be more accurate? No, it will be just as accurate... as I am. It will, however, most likely be motor driven so I won't be sweatin' my *%$&^ off turning that d@mn wheel.

        The Di-acro #2 is very nice and I have a large assortment of dies to go with it. I use it for smaller stuff, especially when I need repeatability and accuracy... which this little machine can offer... accompanied with operator diligence. There are larger versions of this machine, but now that I own a Hossfeld, I'm no longer interested.

        In summary, I am into prototyping and general custom fabrication, so I need a variety of benders and the "universal" Hossfeld comes in handy. If I were making roll cages or doing something else that required a good amount of tube bending, I would not hesitate for a moment to purchase a hydraulic tube bender for good, consistent, accurate mandrel tube bending.

        It all depends on what you're doing and what kind of results you're looking for and what is acceptable for the job at hand.

        As my father always says, "Hit it with a hammer." ...which is what I do a lot of the time. By the time I fumble with all the pins and dies to make a hard 90 degree bend in some bar stock, I could have just hit it a couple of times with a hammer.

        Start bending something, people. Let's see some pics.

        Grumple, my advice is to buy the cheapo ring roller and the HF compact bender. You'll be out $200 and you'll be able to bend so much metal it's sick.

        Good night, everybody!
        Great post!!!
        Miller 251...sold the spoolgun to DiverBill.
        Miller DialArc 250
        Lincoln PrecisionTig 275
        Hypertherm 900 plasma cutter
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        Logan 7" shaper
        Ellis 3000 band saw
        Hossfeld bender w/shopbuilt hyd.
        Victor Journeyman torch and gauges
        3 Gerstner boxes of mostly Starrett tools
        Lots of dust bunnies
        Too small of a shop at 40 X 59.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
          OK, I'll chime in.

          I have the Hossfeld #2, the Harbor Freight compact bender, a Di-acro #2, the cheapo ebay ring roller, a 52" sheet metal slip roller, and a 13" home-made "band-roller" (for lack of a better term). I've owned several other benders and I've made other benders as well.

          In my experience, bending bar and tubing is all about three things: leverage, the correct die(s), and operator trial and error (emphasis on the latter). Over the years, I've done more stuff on that $79 HF bender or around a sacrificial plywood form than I've done with my more expensive benders. Why? ...Because it's what I had at the time. If it was too hard to pull on the little bender, I just added heat as required. Don't have the right die for a couple of bends?... carved it out with a band saw (jig saw, whatever saw) and pulled around it. Making a throw away die also lets me keep tailoring it to account for springback... something a "degree indicator" isn't going to help you with. When I need to repeat bends, I just scribe a line and/or clamp a stop, then zing-bang it's go time.

          As I got into bending heavier metal and some tube shapes, I picked up a the Hossfeld. Yeah, I had plans to make a sweet bender, but when the time arose, I had a job to do and time is money, so I ordered a Hossfeld. IMHO, it is a relatively crude tool, but that's OK because it's all operator control anyhoo. As anyone familiar with a Hossfeld style machine knows, you don't rely on the machine for accuracy... it's all in operator patience and diligence. I prefer CNC dies to the Hossfeld factory dies, as they are more accurate. Conversely, Hossfeld has it all figured out and has TONS of dies available... although they will cost you. You have to pay to play.

          Yes, you can roll rings on the Hossfeld... but why bother when you can buy a ring roller on ebay for under $100? Got a lathe? Make some dies. Want to bend stock other than flat bar on your ring roller?... it's all about the dies Don't care about distortion?... Then just bend/roll it on the flat dies and get 'er done.

          I made my own "band roller" because I could. I made it to roll 1/8" -1/4" thick material x 13" wide. It works like a champ... effortlessly. Can I roll tubing on it? Sure, if I made a set of dies for it.... which is a PITA. So I won't. I'll use my cheapo ring roller and make dies for it as necessary. How thick of tubing can I roll on it? Don't know yet... my guess is 2 x 2 x .120 wall will be some workout. But hey, if I got a couple of arches to do, it aint no big deal. If I gots 40 arches to do... time to fork over some coin and get another macheen. Will that macheen be more accurate? No, it will be just as accurate... as I am. It will, however, most likely be motor driven so I won't be sweatin' my *%$&^ off turning that d@mn wheel.

          The Di-acro #2 is very nice and I have a large assortment of dies to go with it. I use it for smaller stuff, especially when I need repeatability and accuracy... which this little machine can offer... accompanied with operator diligence. There are larger versions of this machine, but now that I own a Hossfeld, I'm no longer interested.

          In summary, I am into prototyping and general custom fabrication, so I need a variety of benders and the "universal" Hossfeld comes in handy. If I were making roll cages or doing something else that required a good amount of tube bending, I would not hesitate for a moment to purchase a hydraulic tube bender for good, consistent, accurate mandrel tube bending.

          It all depends on what you're doing and what kind of results you're looking for and what is acceptable for the job at hand.

          As my father always says, "Hit it with a hammer." ...which is what I do a lot of the time. By the time I fumble with all the pins and dies to make a hard 90 degree bend in some bar stock, I could have just hit it a couple of times with a hammer.

          Start bending something, people. Let's see some pics.

          Grumple, my advice is to buy the cheapo ring roller and the HF compact bender. You'll be out $200 and you'll be able to bend so much metal it's sick.

          Good night, everybody!
          Chris,
          Great post, lots of info, and fun to read. I am going to just build me a ring roller as the priorities have changed a little where I have more time to make it a project.
          Thanks,
          Grumple
          Oxy/Ac Large Tanks
          Miller Swinger AC 180 (SOLD)
          Miller Syncrowave 250DX Runner with Pulser

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by c wagner View Post
            The dies for the roller I mentioned earlier in this post were all home built, crude but they got the job done. In fact he had 4 different sets of dies, one for bending flat bar, another for angle and two sets for two sizes of square tube.

            I look forward to seeing you machine some nice dies for your "new project"!!!!
            I look forward to that myself! Still have to finish running the emt and wiring.
            Grumple
            Oxy/Ac Large Tanks
            Miller Swinger AC 180 (SOLD)
            Miller Syncrowave 250DX Runner with Pulser

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
              Grumple, I re-read and realized your already purchased the SO bender.
              Sounds like fun; I'll (read: we'll) be looking forward to some pictures.
              Yeah, I have had it for a while but didn't bolt it to the floor for months as I could not find the perfect location without it being in the way or limiting its capacity on length of tubing etc that could be bent. I had drawings all over the floor with the bolt hole pattern. Thats what happens when you have a big shop thats full of junk but its all "good junk".
              Grumple
              Oxy/Ac Large Tanks
              Miller Swinger AC 180 (SOLD)
              Miller Syncrowave 250DX Runner with Pulser

              Comment

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