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Help me pick a stick welder

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  • Help me pick a stick welder

    Hey guys, i am looking for a stick welder to purchase some time in the near future.

    One of you recommenced the Hobart Stickmate AC/DC and the Maxstar 150 S, i am looking for more options.

    I am just getting into stick welding i'll only be doing this as a hobby.

    What i look for:
    Around $600
    easy to maintain
    115V would be better
    something thats user friendly
    and can weld 1/4" mild steel

    Thanks in advance!

  • #2
    whoops posted in wrong topic area, sorry!

    Comment


    • #3
      welder

      Hey
      Go ahead and turn loose of that green and get the best. I have a Miller 600 which is very expensive but worth it. I got a little brake on mine in 1989 for $2500.00. I don't know what they sell for now. But if you want just a buzz box then a Hobart or if Miller makes one it would be good. Gil

      Comment


      • #4
        I think you are really limiting your options with 115v, unless you go with the Maxstar. Even with the Max, you are still only getting 100 amps. Now, with the right prep you can still weld 1/4". Personally, I would go with a good old 230v AC/DC buzzbox, which you can find for under your price limit (which will do single pass 1/4" DC and 1/2" AC welds at max amperage). Hobart/Miller and Lincoln offer competively priced products, and I have had good success with a Lincoln 225/125 AC/DC unit.

        I was in the same boat as you a few months ago, and I lucked into my Lincoln stick welder. I picked it up new in the box for under $300, and couldn't be happier with it. Once you go with 230v units, you won't look back! The question is, do you have reliable access to 230v?

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the reply guys.

          Well, i am going to use this welder in my home's garage, so no, i don't have a 230W connection.

          What's the model of the Lincon that your using?

          Comment


          • #6
            The model number is K1297, and here's a link:

            http://www.mylincolnelectric.com/Cat...eet.asp?p=2494

            To be honest, I'm not sure if the major names are offering a 115v stick welders (with the exception of the Maxstar, and even with it you get the highest performance with 230v). I couldn't find one on Miller, Hobart, or Lincoln's websites, but I do know they are offered. In fact, Century may offer one, and I am pretty sure Harbor Freight carries some variation of a 115v stick unit(but I really cannot comment on the quality). If you have a panel box in your garaage, you can always add a dedicated 220/230v plug near the box. That's exactly what I had to do, and only required a short length of appropriate cable, 50amp female plug, and 50amp breaker.

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            • #7
              Thanks Jason, i might just go with the one that you have.

              As far as the 230v connection, i have to look into the price of that, i think the breaker is in my basement tho, and the garage is not attached to the house as it was my dad's machine shop.

              Comment


              • #8
                Even if the garage isn't attached to the house, it should have power coming to it in one form or another. If it does have power, then it should have a panel box (all though I have seen some without). Its very possible the garage is wired off the panel box in the basement, but let's hope not. Tapping into the panel is relatively straightforward, but should not be taken lightly.

                Now, if there isn't a panel box, you will need to use some type of extension cord to get 230v. Depending on how far the garage is from the house, this might present a problem. The farther you are, the heavier gauge wire you will need and it can get expensive! I made a cord out of 6w3, and I think its now going for $2 per foot (if not more). Hopefully you have a panel box in the garage you can tap into, which will make the entire project a lot simpler. Check your garage and see if you might have a panel box.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ThunderRobo View Post
                  Thanks Jason, i might just go with the one that you have.

                  As far as the 230v connection, i have to look into the price of that, i think the breaker is in my basement tho, and the garage is not attached to the house as it was my dad's machine shop.
                  If it was a machine shop, it may have 230. Did your dad have a 230 compressor, or other high voltage tools?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Goodhand View Post
                    If it was a machine shop, it may have 230. Did your dad have a 230 compressor, or other high voltage tools?
                    All our machines ran off the normal 115 sockets, including out lathe and our small Mill.

                    Thanks Jason, i'll check my garage again tomorrow, it might be hiding behind one our or tool boxes.

                    This fourms rocks!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just let us know what you find, and we'll help you the best we can!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Goodhand View Post
                        If it was a machine shop, it may have 230. Did your dad have a 230 compressor, or other high voltage tools?
                        Are you talking single phase 220? or three phase 230?
                        Very big difference.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The Lincoln 225 has served me well, love that thing. It will be worth your while to wire the shop with 230v, you'll be glad you did!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            got two gas rigs that need new homes

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