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  • monte55
    started a topic Flap discs

    Flap discs

    I've never used a flap disc but many of you brag on them. It was $4.97. I use soft pads a lot. Will a flap disc last as long as say 5 soft pads considering they cost over $1 each at local hardware stores? If so they will be worth their cost if they do. Comments?

  • mikeswelding
    replied
    flap disks

    Originally posted by Moose View Post
    Has anybody used Bullet Ind.??
    http://www.bulletindustries.com/catalog/
    Yes! I was waiting for someone to mention this firm. Not only do they have great prices for flap disks, they also sell things like stainless wheels for MUCH less than anywhere else I have found. Their products are very competitive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cargoon
    replied
    I like the Walter ones. Quick change and the glue doesn't heat up and stick to your steel.
    I think the flappers heat up the steel more than the other if your doing alot of polishing.
    PS Thanks for the pocket twister pictures Monte 55. I plan to build one of my own

    Leave a comment:


  • Moose
    replied
    Has anybody used Bullet Ind.??
    http://www.bulletindustries.com/catalog/

    Leave a comment:


  • SNUNEZ
    replied
    Flap Discs

    Be Proud Of Your Accomplishments Show Off Them Beads...........as You Progress In Quality Looking Beads Youll Understand Why A Welder Should Only """clean His Work"""" And Not Grind Them Down
    Dressing A Bead Should Only That Dress Should Be """cleaning Instead Of Grinding It""""

    Leave a comment:


  • jweller
    replied
    I'm gonna order some from lehigh valley based on all the reccomendations. I bought some from harbor freight and they lasted about 10 minutes each of removing paint. complete crap. Some of the HF stuff is ok for consumable items, but this isn't one of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Handy560
    replied
    Pearle...

    Pearl, you lucked out. Those are the cut off disks I was using and they last at least 3 times the Hilti. They may however have different "models" like Norton has Gemini and NorZon.

    I think the Pearl and the NorZon cut off wheels look like a similar quality...

    My couple of LWS do not carry Pearl.

    Leave a comment:


  • FabTech
    replied
    Or how about this one for Wrangler jeans Made in Mexico of US Fabric

    fun4now suggested to me using flap discs some time back, so I picked one up at Home Depot, it worked fine didnít last long I had the edge all soften up pushing it to corners. I didnít know better back then. A few weeks back I went to my LWS to pick up 2 more Lock-Jaw clamps, (these are great) and a rep from Pearl Abrasive was in, I learned a lot that day about Zirconia the difference between the T-27, T-29 and walked out with a box full of free stuff. That was a good day

    Fab Tech

    Leave a comment:


  • Handy560
    replied
    I agree...

    I agree that there are many factors and it may not be as simple as reading a label; but it should be. Economics will always seek out the cheap labor and when one country fizzles out as a source as it progresses to a certain point a different one fills the void... such is economic development.

    A few years ago "Made in Japan" was a label we used to ridicule. Now we look for many things from Japan as the top quality products. Once the economy becomes integrated it is hard to distinguish who owns it, who runs it, who machines it and who puts it together; as it should be. Your Toyota may be actually made in Indiana and your Sony in Korea.

    That does not bother me. In fact I think it is that interdependance and world economy that ultimately promotes good peaceful relations between countries.

    What pi*sses me off is the fraud or purposely deceptive advertising. In the case of a flap disk, what is made here the sandpaper only? It used to be that when something was advertised, put on TV or endorsed by a government agency it was proven fact. No room for interpretation. Now, we don't know what to beleive.

    The law should be that if it's assembled in China or anywhere else it should say just that. ASSEMBLED in China.

    If you advertise American Made, then if it is assembled in Mozombique, it should say so...
    Last edited by Handy560; 03-22-2008, 04:30 PM. Reason: cause i cAnt tyPe gOOd

    Leave a comment:


  • tacmig
    replied
    Made in China??

    Originally posted by Handy560 View Post
    That whole thing with the advertising U.S. made and then being made in China really pisses me off

    They play on our sentiments and of course I try to back up American workers when I can; sometimes even if it means paying a bit more.

    I did a house for a guy who owned a big guitar company. He advertised "Made in USA" and someone found a "Made in China" sticker on one. Got sued and Feds fined him millions...

    Of course, the same guy tried to stiff my for like $15K.

