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  • Bert
    started a topic Stainless Countertops

    Stainless Countertops

    Got a friend getting me interested in doing stainless steel countertips for residential and commercial. Mostly where the splice the pieces to put them together. So...machine and small bottle of argon gas. What would be the best portable machine for this? I'm not familiar with the thickness of stainless they use, though I'm sure it's 316 grade.
    thanks for your help,
    bert

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Bert View Post
    Got a friend getting me interested in doing stainless steel countertips for residential and commercial.
    My friend told me about this stainless steel countertop (because I’m using ceramic tile countertop), she said that it is very hygienic. At first, I don’t believe on her but when I searched it in the internet just to confirm if it’s true….I’ve found more interesting facts about this SS countertop. Besides being a beautiful addition to your kitchen, the stainless steel countertop is stain resistant and heat proof. And it will always maintain its style. Because of its strength, steel has always been considered ideal for food preparation. Stainless steel countertop maintenance is easy. All you need is detergent and water to clean it. I think I should switch to stainless steel countertop.
    Last edited by danneva; 08-23-2010, 02:50 AM.

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  • UH60LCHIEF
    replied
    Originally posted by rick-l View Post
    In North America a split phase electricity distribution system is used for residential customers. It is a 3-wire, single-phase, mid-point neutral system.

    Essentially what this consists of is a transformer whose secondary is 240 volts with a center tap added and referenced to ground. These are the 3 wires brought into the house. Between each hot wire and neutral there is 120 volts 60 Hz. except one is 180 degrees out of phase (inverted) with the other. The 120 volt loads are supposed to be equally distributed between these two hot wires. The difference between the two hot wires is 240 volts.

    If you go through the house with your meter you can find two 120 volt outlets around the kitchen whose hots are on different phases you will have 240 volts at whatever amps the lowest breaker is rated at on the 120 circuits.

    The only hazzard in this is a dedicated 240 volt breaker would have both phases mechanically tied together so if it trips all power would be removed from the machine instead of it just looking like it is off. (ignore the large area EMI current loop and turn off your pacemaker )

    Now about bending 16 ga stainless
    Thanks for the info. It sounds like amperage might still be a problem with this setup... Bummer. I guess I'll probably have to stick to spooling out my 120' 60amp extension cord to the outlet I installed at the panel for now. That frickin cord weighs a ton and is one unwieldy S.O.B. but I guess it gets the job done.

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  • rick-l
    replied
    Originally posted by UH60LCHIEF View Post
    Not to hijack, but Bodybagger could you elaborate on the setup you were referring to. I had heard that there was a way to do this and it only makes sense, but I'd love to have that capability as my home only has 115 everywhere
    In North America a split phase electricity distribution system is used for residential customers. It is a 3-wire, single-phase, mid-point neutral system.

    Essentially what this consists of is a transformer whose secondary is 240 volts with a center tap added and referenced to ground. These are the 3 wires brought into the house. Between each hot wire and neutral there is 120 volts 60 Hz. except one is 180 degrees out of phase (inverted) with the other. The 120 volt loads are supposed to be equally distributed between these two hot wires. The difference between the two hot wires is 240 volts.

    If you go through the house with your meter you can find two 120 volt outlets around the kitchen whose hots are on different phases you will have 240 volts at whatever amps the lowest breaker is rated at on the 120 circuits.

    The only hazzard in this is a dedicated 240 volt breaker would have both phases mechanically tied together so if it trips all power would be removed from the machine instead of it just looking like it is off. (ignore the large area EMI current loop and turn off your pacemaker )

    Now about bending 16 ga stainless

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  • UH60LCHIEF
    replied
    Not to hijack, but Bodybagger could you elaborate on the setup you were referring to. I had heard that there was a way to do this and it only makes sense, but I'd love to have that capability as my home only has 115 everywhere but the box and currently (as it would have cost nearly $1600 to run it to the garage)I have installed a 230V recepticle at the box and run a 60amp commercial extension cord to the garage. It works, but reeling it out and in is a PITA so I'm open to ALL alternatives. Thanks.

