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Motorcycle Lift Table material ???

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  • Motorcycle Lift Table material ???

    I am going to be fabricating this lift table.

    http://www.afabonline.com/table_lift_plans.htm

    I have a questions about the strength of the metal called for in the plans. Meaning with my limited experience I have to say the metal is overkill. I'm not lifting full dressed Road Kings. I am lifting 4-500 lb Sportbikes. The table top is 30" x 96" I will be dropping it down to 24" x 84"

    Metal Spec'ed in the plans. For Example:

    The base is composed 4 sticks of 2" x 2" x 1/4" x 92" Angle

    The Table frame is 4 sticks of 2" x 2" x 3/16" x 92" Angle

    Most of the box tubing is 2 x 2 x 1/4" wall

    The safety stop braces are 1 1/4 x 1 1/4 x x1/8" wall

    I am looking to put it on a diet. Two reasons, weight savings and cost savings. I want to be able to move the lift around my garage and lean it against the wall when not in use.

    Would replacing all the 2x2 angle with 1x2 14q (or even 16g) box still have enough strength?

    Would replacing the all the box tubing to 1 1/4" x 1/8" wall be sufficient?

    Thanks

    And yes it will be welded with a Miller 135. I would have a bigger welder, but I dont have 230. So I am happy with this for now. It has welded quite a lot and for its size and price. It cant be beat.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Synergy View Post
    I am going to be fabricating this lift table.

    http://www.afabonline.com/table_lift_plans.htm

    I have a questions about the strength of the metal called for in the plans. Meaning with my limited experience I have to say the metal is overkill. I'm not lifting full dressed Road Kings. I am lifting 4-500 lb Sportbikes. The table top is 30" x 96" I will be dropping it down to 24" x 84"

    Metal Spec'ed in the plans. For Example:

    The base is composed 4 sticks of 2" x 2" x 1/4" x 92" Angle

    The Table frame is 4 sticks of 2" x 2" x 3/16" x 92" Angle

    Most of the box tubing is 2 x 2 x 1/4" wall

    The safety stop braces are 1 1/4 x 1 1/4 x x1/8" wall

    I am looking to put it on a diet. Two reasons, weight savings and cost savings. I want to be able to move the lift around my garage and lean it against the wall when not in use.

    Would replacing all the 2x2 angle with 1x2 14q (or even 16g) box still have enough strength?

    Would replacing the all the box tubing to 1 1/4" x 1/8" wall be sufficient?

    Thanks

    And yes it will be welded with a Miller 135. I would have a bigger welder, but I dont have 230. So I am happy with this for now. It has welded quite a lot and for its size and price. It cant be beat.
    I dont think anyone can answer this without the plans in front of them, I know I would not venture to guess. The lifts we had at our shop were very heavily built, and Im glad they were, if they start getting too flexible its not much fun. Especially when your sitting on the bike, thats on the lift! For safety reasons I woudlnt skimp on strength.

    -Aaron

    Comment


    • #3
      Agree with last thread.

      I have a prolift which seems to be alot heavier construction than the one you are looking at. I still did a few modifications to it for strength. Even when I put my sportster on it I want it as solid as possible. While working on the bike you would be supprised how much torque you will put on the lift. The last thing you want is to have the lift to give way or heaven forbid fall over sideways. One thing I would absolutely do is put some sort of outriggers on it and a much better hold down method instead of the locks on those casters. Being light is nice for moving but safety is the prime issue in my mind. It is pretty easy to come up with a dolly of some sort for moving. I would also do something much more substantial for the bracket that holds the unit up while lifted. I would never rely on that floor jack to hold.
      good luck with it. Carl

      Comment


      • #4
        Hey guys i have made a lift for my friend motorcycle and i made it from heavier tube then that and hes glad .

        Comment


        • #5
          Ok here is a rough design of the base. This should give you guys a better idea than the pics. This design is using the ideal material for weight and cost. I can make adjustments, reinforcements, etc. Thanks for the input.
          Attached Files

          Comment


          • #6
            they are lifting a lot more bike than you thats for shore. and as the others have said its not going to hurt to be a little too solid but the other way around could be disasterous. on the other hand you are using boxed where they are using angle so that should alow for some ajustment without too much truble. you also have to keep in mind they dont want to end up getting sued due to a failure.

            Comment


            • #7
              Fun- Good points. I know if I was selling 50 buck plans for a motorcycle lift, that lifts bikes upwards of $20-$30K. I would over-engineer it also, for liability. I am looking to eliminate the automotive jack lifting, for a hydraulic system. Either 115v motor to a hydro pump or a hydro-pneumatic foot pedal system with a 2-3" bore cylinder and around 18" stroke. If something comes up on Ebay I will pick it up.

              Comment


              • #8
                be shore to show us the lift when you get it going.
                if you do a serch you will.....or should find one some one built here befor. it might have beem on the motor sports board though not shore , i just remember seeing it.
                best of luck to ya.

                Comment


                • #9
                  You know for $299.00 you buy cheap one at HF....
                  http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=91764

                  We use the HandyLift and love it. It is what is used in most bike shops (only $700 or so). Its not worth wrecking your bike or loosing a finger/hand for 300 - 700 bucks ( Just my 2 cents)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I am not too concerned with my metal plans diet. Take a look at this ghetto lift. I know my fabrication and welding is stronger than doug fir and black pipe. These plans were sold on Ebay.
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      yep add the 15% off coopon at HF and its hard to build one for less.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I may be alittle late on this but I bought these plans and built this table. the table is well thought out and the plans are easy to follow. It is very heavy duty and sure it is probably over kill on the material but if you are selling these plans, you know you have to cover your a$$ for liability reasons. I modified mine alittle so it will roll around on casters. Had to put some screw down feet on it to keep it from rolling away from me while I was pushing the bike up on it. Ask me how I figured that one out. I had about $200 tyied up in materials. The table "Fun" talked about will probably work fine but I was looking for a usable work table when not being used for the motorcycle. I have been using mine for a while but resently cut it up and I'm in the process of designing one more like the Kendon motorcyle lift. I need one that is lighter and easy to lift up and stand against the wall. I ended up using mine more for a work table then a motorcyle table and I think we all know that if you have an empty flat spot in your garage, stuff manages to get piled up on it. I need the space when not working on the bike. I have a bunch of alum. and recently bought a spool gun for the mig so I'm going to build the next on out of alum. and use a sissor type lift system. Saves space when in the down possition.
                        Attached Files

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Synergy,
                          nice pic of the ghetto lift, hey don't know it!!! They probably found it in Woodworkers magazine
                          Hey, I have a millermatic 135 and have a real hard time making a nice bead with anything over 1/8 thick! 3/16 didn't look good and I was told no way 1/4", unless I preheat the metal first. Using .030 flux cored wire. How thick metal are you welding together, wire size ?
                          thanks,
                          bert

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            JHCHOPPERS,
                            Where did you get yours? model, cost? Friend just got a softail, will your hold it without a problem?
                            thanks,
                            bert

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              We bought our direct from Handy Industries
                              http://www.handyindustries.com

                              But there are many other who make similar ones.
                              http://eagleequip.com/page/EE/PROD/LI-MC/603-038

                              Comment

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