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I need some tip on building a wrought iron fence.

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  • #16
    What is the easiest way to build a jig, MIG-ateur?
    They don't call me Lucky for nothin'.

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    • #17
      I found that the plywood jig was the easiest to construct, nothing permanent and if i needed the wood after the project for something i had it. I jigged up about 100' of the fence you saw for two court yards they all came out square and the same. without a table jig of some sort i think you would constantly be trying to see if your square and not racked in one direction or the other. The time it took to build the jig was worth it to me for all the time it saved laying out the panels.

      Sorry i just realized you directed the question i believe to Mig-ateur.
      Last edited by k.a.m.; 04-01-2008, 05:28 AM. Reason: Added something

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      • #18
        No need for an apology. I just saw that his jig looked like the pickett spacing portion was pre-made..?
        They don't call me Lucky for nothin'.

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        • #19
          Jig Building 101

          My fence panels are 10' long, max, and I also made two 3' gates and one 5' gate, and I made two more 7' panels for the additional fence that encloses my pool equipment.

          So it was logical for me to build my jig 10' long. If you look closely at the pictures, you can see that I built in not only the picket spacing, which is 4", but the top and bottom rail spacing and height, so that the 1/2" pickets would be in the middle of the 1" rails with no measuring required. Each panel is identical.

          The picket spacing was accomplished by routing 1/2 grooves at the 4" spacing in two identical 1"x4" boards 10' long. These were attached to a 2"x4" frame that was made wider than the 4' panel height, and then the spacers were installed to hold the top and bottom rails at the correct locations and heights relative to the pickets. Once the jig was assembled, no measuring was required as the rails and pickets were inserted into the jig and the welding was completed. All welds were made on one side of the panel, then it was flipped over and re-inserted into the jig to hold everying square while the second side welds were all made.

          The panels came out of the jig square and flat.
          Joe

          It takes less time and money to do it right than it does to do it over!

          Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing.

          Lincoln Power Mig 140C
          Miller Elite Red Flame Hood
          DeWalt, DeWalt, DeWalt, Craftsman, Craftsman
          Delta 16.5" Drill Press w/Laser
          Kobalt 150psi Compressor, 1/2" Impact, Die Grinder, Finish Nailgun, Sprayer

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          • #20
            Thanks

            Originally posted by Bert View Post
            Joe,
            MAN you build some nice stuff!!!!
            THANKS for sharing!!!!!!
            Thanks for the compliments. Those are photos of just a few of the things I have done in the last couple of years, since I got a digital camera.

            I worked my way through high school and college in a custom cabinet shop and learned that trade as well as custom finish carpentry, remodeling, add-ons, etc.

            I continued woodworking for the next 35 years and continued to learn as I moved on to building custom furniture pieces. Still love woodworking!!

            A year and a half ago I got an hour of MIG instruction from a buddy and built a couple of small projects for my wife using his Miller 135, and I got so hooked I bought myself a Linclon 140C, and I have continued to build projects for around the house. Right now I am working on a table/work surface that will have a hydraulic jack to lift it to various working heights depending on what I am building at the time. It will primarily be used for welding, but can also be used as an outfeed table for my table saw, a work platform for my sliding compound mitre saw, a work lift for my lawn tractor, my golf cart and my son-in-law's 4-wheeler and motorcycle, and anything else I think of to use it for.

            I have been trying to get the time to start working on some projects that mix woodworking and metalworking, lending themselves to the southwest style of building and furniture making. Just not enough hours in the day.

            The jig I built for my pool fence was my first attempt at mixing the two mediums, and that was a lot of fun!

            Again, thanks for looking and thanks for the compliments!
            Joe

            It takes less time and money to do it right than it does to do it over!

            Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing.

            Lincoln Power Mig 140C
            Miller Elite Red Flame Hood
            DeWalt, DeWalt, DeWalt, Craftsman, Craftsman
            Delta 16.5" Drill Press w/Laser
            Kobalt 150psi Compressor, 1/2" Impact, Die Grinder, Finish Nailgun, Sprayer

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            • #21
              Awesome! Thanks for the tips.
              They don't call me Lucky for nothin'.

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