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  • Newbie with a Question

    Hello all, been lurking on here for a few months off and on, just now registered as I have a real important question. I just bought an arc welder, a Forney C5 for 30$, and have begun to weld with it. Can lay super nice beads with 7014 on flat steel, but when I try a lap joint I have a huge crease down the middle. Have tried going slower, faster, varying closeness of electrode, ect. Am I missing something or what? Would really like to get this down since I can get a 7 dollar/hour raise at my summer job if I can pass their vert. weld tests. Thanks in advance, and be ready for more questions as I am sure I will have many to follow.

    Mike K.

  • #2
    I'm not the best stick welder here by any means, but I can't picture what you mean by a crease down the middle of the welded lap joint. Can you take and attach a picture?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by brn2hnt View Post
      Hello all, been lurking on here for a few months off and on, just now registered as I have a real important question. I just bought an arc welder, a Forney C5 for 30$, and have begun to weld with it. Can lay super nice beads with 7014 on flat steel, but when I try a lap joint I have a huge crease down the middle. Have tried going slower, faster, varying closeness of electrode, ect. Am I missing something or what? Would really like to get this down since I can get a 7 dollar/hour raise at my summer job if I can pass their vert. weld tests. Thanks in advance, and be ready for more questions as I am sure I will have many to follow.

      Mike K.
      Pictures we need pictures

      Comment


      • #4
        Are you going for your 7014 or 7018 license? 7018 is what everyone is asking for on this end...
        bert

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        • #5
          Pictures

          I agree with the other guys, we need pictures as I'm not sure what you are trying to describe. Dave

          Comment


          • #6
            Here's a pic for you guys. I am using 7014 because it starts easy and runs good on ac. Once I get some more practice, I was going to use the 7018 at school.

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            • #7
              Hey brn2hnt i think you better start with some 6011 rods and learn how to start an arc and hold a proper arc length Those 7014 rods are good rods for their purpose, must have clean metal and a good machine to burn them. Looks to me like you are not welding hot enough on the amp side and these rods are not for a beginner, it is hard to see your weld pool and you better know where you are welding at.Yes i agree they leave a good bead appearance,practice,practice practice and eventuaully you will figure it out

              Comment


              • #8
                brn2hnt

                At first glance, it appears to me that you have a couple of issues. 1 It doesn't appear as the amps are high enough, try burning a little hotter and 2. by the amount of spatter it doesn't appear as the metal is clean enough. 7014 does burn nice once you get the hang of it but it can also be tempormental. I would suggest trying to practice with some 6011 as its a very good multi purpose rod, and burns well on dirty metal. once you get good with the 6011 go back to the 7014s and practice, practice, practice.... Getting control of the weld pool is the biggest problem for beginners, once you figure out the weld pool you should be alright. Dave

                Comment


                • #9
                  what do you mean by getting ahold of the weld pool ??
                  i realy need to get out and give stick a try also, so what should i be looking for in the pool?? can you compare it to MIG or TIG so i have some idea of what i am looking for, or is it just a question of keeping the stick in the leading edge ?? is the shielding flux going to show in the pool as well?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When I think of weld pool, I think of the molting puddle right at the end of the electrode, You can tell what your weld will look like by watching the puddle, slow down, speed up, too hot, too cold, change angle, which ever. To me its the same for all the common welding procedures, MIG would be at the end of the electrode[wire] and TIG would be the place you have heated making it molting to add filler, notice its not molting ahead of or behind the puddle. Its also the only "wet" looking spot, especially with aluminum and the TIG. The flux on stick electrodes are for shielding the weld same as the gas is on MIG or TIG and, if I am correct, will show up as slag on top to be chipped off.
                    Just my opinion of course, if somebody has a different definition please share.
                    Last edited by HMW; 05-14-2007, 08:24 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Hmw

                      Thanks for not making me do all that typing to explain as that is exactly what I was referring to. Dave

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                      • #12
                        Glad I could help

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                        • #13
                          Molten Weld Puddle

                          The only thing I could add is that while you are watching the shiny molten puddle immediately next to the electrode, you can also see the colour change in the weld metal next to the puddle as it 'freezes'. When you learn to watch both you will be able to keep track of where you are in terms of proper fusion & eliminating undercut at the toes of the weld, and also where you have been in terms of how much weld metal has been deposited and how wide the bead is.

                          Some quick tips as you learn - before starting your welder put an electrode in the holder, position yourself over the workpiece and pay real close attention to the angles. Electrode angle should be 1/2 of joint angle, so when welding butt welds (180 degrees) electrode should be 90 degrees to seam when viewed from end. Next to check in electrode inclination angle. For most SMAW procedures, you will want a backhand technique which has your electrode pointing approx. 15 to 20 degrees opposite to the direction of travel or back into the puddle where you came from. This is viewed 90 degrees to the weld. When you get a handle on this, then work on short arc and long arc lengths and learn what they do.

                          Just practice. You'll get it. We all had to start somewhere. Some of my first welds looked like someone was flinging monkey sh*t with a slingshot!!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            i understood what the weld pool was i was refering to what did you mean by getting ahold of it?? as in did you mean lerning to drive it around where you wanted it or what it should look like and so forth. but iyt looks like all aply.
                            i realy gotta get off my but and give this stuff a try. seems like stick can be verry usefull to know, even with MIG & TIG already as an option.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              "as in did you mean learning to drive it around "


                              Thats funny !! but actually true

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