Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

MIG Question

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • MIG Question

    Having trouble seeing the weld puddle because of the nozzle. At what
    possition should the nozzle be while welding 14 gage square tubing? When looking at the bead the nozzle head is in the way. The Miller supply store said
    to hold the nozzle at the 5 oclock possition and always weld from left to right if
    I am right handed. It's just hard getting use to welding MIG after stick welding
    for 20 years. Thought maybe there is a better way? Thanks
    Last edited by Duck; 04-10-2007, 08:23 PM.

  • #2
    Same angles as on thicker stuff, try running 3/4 stick out at 15 degrees or so. 14 ga is thin stuff. Just welded 5in dia entension on scraper muffle pipe with .030 wire and spool gun.

    Comment


    • #3
      You have to be able to see your puddle. Position the gun to push in a position that you can view your arc & bead.

      Comment


      • #4
        Gun technique

        At work we weld primarily with .035 hardwire and I find the best results are yielded with 3/8 to 5/8 stickout (from the tip, not the nozzle ) and about a 15 degree push angle. In some cases when you need a little more penetration and/or build up a drag technique will work too. As for seeing the puddle I find watching from behind to work the best as long as you can still track the seem, it gives you a better idea of what the weld turning out like. It is just a matter of positioning yourself in a position to see. Anybody who says you should always be comfortable while welding is spoiled

        Comment


        • #5
          You can be comfortable while welding?? How? I've never experianced this phenominon you speak of. I come home everyday from work all banged up and sore as can be.

          Comment


          • #6
            I am right handed and usually weld right to left...sorta, most of the time, . like others said pushing is easier. Sometimes on a crack where I have cleaned it real good, I'll mark the crack with soap stone or a white out pen.

            Comment


            • #7
              Gmaw

              There are several different techniques so don't let someone tell you it's only good one way. Pushing the puddle gives you different penetration and buildup that pulling the puddle (forgive me, it's late) Also, try some of the different weave patterns like a zig-zag or little circles or the stepped pattern. Most think MIG is just aim and pull the trigger but there's really much more to it. It doesn't hurt to find a good book or read the Miller articles on MIG welding.
              GOod Luck!

              Comment


              • #8
                Welding in corners, right handed,pulling from left to right in little circles works best for me.
                bert

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Anti-GMAW View Post
                  You can be comfortable while welding?? How? I've never experianced this phenominon you speak of. I come home everyday from work all banged up and sore as can be.
                  One of the first things I was taught as a welder was safety.
                  second thing ''In order to make sound weldments you have to position ones self in as comfortable position as posible thats part of welder technique''

                  So with that being said before I attack a joint or groove,I look at the best posible way to go about doing it.

                  everyone should remember welding isnt a race... QUALITY WELDMENTS TAKE TIME
                  HOPE i HELPED
                  Dave
                  strive for perfection..but be wiling to accept EXCELLENCE

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Aircraft Welder View Post
                    There are several different techniques so don't let someone tell you it's only good one way. Pushing the puddle gives you different penetration and buildup that pulling the puddle (forgive me, it's late) Also, try some of the different weave patterns like a zig-zag or little circles or the stepped pattern. Most think MIG is just aim and pull the trigger but there's really much more to it. It doesn't hurt to find a good book or read the Miller articles on MIG welding.
                    GOod Luck!
                    Well to me I agree mig is aim and squeeze.
                    IT takes little to no operator skill to do,
                    the most complicated part is setting up and trouble shooting of the machine.
                    Also the easiest process out there and with pulsed its even easier.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by weldone View Post
                      Well to me I agree mig is aim and squeeze.
                      IT takes little to no operator skill to do,
                      the most complicated part is setting up and trouble shooting of the machine.
                      Also the easiest process out there and with pulsed its even easier.

                      Aim and squeeze! No operator skill???

                      Hmmm..

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Aim and squeeze eh?

                        There is so much more to MIG welding than aiming and squeezing. In fact, the only thing that is easy is screwing up. MIG is the only process where you can have an entire weld that is cold and still look acceptable without close ispection. If you can't TIG properly you will know it, and if a stick weld is cold there will be definite signs. Technique does matter, if you don't know what you are doing your welds will not be a strong as they could be. Luckily a little practice and mabye some instruction and you will be on your way to making quality welds.

                        On the topic of comfort. Yes comfort does make it easier to make good welds, it is not always realistic. In the real world you will often have to put yourself in uncomfortable positions to get the job done. The ability to concentrate, stay steady and lay a nice bead while standing with one leg on a stool, the other on a saw horse and leaning on a wobley weldment are the mark of a truly great welder .

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks

                          Amen BroBen!!!! Thanks for your response

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Just aim and squeeze?

                            Ha.

                            Ha ha ha.

                            Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha . . . . . .

                            Ok, now that I've stopped laughing, back to the OP's question. What can help depending on your gun is to slice a little off the end of the nozzle. Flux core wires generally run more stickout than solid cores (for me at least) and most nozzles seem to be designed for both (and extend beyond the contact tip a good bit).

                            If the nozzle extends beyond the contact tip, I slice enough off of it so the nozzle is even with the contact tip. Makes it easier to see the puddle (for me at least) and never had a problem with shielding coverage. If you switch back to flux core you don't really need a nozzle anyway and it's not hard to judge the stickout even with the nozzle sliced this way.
                            Last edited by phila.renewal; 04-16-2007, 08:49 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by shorerider16 View Post
                              There is so much more to MIG welding than aiming and squeezing. In fact, the only thing that is easy is screwing up. MIG is the only process where you can have an entire weld that is cold and still look acceptable without close ispection. If you can't TIG properly you will know it, and if a stick weld is cold there will be definite signs. Technique does matter, if you don't know what you are doing your welds will not be a strong as they could be. Luckily a little practice and mabye some instruction and you will be on your way to making quality welds.

                              On the topic of comfort. Yes comfort does make it easier to make good welds, it is not always realistic. In the real world you will often have to put yourself in uncomfortable positions to get the job done. The ability to concentrate, stay steady and lay a nice bead while standing with one leg on a stool, the other on a saw horse and leaning on a wobley weldment are the mark of a truly great welder .
                              As it goes you can have cold good lookin welds with no fusion in any process.
                              that may look good to the eye but cant pass any type of mechanical test.
                              But out of all the processes its still the easiest by far.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X
                              Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.