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Possible tig only small business

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  • Possible tig only small business

    Hello all,

    I'm currently working a temporary gig tig welding aluminum.

    I'm pretty good at it, like it, etc. I still have a bunch to learn, but that will always be the case.

    Anyway, I was thinking about the possibility of a part-time small business with just an Dynasty 200dx, and was wondering if anyone had any thoughts on that?

    I envision being very portable with a small argon tank, as well as doing work in my garage. Pick-up and delivery will be offered as well.

    I would advertise as speciality or high-tech, welding aluminum and stainless mainly. From the tiny bit of research I've done it seems that restaurants and medical businesses could be possible customers.

    So how 'bout it? Do-able? Does anyone have any web links to similar businesses? Advice? I ran my own powder coating and abrasive blasting shop in the past, so I'm not green at the business thing.

    Also, as my 'main' business will require a van and trailer, all the other odds and ends required are no problem. I'm also a tool guy and have a bunch. My thinking is the worst case scenerio is this: I'll have a great welder for personal use and 500 useless business cards.

    Thanks,

    James
    Last edited by jamscal; 05-31-2007, 07:03 PM.

  • #2
    Very doable and a very useful niche, especially in a city.

    Comment


    • #3
      yep, i would think if ou can get the word out, its verry doable. all the resteronts have almost every thing in SS and the dyn200's ability to be portable and run off any electrical socket defenetly helps.
      good luck.

      Comment


      • #4
        That is about 5% of my business and growing .

        Comment


        • #5
          In any business ,especially a small one, a niche is a good thing if you can find one. I do sorta the same thing. I dont do any road work only in the shop and 90% of the repair work is aluminum for some reason. i have thought about the dynasty as well because i do get some calls for marine repairs but since I already have a full time job, it would be hard for me to make the repairs when they want them. Especially since its always "right now". I used to advertise in the phone book but found it not very useful. Got some calls, but like I said most wanted things done "today" and I couldn't always do that. So now I wont work on it unless they can leave it, at least a day.

          Good luck

          Comment


          • #6
            the dyn200 is defenetly the welder for mobile work lik docks and resteronts. i realy like my TA-185 but it requires 220V where the dyn200 would let you use a 110V option wich is every where and most of the resteront and dock work is going to be on thin stuff ny way so 110V TIG would be great. mine is small and easy, well easy enough to cary for most people but i could see having to bring my generator with me to provide power. where the dyn200 i could throw in the front seat with me and the most i would need would be a 25-50ft. extention cord. man i gotta get me one of them, well i supose a job would help. although if i had a job i would probly have the dyn insted of the TA, is this a chicken or egg came first kind of thing.

            Comment


            • #7
              I say go for it! I have been wanting to get an inverter Tig machine for awhile so I could do small jobs in restaurants, etc. I have lost a few jobs because my cables couldn't reach from the truck (I have a high-frequency box that attaches to my trailblazer 302 for tig welding). I think if you really target the niche you can do well.

              Comment


              • #8
                I get a lot of jobs just because of the mobility of my dynasty.i have done s.s. pipe,brewerys,fast food grills,pipe organs, all kinds of stuff,today we had to do a repair for the cirque de sole(sp?).the thing with alot of this work is that you not only need to weld,but have a good pipe and pressure vessel back ground because the owners/managers of the equipment dont always know much about it.on a large job you will have codes and inspector to go by. when a micro-brewery calls you to fix a tank,they are counting on you to know what to do.You will need to get your name out there and people will call.In my area the sheetmetal shops tend to do alot of the restaurant work.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have also considered getting a dynasty for that same reason. I live near a resort with tons of restaurants, night clubs etc and have gotten some calls. But... I hate working out of the shop, it seems you never have what you need. Also in the shop I can do it when I want too and most of these people need it now. But you never know, I might just have to break down and do it anyway. Sounds like some work might be there. I say go for it if you can

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for all the replies and encouragement. I may just make a go of it after further researching this.

                    The thing I'm trying to grasp right now is certifications. Some of the local welders advertise just being certified, but I understand you are certified for a specific type of welding, and further, specific base metals and positions. So it's possible they are certified in say, GMAW vertical down in mild steel, and could have nothing in GTAW stainless???

                    What would be close to a coverall certification, or if that's not possible, what tough certification or combination of certifications would lend credence that I know what the heck I'm doing(given that I want to do specialized tig work).

                    If someone could further educate me on certs. or know of a good basic link I'd appreciate it.

                    Thanks,

                    James

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Restaurants

                      Well as for restaurant repair most of your work will be done at night after 7pm
                      where abouts is your location? I was a chef before a welder.I dont know of any certs to get you in the door. All you really need is a good under standing of what your doing the material that you'll be working on mostly and getting your foot in the door. most chefs like myself are picky about your apperenance
                      if you look professional chances are I hired the right person that means
                      when asked a question you dont spit and sputter over your words like aa or hmm I dont know ,I guess so, most chefs that you will find have no sence of humor.We take food very very seriously.

                      There is a few places over here that build there equipment but no one portable not that I have heard anyway.Anyway these places dont care if you are certified or not if you can tig and I mean really tig then all you need is a chance at the right place because word of mouth travels.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm in Louisville, KY. We have plenty of restaurants.

                        I wasn't worried about certs so much for restaurants as the more complex stuff. But being relatively new and part-time I wouldn't attempt anything beyond my capabilities. (I won't start by doing stainless pipe in 6G 20 feet off the ground, for example.)

                        I did find some general information on certs. over at the AWS forum.

                        Thanks,

                        James

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          be shore to be set up to back gass, some of the protective past might not be a bad idea eather.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jamscal View Post
                            Thanks for all the replies and encouragement. I may just make a go of it after further researching this.

                            The thing I'm trying to grasp right now is certifications. Some of the local welders advertise just being certified, but I understand you are certified for a specific type of welding, and further, specific base metals and positions. So it's possible they are certified in say, GMAW vertical down in mild steel, and could have nothing in GTAW stainless???

                            What would be close to a coverall certification, or if that's not possible, what tough certification or combination of certifications would lend credence that I know what the heck I'm doing(given that I want to do specialized tig work).

                            If someone could further educate me on certs. or know of a good basic link I'd appreciate it.

                            Thanks,

                            James
                            Hi James

                            When you boil it all down welder Certifications are only needed when a third party inspector is called for in the job specifications.


                            No one cert will qualify a person to be "Mr. Welder Man" As for other welders advertising certifications they are playing on the general publics (and their own) lacking of knowledge of the certification process and uses.

                            This applies in the USA only. As I understand it other countries have a system much the electricians have in the USA

                            For the business you are talking about you are selling your self more than the skills or the work you intend to do. You want to show up clean, professional, organized and lacking nuts and bolts sticking out of your nose. Confidence is good arrogant is foolish.

                            Never show up during the busy time of the day asking if they need something fixed.
                            TJ
                            Last edited by Fat-Fab.com; 06-05-2007, 11:25 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Fat-Fab.com View Post
                              As for other welders advertising certifications they are playing on the general publics (and their own) lacking of knowledge of the certification process and uses.
                              I think you've probably hit the nail on the head with that one. Thanks for the advice.

                              -James

                              Comment

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