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Rebar Trees

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  • Rebar Trees

    I am planning to create two trellises (8' high by 3' wide) in the shape of trees or large shrubs out of rebar and I need some info on bending and cutting rebar and how to anchor it to the ground. Currently I plan on using large coffee cans filled with concrete and inserting about 6 strands of rebar, cut to various lenths using a circular saw with an abrasive metal cutting blade. Once the concrete cures I will bury it 2' in the ground and use a manual rebar bender, basically a pole with three pegs at one end, to create the tree/shrub effect. Star Jasmine will then, hopefully, climb up these structures and provide fragrance, screening, and shade. Am I whacked? Am I biting off more than I can chew? Am I creating a safety hazard? Please advise.

  • #2
    i think its a great idea. and i cant wait to see some pic's as it progresses.
    for cutting i think a saws-all would be a better choice than a circular saw and a fiber blade. a saws-all with a metal cuttin blade should make lots of cuts befor needing to be replace. i put a fiber cutting disk on my 8 1/2" circular saw and its not prity nore dose it last verry long, the blades eat up pritty quickly. you could also try a 4 1/2" grinder with a cut off blade . i think the 4.5" grinder with a cut off blade would also be a better choice then the circular saw. but some times we have to make do with what we have so by all means dont get discuraged and not due it due to not haveing one of the tools i mentioned.
    i realy like the idea of the cement coffie can buried just dont forget to alow enough extra rebar to get you out of the ground befor starting the bends.
    i supose it could be a bit dangerous with pointed rebar sticking oout in all directions, maybee bend a circle or even just bend the tip in 1/2 back over its self to get rid of the pointy end. if you made loops at the end you could hang small planters on it wile you are waiting for it to get grown over.(see pic)
    welcome to the board by the way, lots of great people here willing to help out with almost any thig.
    be shore to share some pic's of the tree with us as you build it. what will you be welding the rebar with or will each branch be its own pice starting in the dirt??
    Attached Files

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    • #3
      Depending on how big you plan on building your trees, you may want to opt for using a 5 gal bucket full of concrete rather than a coffee can, that will surely make it more stable/secure especially when the plant begins growing and pulling on it. Please send photos of your finished product. Its a great idea!!

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      • #4
        he is going to burry the can 2ft into the ground, the can would just be an ancure to keep it from pulleing out at 2ft down i would think. eather way its still a cool idea, i wana see some pic's, where you getting the rebar and how big ?? 5/8" or smaller/bigger.

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        • #5
          Try using bolt cutters, if the end is not what you want, use a bench grinder to dress the ends.

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          • #6
            I have no pictures but last year my friend and I made 10 round bar trees. We just used the torches and heated them up to bend the round bar in the shape of branches, and just welded up other little pieces for smaller branches they looked real nice. What everyone else said about the grinder and cutting pieces sounds a lot cleaner for cutting they you have less you need to clean. Also I know another way you can anchor then down, we just added to pieces of flat bar to the side in the shape of a triangle and had a little bit of a point on the bottom and that could work as an anchor, mind you the tree will have to be made a bit taller to make of from space in the ground.

            I hope this helps
            Ryan

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            • #7
              Guys...it is...a few pieces of rebar....doesn't need a nuclear powered proton beam cutter ..put a bi-metallic blade in your arm-powered hack saw and do it in a few seconds each. If this lady can, you can too:

              http://www.homeenvy.com/db/5/75.html

              She bends rebar with a easy jig. She has some good projects in metal here and there on her site. [yeah, yeah, she does show cutting with a grinder too.]

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              • #8
                proton beam cutter

                I'm kinda lazy so I would go with the nuclear powered proton beam cutter, check ebay they have everything. Failing that the 4.5" grinder with a cutting wheel would be my first choice.

                If you are looking for design ideas try do a search for "bottle bush" or bottle tree" on line. These are a Southern garden tradition and they are fun to build.

                You are on to a great idea here.

                preacher

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                • #9
                  preacher
                  i dont think i got a chance to do so earlyer so just wanted to say welcome.
                  interesting history on the bottle tree, kinda like an african version of our indean dream catcher.
                  i took the time to do a quick serch and got a few pic's for those without the time to serch.
                  man i gotta get a life.
                  any way, they are som cool idea's for tres, enjoy the pic's
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    Thank you all very much for the input. The 5 gallon bucket vice the coffee can is something I will definately use as is using the angle grinder (it'll give me an excuse to buy another power tool ) to cut and round off the rebar, only because I couldnít find a nuclear powered proton beam cutter for sale online anywhere! Rolling the ends to prevent anyone from getting impaled will also be implemented, since I donít want to get sued if any would-be burglar fleeing the police jumps into my yard. The bottle bush pictures are exactly what I was thinking, just a little larger in scale. I can't take credit for this idea however. We first saw it on Landscape Smart, a DIY show on HGTV. There is also one web site related to this project http://www.home.earthlink.net/~rebartrees/ . Thanks again for all the input. I appreciate it. Iíll post pictures when I finish.

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                    • #11
                      if you dont have a 4 1/2" grinder, this is defenetly the time to get one, no welder should be without one. its a go to tool for many things, add a flap disk (sanding wheel) and its even better.
                      its also a good idea to get the wife used to knowing you will need to buy a new tool every time you do a project for her, this will pay off big time in the long run, its a clasic move for us maried guys.

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                      • #12
                        if you dont have a 4 1/2" grinder, this is defenetly the time to get one, no welder should be without one. its a go to tool for many things, add a flap disk (sanding wheel) and its even better.
                        its also a good idea to get the wife used to knowing you will need to buy a new tool every time you do a project for her, this will pay off big time in the long run, its a clasic move for us maried guys.

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                        • #13
                          fun4now, Here was my approach.
                          You could always teach her how to weld and buy "her" new tools. I bought my g/f "her" own syncrowave.

                          It all becomes "we" not "I" anymore. That is until it's divorce court time. Then it's all MINE..I lied!

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                          • #14
                            we spent several thousand $'s on special sewing and embroidery machines for her, the shop is my way to get out of the house and away from her.
                            truth be told if she wanted to lern i would be happy to teach and share tools with her but she has no intrest in greasy, smoaky, dirty stuff, its my space and she guards my space and tools more so than i do at times. she made me get my TIG welder when i thought we should hold off and put the $ into the hose and she wont let me loan out any tools, i could not ask for btter than that. and she is all for me getting more tools when ever the need arises. she also understands the value of buying a good tool once as aposed to buying a cheap tool several times, thats how i got my Millers.
                            i got a good one this time.

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                            • #15
                              fun4now lets all hope us younger guys get a wife like yours I know I wish I could brainwash my girlfriend anyone have any idea on how I can do this

                              Comment

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