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  • Alum pot metal rod and a torch

    I got some Crown Royal Kirkrod a few years back just to try it out. But i haven't found anything i couldn't weld with my spoolgun so i never used it, until today. I took some 1 1/2" OD alum pipe cut lengthwise and vise gripped it back together with a small gap prob equal to the sawblade. Then i torch welded it with the RK rod and it welded great. I couldn't hand break the parts when i was done...Bob
    Bob Wright

    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

  • #2
    brazing rod

    Be careful using that zinc filler. And also be careful calling it welding, as its not even close. The base metal tends to absorb some of the zinc at temperature and depending on the alloy, makes the base metal brittle. Its an OK emergency BRAZING rod or on pot metal castings, but I wouldnt rely on it for anything. I see a lot of aluminum car bodies with that garbage on them, and I end up cutting out the entire area to be able to gas weld it back up again. I think its mostly sold at flea markets by the equivelant of modern day gypsys, unfortunately a lot of people believe them.

    -Aaron
    "Better Metalworking Through Research"

    Miller Dynasty 300DX
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    • #3
      there is a site that sells several diferent kinds of rods for aluminum joining but its realy much more like brazing than actualy welding. torch or TIG would be the best long term structural option but soem things it would be ok for a non strees repair or as a temperary fix knowing the temp. fix could end upo making the fix much more complicateed.
      i'll see if i can find the link to the site , they can send you out some good info on it.
      HF also sells a similer aluminum brazing rod, again not welding just brazing.
      thanks for the help
      ......or..........
      hope i helped
      sigpic
      feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
      summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
      JAMES

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      • #4
        Thanks guys, i wouldn't trade my spoolgun in for it, but i have seen some parts fixed with it that looked good. Nothing structrual just junk castings...Bob
        Bob Wright

        Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
        http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

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        • #5
          yep , thats about where its best suited i would think. they do make some prity impressive claims but i think i would only use it like ya said quick nonstructural fixes.
          thanks for the help
          ......or..........
          hope i helped
          sigpic
          feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
          summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
          JAMES

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          • #6
            I got some HTS2000 alum brazing rod. I built up some corrosion on a water pump outlet and it seemed to me to hold well. i tried it on some 18ga 3003 al and had a little less luck, but I think it'll work for small stuff. Now, the trouble is I have an Allard nose cowl with some stress cracks that a guy wants me to try to fix. I don't know what alloy it is. but its been bondoed and sanded to paper thin thickness. I don't think I'd do too well with the tig because its so dirty and thin. Don't want to have to replace the whole piece on the car.
            makoman1860, suggestions? You don't like the brazing for small (less than 1") cracks?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Little View Post
              I got some HTS2000 alum brazing rod. I built up some corrosion on a water pump outlet and it seemed to me to hold well. i tried it on some 18ga 3003 al and had a little less luck, but I think it'll work for small stuff. Now, the trouble is I have an Allard nose cowl with some stress cracks that a guy wants me to try to fix. I don't know what alloy it is. but its been bondoed and sanded to paper thin thickness. I don't think I'd do too well with the tig because its so dirty and thin. Don't want to have to replace the whole piece on the car.
              makoman1860, suggestions? You don't like the brazing for small (less than 1") cracks?
              I would stay away from that flea market rod especially for stress cracks in sheet. thats exactly the thing I end up re-doing due to the base metal getting brittle and cracking even further. The torch works perfectly for this kind of work with just the right flux, your normal tig rod, and some practice. Check out Kents site at www.tinmantech.com for details and pictures. If you try to tig it either backpurge or use a backing flux, otherwise youve lost some of your metal thickness to oxidation. Have fun!!
              -Aaron
              "Better Metalworking Through Research"

              Miller Dynasty 300DX
              Miller Dynasty 200DX
              Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
              Miller Millermatic Passport

              Miller Spot Welder
              Motor-Guard stud welder

              Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

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              • #8
                Being the metals so dirty I'd suggest somthing with flux. Flux forming proccesses are generaly better at scavenging garbage out of the weld pool then gas sheilded proccesses. I'd go with makoman1860's suggestion about backing the weld with a flux.

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                • #9
                  I forgot to add this comment about fluxes.

                  Be sure to use a WELDING flux, there are many BRAZING fluxes out there for aluminum, and most welding shops dont know there is a difference. Brazing fluxes have either Zinc Chloride or Zinc Flouride in them, these are not good as they alloy with the molten aluminum. Use either Aladdin aluminum WELDING flux, or Kents as posted above. Mix with spring water to a paste, paint the backside of the part (after well cleaned with alcohol) and Tig away, makes a beautiful bead on the back side, also great for tanks. Good Luck!
                  -Aaron
                  "Better Metalworking Through Research"

                  Miller Dynasty 300DX
                  Miller Dynasty 200DX
                  Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
                  Miller Millermatic Passport

                  Miller Spot Welder
                  Motor-Guard stud welder

                  Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

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                  • #10
                    Thanks, guys. Great tips. I'm going to find some al flux. Do you guys suggest using 1100 rod? Or is 4043 good for this old 1948 car?
                    Thanks again
                    Little

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Little View Post
                      Thanks, guys. Great tips. I'm going to find some al flux. Do you guys suggest using 1100 rod? Or is 4043 good for this old 1948 car?
                      Thanks again
                      Little
                      1100 all the way. 4043 ( and 4047) is actually an old alloy used for brazing believe it or not. Its high silicon content lowers the melting point below most wrought alloys, but it also makes the weld more brittle and unsatisfactory for sheet work. Your nose im guessing is either 2S or 3S as these were the most common at the time for body work, 1100 is the correct rod for it. Good Luck!
                      -Aaron
                      "Better Metalworking Through Research"

                      Miller Dynasty 300DX
                      Miller Dynasty 200DX
                      Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
                      Miller Millermatic Passport

                      Miller Spot Welder
                      Motor-Guard stud welder

                      Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        this might be of interest.
                        http://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/c...lloys.asp?id=2
                        although not the site i was looking for so i'll keep looking.
                        thanks for the help
                        ......or..........
                        hope i helped
                        sigpic
                        feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                        summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                        JAMES

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by fun4now View Post
                          this might be of interest.
                          http://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/c...lloys.asp?id=2
                          although not the site i was looking for so i'll keep looking.

                          Yeah thats in the family of things to stay away from when doing sheet work or anything that moves. Brazing is normally used for putting in fuel filler necks and other bungs in tanks. 4047 is a great brazing alloy, as is 4043. Just use the old brazing formula flux and away you go.

                          -Aaron
                          "Better Metalworking Through Research"

                          Miller Dynasty 300DX
                          Miller Dynasty 200DX
                          Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
                          Miller Millermatic Passport

                          Miller Spot Welder
                          Motor-Guard stud welder

                          Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            HTS2000


                            Looks pretty amazing!

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fC9d1AroXR4
                            RoyB
                            Dartmouth, MA

                            http://www.rvbprecision.com

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rbertalotto View Post
                              HTS2000


                              Looks pretty amazing!

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fC9d1AroXR4
                              See my previous posts in this thread about that stuff. Either weld it, braze it, or solder it....but stay the heck away from that stuff if you care about the part your working on. The real materials are less expensive anyway.
                              -Aaron
                              "Better Metalworking Through Research"

                              Miller Dynasty 300DX
                              Miller Dynasty 200DX
                              Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
                              Miller Millermatic Passport

                              Miller Spot Welder
                              Motor-Guard stud welder

                              Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

                              Comment

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