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  • More SS Pipe

    I while back I had to run 300+' of 3" and 4", 10ga flanged stainless steel drain piping in a drug processing facility, we just got a contract for another 300' and we will be starting right after the first of June. Here are some pics from the original job.

    jack
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Nice work. Thanks for sharing. What equipment are you using?
    Maxstar 200DX
    Maxstar 300DX
    Dynasty 200DX
    Passport
    Spectrum 701
    LMSW-52 spot welder

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
      Nice work. Thanks for sharing. What equipment are you using?
      Miller Maxstar 200SD, a WP-17 tig torch, 3/32" 2% Thor, 18 cfh and about 60-65 amps using 3/32" 308L Sandvik fill rod.

      Jack

      Comment


      • #4
        Nice welds..

        What machine do you use to cut the SS pipes??

        I would like to find a machine thats good for home use only because I might do some SS304 tubing for exhaust and car stuff, but I dont know which machine can handle the hard SS..

        thank you.

        Cleaver
        newbi welder

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by cleaver View Post
          ...What machine do you use to cut the SS pipes?...
          Cleaver
          A wraparound, a sharpie and a Milwaukee portaband with a good blade.

          Jack
          Last edited by platypus20; 05-22-2008, 04:41 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by platypus20 View Post
            A wraparound, a sharpie and a Milwaukee portaband witha good blade.

            Jack
            Silly question...what is a wraparound?!

            So, with regards to stainless, its better to cut with a bandsaw huh?

            How about a dry cut saw?
            newbi welder

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by cleaver View Post
              Silly question...what is a wraparound?!

              So, with regards to stainless, its better to cut with a bandsaw huh?

              How about a dry cut saw?
              A wraparound is a very heavy paper like strip of material about 5" wide and about 36" long, other size are available, (see Ironhead's pic) you wrap it around the pipe, you tighten it up and square the edge, and it gives a straight line that can be marked with a sharpie, soapstone or some other type of marker, then the wraparound is removed leaving a straight line around the pipe.

              Is the portaband the best tool to cut the pipe, no, but it works, its light weight and blades are easy to change, and in most cases its already on the jobsite. A cold cut or dry cut saw could work but as you are working, it hard to move the saw to where you need it and it not always easy to move the pipe to the saw. In onsite fabbing, its some times necessary to cut with the pipe in place, other types of saws this can be a problem. In the past, I used a wraparound, then cut the pipe with a zipwheel in a hand grinder, it works, its lightweight, but its easier to make a mistake with, because they cut so fast.

              Jack
              Last edited by platypus20; 05-22-2008, 04:45 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cleaver View Post
                Silly question...what is a wraparound?!

                So, with regards to stainless, its better to cut with a bandsaw huh?

                How about a dry cut saw?
                Cleaver, you can use a number of cutting tools to cut stainless, just like any other metal. The fast and economical choice for an newbie IMO would be an abrasive chopsaw. It sounds like your project would involve a bunch of small pre-bent components... in that case, IMHO, an upright/vertical bandsaw (or hacksaw) combined with a stationary disk sander would be your ticket to proper fit-up. Vertical metal-cutting bandsaws don't usually come cheap, however. You could even use a cutting wheel on your hand-held grinder. If your making exhaust related products and you plan on using GTAW to zip them up, you're going to be (or at least you should be) concerned with a bingo fit-up... not to mention back-purging, .... blah blah blah... but I'm sure you know all of that jingo-jango. Cut it any way you like, just cut it on the money. Dry cut saw should work fine. Just consider how you will clamp up the pieces for cutting.

                Jack's fitting larger O.D. pipe most of the time (I assume), so he has his system down , and I also assume he uses a portaband because 1. he can cut a decent diameter with it and 2. he can take it to the jobsite.

                We'll look forward to your project pics, Beavis. I mean Beaver... I mean Cleaver.

                I hope this helps. Good luck.
                Last edited by chrisgay@sbcglo; 05-22-2008, 05:05 PM. Reason: clarification
                Maxstar 200DX
                Maxstar 300DX
                Dynasty 200DX
                Passport
                Spectrum 701
                LMSW-52 spot welder

                Comment


                • #9
                  OOOOOoooo...Now, I get what a wraparound is.

                  Thank you!

                  haha..beaver, I have been called that many times in the past

                  Well, to be honest, I actually already have an abrasive chop saw (dewalt), and a small band saw (vertical, but the blade broke and I dont know what size it is cuz its not a normal sized bandsaw).

                  I was looking into getting a dry cut saw because I have heard good things with the quality cuts it makes. But I havent heard anyone (YET) using a dry cut saw cutting stainless steel pipes, thats why I asked...

                  Thank you again for the explanation and answers! I appreciate it very much!!! I will do more research and ask questions maybe on another thread in the motorsports section!!!

                  Thank you.

                  Regards,
                  Cleaver
                  newbi welder

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Cleaver, I would measure up for a new blade and ask your supplier for a recommended tooth configuration for stainless. Generally, it'll be the same tpi, you would just run the rpms a little slower.

                    Man, I didn't realize you already had some equipment... get on it! I thought you were a sUperfreshy.

                    I'll go follow this on your new post.
                    Last edited by chrisgay@sbcglo; 05-23-2008, 07:49 AM.
                    Maxstar 200DX
                    Maxstar 300DX
                    Dynasty 200DX
                    Passport
                    Spectrum 701
                    LMSW-52 spot welder

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
                      Cleaver, I would measure up for a new blade and ask your supplier for a recommended tooth configuration for stainless. Generally, it'll be the same tpi, you would just run the rpms a little slower.

                      Man, I didn't realize you already had some equipment... get on it! I thought you were a sUperfreshy.

                      I'll go follow this on your new post.
                      haha..thanks.

                      I posted a new post with regards to cutting stainless steel and it is actually to helpout my friend who runs a shop. However, I myself is considering on buying a cold cut saw too.

                      Oh, just a question with regards to bandsaws...can shops/companies make specific size blades? Or are there standard ones?

                      Will see what happends with my money savings

                      thank you.
                      newbi welder

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        There should be outfits/suplliers in your area who will make a blade to fit your machine. They take it off of a roll, cut it, and weld it to size. Many larger bandsaws come equipped with blade welders. I have welded my own blades in a pinch, but have found it easier just to purchase them from the suplier... always keep a spare. I have a number of bandsaws in my studio and they all have cut their share of material. Blades get tired and are consumables just like abrasives, etc.

                        Cold saws are nice, and had I understood your situation better, I may have recommended one for your appication. It might be a larger sized cold-saw to handle the 4" O.D. tubing. I like cold-saws, but have gotten by for years and years without one. I was always planning on getting one, but now it just seems like another machine to take up space in my shop.

                        Good luck.
                        Last edited by chrisgay@sbcglo; 05-23-2008, 09:40 AM. Reason: spelling
                        Maxstar 200DX
                        Maxstar 300DX
                        Dynasty 200DX
                        Passport
                        Spectrum 701
                        LMSW-52 spot welder

                        Comment

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