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Snowplow reface

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  • Snowplow reface

    I just got in a Meyers snowplow that needs refaced. As soon as i get the sheet rolled i will put up some pics...Bob

  • #2
    One plow i,m not a big fan of.Nevertheless good luck with your project.

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    • #3
      I presume you are going to get it over rolled a touch so it will need to be pulled in tight?

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      • #4
        Yup i will be working my magic in the rolls. I will make it in 2 pcs so i can roll it rather then bend it in the press brake since its 91" wide...Bob

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        • #5
          That's what I thought. I've never done a snowplow, but I've done several D9 Cat dozers. they are rolled to a smaller radius then tacked on the bottom and run up on something solid and tacked on top befroe welding out.
          I was curious to see if the same method was applied to the plow.

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          • #6
            Did it from a flat sheet, rolled it on in place. Look at the last pic, blow some holes in the angles to let the water drain out.
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Sberry

              nice job.
              aametalmaster, how is yours comming along ??

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              • #8
                I shouldnt have hijacked Bob's thread. He is or probably will be aware of the drain hole problem, its an easy fix with the skin off.
                I will agree about the old Meyers, I got mine for free and thats about what its worth. One major big pain in the azz.
                I didnt have the sheet rolled, did it on the frame with a couple clamps.
                Last edited by Sberry; 07-28-2008, 01:33 PM.

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                • #9
                  No prob on the hijacking thats how we all learn. I guess .080 ish steel can be bent around pretty easy sure better than 3/16" plate from the old days. This plow is only 2 years old and took a beating last winter plus the salt eating at it. The only thing i did so far is order the steel and price a new cutting edge, his is broke but i would use it like that if it was mine it won't hurt a thing unless it falls apart on a big job so i guess a new one would be a good idea...Bob.

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                  • #10
                    so when you guys get the pieces rolled or braked... how do you figure out the radius if youre sending it out to have it done else where, when you cant slowly get the radius you need.

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                    • #11
                      Just cut out a cardboard template to give to the shop doing the forming. A lot of times plows or dozer blades aren't a perfect radius, especially if worn or bent, so a template will get you very close.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sberry View Post
                        Did it from a flat sheet, rolled it on in place. Look at the last pic, blow some holes in the angles to let the water drain out.
                        How thick was the material and what type of steel? Did you use a torch to heat it? Nice shop, by the way!

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                        • #13
                          No heat, I believe it was 16ga. I used the full sheet to help with muscling it and as I recall had a 4 inch channel or something I clamped along it, I figured out something, as I recall it took an hour or so. If I was going to roll it I would have it slightly undersized so I could spring it back against it, with 16 I could manage , heavier would likely be a problem.

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                          • #14
                            Well its almost done. I just need to bolt the cutting edge on when it comes in. I used 14 ga sheetmetal a 2x4 and a hyd jack with a chain wraped around the plow and the metal jacked down using the chain on top of the jack. 3 jacks would have worked better for re adjustment reasons. My arbor press would have been great to use if i had it welded together. Cost was 64 bucks for the sheetmetal and 120 for the cutting edge with shipping and 10 bucks for the paint...Bob
                            Attached Files

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
                              Well its almost done. I just need to bolt the cutting edge on when it comes in. I used 14 ga sheetmetal a 2x4 and a hyd jack with a chain wraped around the plow and the metal jacked down using the chain on top of the jack. 3 jacks would have worked better for re adjustment reasons. My arbor press would have been great to use if i had it welded together. Cost was 64 bucks for the sheetmetal and 120 for the cutting edge with shipping and 10 bucks for the paint...Bob
                              4 months later.

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