    I wonder how "flexible" they'll think they are if ya shove them up their @ss.
    The whole China thing is somewhat complicated in that "made in china" is very vague as far as its terminology and interpretation. However, after spending about 5 weeks down there last year with my family and studying the issue, I came to understand a few things about the terminology. "Made in China" only indicates that the product was made there. However, many U.S. and European countries only "assemble" their products in China due to the high cost of labor and end manufacturing expenses i.e. taxes, insurance etc. Many high quality products are assembled in China by U.S. firms such as Harley Davidson, Milwaukee tools, Bosch, Porter Cable, DeWalt, Ford, Chevy, Dodge, BMW!, MERCEDES and the list goes on. The key issue here is this: Was the product designed by Chinese firms? Was the product machined/mocked by Chinese firms? And was the end manufacturing controlled and over-seen by Chinese firms? I was interested to find out about some of my own products that I own that say "made in China". One of my Hilti drills is labeled "made in China by Hilti" Hilti is somewhat of a proprietary company from Germany or rather Liechtenstein so I wondered what was up with this. As it turns out, Hilti actually Designs, mocks and finally manufactures all the components of the drill in Germany and Liechtenstein and has them assembled in China while being over-seen by Hilti management in their own facility. So I think the short and skinny here is that you have to do a little research on every product to find out just what the definition "made in China" really means. In the U.S. anything that is imported/re-imported, assembled or otherwise the same must be labeled as "made in" but Hilti says "made in China by Hilti". Was your product "made in China" by a contracting Chinese firm or was your product "made in China" by a U.S. firm in China? This is the big question along with do we get made at ourselves for demanding more than we are worth and the Government for making doing business in the U.S. not economically viable or do we get mad at the companies trying to survive?

    TacMig

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    and they had china stamped on them.
    fabricator,
    that would piss me off enough to not pay the bill just to get my day in cort to show what a slime ball they are. no way i would be sending a check, a cort date maybe. although i supose they would just blow it off then.

    Leave a comment:


  • Handy560
    replied
    Made in China...

    That whole thing with the advertising U.S. made and then being made in China really pisses me off

    They play on our sentiments and of course I try to back up American workers when I can; sometimes even if it means paying a bit more.

    I did a house for a guy who owned a big guitar company. He advertised "Made in USA" and someone found a "Made in China" sticker on one. Got sued and Feds fined him millions...

    Of course, the same guy tried to stiff my for like $15K.

    I wonder how "flexible" they'll think they are if ya shove them up their @ss.

    Leave a comment:


  • fabricator
    replied
    Anyone try the ceramic grain yet? I just ordered 26, 4-1/2 inch.(12 60 grit,7 80 grit,and 7 120 grit) gonna give them a try.they claim to last much longer. for $ 2.35 each that aint bad.
    on a seperate note,dont wast your money or time with DETROIT INDUSTRIAL TOOL. those people continually call trying to sell me something.well this time when they said they have a new disk that performs as well as a flap disk but lasts twice as long and made in the U.S.A i said sure send me 25.well these look and grind EXACTLY like a standard 1/8 grinding disk.(they also claim that they were flexable) NOT! I payed $96 with shipping and they had china stamped on them.

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    i never said they were the same, did you read my post at all or just look at the pic. its just what i had on hand. i did mention keep in mind the walter is a 60 grit and the Vally is a 120, so that will have some effect in the thickness.

    i may have an 80 grit in the vally i'll look tomarow 4 shore, it may even be an 80grit, i just know i had more 120's then 80's

    Leave a comment:


  • Dmaxer
    replied
    Originally posted by fun4now View Post
    FWIW: here is a side by side of a walter and a vally disk. keep in mind the walter is a 60 grit and the Vally is a 120, so that will have some effect in the thickness.
    i very much like the walter disks but as a hobby guy or even a small business on a tight budget the Vally disks are a better option. they are a quality disk with good life to them. perhaps not as good as the walter but at a 4 to 1 price difference its hard to justify the walter's on a tight budget.
    C'mon. That comparison is nowhere near apples to apples. The thickness of the grit coatings alone will account for the difference....even if both were the same brand. I like Lehigh Valley too. Let's try to be objective.
    Last edited by Dmaxer; 03-22-2008, 12:24 AM.

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