    Mark

    P.S. I will start my own thread so as to not hijack the O.P.'s

    P.P.S. I saw at a site I was working at a machine in the back of a truck that extrudes the SS counter tops with the edges formed into them from a roll of 16 gauge so the only seams are at the corners. It was a pretty *****en setup.

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  • sailor
    replied
    400 amp air pack

    Thats what I was using intill I got my xmt 304, now I'm shooten for Dynasty200. I had a HF 251D-1 hooked to the air pack. Had to drop the engine rpm to get the amps low enough for tiggen the commercial ketchen jobs. Now I grab the 304. But em wanten a Dynasty especially for those light aluminum tig work. Point is theres alot of ways to do alot of things.

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  • rick-l
    replied
    OK Changing the scope a little (down to 48") would this work? I would make the front edge a 1" box (2 bends) and a 5" back splash in back.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=45876

    Would 20 ga. some how bonded to particle board make a good kitchen counter top?

    Is this a dumb idea and that is why you don't see it very often?

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  • fjk
    replied
    Originally posted by rick-l View Post
    If you see an ad that says "constructed of 18-8 stainless steel type 304-16" what does the 18-8 refer to?
    18-8 are the rough percentages of chromium and nickel, respectively
    (or is it nickel and chromium? i never remember :-).
    the rest is primarily iron & carbon (to make steel).

    the 18/8 gives you the rough properties of the steel.
    type 304 tells you the details
    (if you look 'em up in an appropriate reference, of course)

    frank

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Originally posted by rick-l View Post
    reviving an old thread but do you think something like this

    http://www.ch601.org/tools/bendbrake/brakeplans.pdf

    would bend 16 ga 304 stainless across 6 feet?

    If you see an ad that says "constructed of 18-8 stainless steel type 304-16" what does the 18-8 refer to?
    Plain and simple no. Good idea but SS is pretty tough and 6' of 16 ga doesn't help any...Bob
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainless_steel

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  • rick-l
    replied
    reviving an old thread but do you think something like this

    http://www.ch601.org/tools/bendbrake/brakeplans.pdf

    would bend 16 ga 304 stainless across 6 feet?

    If you see an ad that says "constructed of 18-8 stainless steel type 304-16" what does the 18-8 refer to?

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  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Bert!

    Originally posted by Bert View Post
    Oh btw, I have a Dynasty 200DX setup (air-cooled torch), but I don't know if all the places would have the proper outlet for it, especially at the residential places...Any machine you used that is 110 that could do the job?
    bert
    Bert, did you ever work on the countertops?
    Your Dynasty is the ideal machine for this type of work. Or any small DC TIG unit, like the little Maxstars that Admweld suggested. Don't waste your time with a MIG unit if you have the 110V TIG option.

    Good fit-up is critical, because once you start blowing holes you're in a world of hurt. You can weld outside corners without filler, which will make for easier post weld clean up.

    Practice practice practice on some scrap- both welding and polishing. You will learn that the polishing is just as hard as the welding, and should be given respect. You'll see. I wouldn't try to weld and buff out any butt joints, as they will only give you problems. Design accordingly, and use a press brake to form things as much as possible.

    Good luck!

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Originally posted by arky View Post
    straight argon(industrial grade) is all you need
    Straight Argon works better for alum. Stainless needs a few other gasses mixed in the bottle to preform right on SS. It will work but the bead will be high and big and not flow out right something you wouldn't want on your countertop where everyone will see it. Just my .02... Bob

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  • arky
    replied
    straight argon(industrial grade) is all you need

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  • Bert
    replied
    thanks arcdawg!
    One of my friends brought in a 4 metal SS shelf. I'm going to clean all the crud on it and practice!!
    bert

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  • arcdawg
    replied
    fuse tig the seams. Done tons of stainless work and all I have ever done is fuse it. My old shop had a 12ft wide hydrolic brake and we bent them up in house to avoid having to use seam sealer. You do not want to use that in this application. It will collect food and crap and defeet the purpose of having S.S. countertops.

    Get the stuff bent up then do the welding and finishing yourself.

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