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  • #16
    7018 reply

    Reading replies on this site for some time. thought I would jump in. My first reply on here, so go easy on me guys.
    On your last reply, you said you were welding on 3/8 plate, with a butt joint. If that is overhead, it would be a groove weld in 4G. If it were a T joint, it would be a fillet weld in 4F. You have had some good replies. Normally a groove weld, wouldn't be made with a open root, with a 7018. It would be frequently be made with a 6010/6011 type rod for root, followed be 7018, for remaining passes. If all 7018 is called for, normally a backer, is used. If a T joint is used, backing isn't a issue, and it is a fillet.
    Normally most tests, are based on a WPS, that has to be followed, from amperage, base metal, voltage, filler metal, joint geometry, welding position, to direction of travel, etc. We have to stay within the operating limits of the WPS, and stay away from the thought, they we "have a better way", and go outside of the WPS. Well enough of that.

    Try to keep your joint fit up, close. Work on joint prep accuracy with good bevels and land. Before you start your weld, you want uniformity and accuracy of your gap spacing and bevel. Anything that is not the same, has to be dealt with through operator skill. The skill will come with practice, but control what you can, right now.

    You have a instructor. Hopefully they are in the booth with you sometimes. Someone over your shoulder, to help guide you, is valuable. Ask for that, and don't let corrective suggestions, hurt your pride. Acceptance of ideas and suggestions, creates a better welder, regardless of experience level. Good Luck.

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    • #17
      Thanks guys for all the help, its really helped alot. In response to north1, your right, it is easier to use a back up plate, 6010 root, etc. But from what I heard New Brunswick is the last province to use a 7018 rod for a root pass for government reconized welding tickets. But it`ll be a great skill to have once I do figure it out. And yes my instructers are great! They have helped me alot with their amazing welding skills. Thanks again north1.
      Last edited by apprentice welder; 03-26-2008, 05:28 PM.

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      • #18
        Just to clarify. 4F is a fillet weld in the overhead position. F4 is a designation for a weld using a filler metal with an AWS classification F-number of 4, basically your low-hi rods. F3 would mean your 6010/6011 type rods.
        In B.C. an F4 (7018) root/cap pipe is required training for an 'A' ticket. Also an F5 (stainless) root/cap. The 7018 root is good practice for the stainless test. They are similar compared to 6010 roots.

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        • #19
          out of pure curiosity, what is an "A","B","C" ticket in BC. ive got my sk. 6" "B" and my alberta small-bore "B". from what i understand, a "C" ticket here is only valid with the companyyou tested with, am i wrong?
          07 f350 duallie w/deck
          07 tb302d
          2011 big blue pro 300 cat
          victor torch
          matthey beveler
          assorted hand tools

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          • #20
            Thanks OldSparks, I didn't really know what they ment when they called them F3 and F4 tickets! I just knew what it allowed you to weld (structual welds with 6010/6011 and 7018) and what you had to do to get it.

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            • #21
              This is a good thread. I don't know squat about welding pipe and would never attempt it but it sounds really interesting. I have been trying to learn about it and threads like this are good source of info. Kudos to those with inputs.
              Webb's Welding and Repair LLC
              MM210 w/a 3035 spoolgun
              Syncrowave 250
              Spectrum 625
              Trialbazer 302 w/HF
              http://webbsweldingandrepair.com/home

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              • #22
                Hey Jetmekdc-10, it is a great thread! I have learned so much already and I'm only 16! If I were you I would give pipe a try. I even did some TIG welding on a scrap piece of pipe a few times just to see what its like, and I'm not even close to being good, but if you don't try you can't learn. Thats what I figured out so far, the more you weld, the better you get.

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                • #23
                  I've beveled some pipe and messed with it in my shop but I would not take on a job that required a spec pipe weld. My hats are off to you guys up in Canada though. Colder than I could take. I wish there was a decent school to go to here in Memphis to learn pipe welding. I'd take it in a second! Most of the calls I get in my new venture are simple things that anyone decent with a mig can handle. Some mobile Tig stuff is starting to pick up though.,Adam
                  Webb's Welding and Repair LLC
                  MM210 w/a 3035 spoolgun
                  Syncrowave 250
                  Spectrum 625
                  Trialbazer 302 w/HF
                  http://webbsweldingandrepair.com/home

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                  • #24
                    Thats great to just mess around with things, its how I learned to weld. Its to bad their's not a decent school to go to where you are. Its pretty sparse up here to, I'm taking mine through the school so I can still graduate, (still in grade 11) but I do the welding at the local union shop.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by blackbeard's welding View Post
                      out of pure curiosity, what is an "A","B","C" ticket in BC. ive got my sk. 6" "B" and my alberta small-bore "B". from what i understand, a "C" ticket here is only valid with the companyyou tested with, am i wrong?
                      In B.C. you recieve training for and have to pass a variety of practical tests for each ticket level. Also an assortment of written exams on metallurgy, layout, codes and standards etc. School time and work experiance must total one year for each level. In all cases it is likely that any company you hire on to will have their own procedural test. Working from memory...
                      'C' ticket....all position 6010/7018 open root plate, and all position 'CWB type' stick, mig, and flux core plate with backing strip
                      'B' ticket....6G 6010/7018 pipe, mild steel open root tig on plate, aluminum tig on plate
                      'A' ticket....6G 7018 root/cap on pipe, stainless stick root/cap on pipe, mild steel tig on pipe, stainless tig on pipe, intro to open root aluminum tig on pipe

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                      • #26
                        7018 vs 7018-1

                        Can somebody explain what the difference is?

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                        • #27
                          thanx old sparks, that clears things up a little. it would be nice that in the near future all relative welding tickets could be standardized from coast to coast
                          07 f350 duallie w/deck
                          07 tb302d
                          2011 big blue pro 300 cat
                          victor torch
                          matthey beveler
                          assorted hand tools

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Copperdog View Post
                            Can somebody explain what the difference is?
                            Low temperature impact spec. The -1 variant is specified at -50F, the regular at -20F

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                            • #29
                              Thanks, I try and avoid welding at -50, so the regular ones should be ok for what I do?

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Copperdog View Post
                                Thanks, I try and avoid welding at -50, so the regular ones should be ok for what I do?
                                It isn't the temp when you put in the weld, it is the temp the weld will see in service. With either, the minimum temp of the base metal when the wed goes in should be 50F, 70F is better, unless there is a reason for more preheat.

                                One place where the -1 variant is often required is marine work. It can get mighty cold in the north atlantic.

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