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Removing a pin on front loader

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  • Removing a pin on front loader

    I got called out to a job to weld a clevis back onto the chrome shaft of a hydraulic cylinder, the reason it broke is because the 3" pin frooze into the arm of the loader, I welded a ring on the one end of the pin and attatched a ratchet binder to pull on the pin, on the opposite side I welded a pin, I then took my big rose bud torch and set my propane pressure at 50 lbs and my oxegen at about 60-70 psi.
    It did a great job at heating and then 3 guys took turns on swinging the sledge and to no avail it would not move, so I then got a torch and did the quench method to help break up the rust and it still would not come out.
    I then had to air arc, then chip, then air arc and chip so on and so on untill I dug in 2-1/2" on each side and then the hydraulic clinder came down and now I had a 3" dia pin left in the arm of the loader that was still about 4-1/2 long.
    I then went back to trying to pull this pin out with the ratchet binder on one side, a drive pin welded to the other side for a sledge hammer and a big rose bud torch.
    Any way I am curiouse how long this job should take because it took me alot longer than I expected it to.
    I used about 40 1/4" carbon rods to arc all this out. using my 300 amp trail blazer.

  • #2
    I had to remove a bucket froma 966D once and both pins we frozen on the pivots. With a CAT oxygen lance, gouging, a 10lb sledge it took me about 9 hours to get them both out. I've seen pins on horizontal bailers at work fight with man and machine for 2 days till they finally won
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    I owe! I owe! so off to work I go!

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    • #3
      We have had success with these stubborn ones by taking a zip cut disc & opening one side then heating if necessary & removing it. V out to the bottom & reweld.Might need a die grinder to trim inside where weld penetrates to allow pin movement & if possible install grease zerk if you can find people who know what they are their for.
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      • #4
        There are several ways to get a pin out..
        1-Weld a frame to the arm and push it with a porta power
        2- cut a hole in it to relieve the stress and then push it out.
        3- heat the pin boss and then freeze the pin.

        If you had a big torch and you could cut into each end and then when it cooled you could get it out.

        If you had a Exo torch you could blow through it and then get it out.
        Air arcs aren't the greatest for blowing blind holes, Oxy acet will actually do more, especially compared to 1/4" carbons.

        What loader were you working on?
        Jeff

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        • #5
          When I worked on cranes, we used a Oxygen lance to get the stubborn pens out.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
            I got called out to a job to weld a clevis back onto the chrome shaft of a hydraulic cylinder, the reason it broke is because the 3" pin frooze into the arm of the loader, I welded a ring on the one end of the pin and attatched a ratchet binder to pull on the pin, on the opposite side I welded a pin, I then took my big rose bud torch and set my propane pressure at 50 lbs and my oxegen at about 60-70 psi.
            It did a great job at heating and then 3 guys took turns on swinging the sledge and to no avail it would not move, so I then got a torch and did the quench method to help break up the rust and it still would not come out.
            I then had to air arc, then chip, then air arc and chip so on and so on untill I dug in 2-1/2" on each side and then the hydraulic clinder came down and now I had a 3" dia pin left in the arm of the loader that was still about 4-1/2 long.
            I then went back to trying to pull this pin out with the ratchet binder on one side, a drive pin welded to the other side for a sledge hammer and a big rose bud torch.
            Any way I am curiouse how long this job should take because it took me alot longer than I expected it to.
            I used about 40 1/4" carbon rods to arc all this out. using my 300 amp trail blazer.
            You have sort of described the reason we bought a LARGe plasma cutter.

            The other treatment for those stuck pins is one heck of a big porta-power.

            We have both a 60 ton one that is hollow and a 100 ton model.
            I've used both. but the hollow one is kind of neat because you can put a driving rod right though the middle of it. --- thus you can pump up pressure to 60 tons, and then help it with a driving rod and a sledge hammer.

            to be sure our 100 ton portapower has a driving plate on the back of it, but the hammer force goes through the jack which perhaps isn't as good.

            Another possibility depending on how hard the pin is to relieve it by
            drilling it. If the pin can be drilled all the way through, then the fire
            axe works a lot better and you can cut some reliefes.

            but dont feel badly about working on it for days.----- And of course part of the problem is that the sledge hammer swells them up and makes the job even tougher.
            rvannatta
            www.vannattabros.com
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            • #7
              well by the time I welded the clevis on protected the chrome cylinder and ground the bore smooth to accept the new pin I had approx. 12 hrs.
              A friend of mine who is a portable welder like me said he could have done this job in about 3 hrs using his air arc but I cant see how.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
                A friend of mine who is a portable welder like me said he could have done this job in about 3 hrs using his air arc but I cant see how.
                Well, next time sub it out to him, flat rate, based on three hours. You charge the customer the twelve hours it actually takes, make out like a bandit on jobs like that.

                Almost every one of these jobs is different, you really can't predict the time. The big variable is how much time you waste trying to get it out in one piece, I find the older I get the less time I spend on these, I generally take a couple swings with the hammer then it's cutting torch and/or air-arc. I find if it's that hard getting the pin out it's usually not salvageable anyway, plus all the heat on the structure and sleeve can't be good for the machine.

                On something like this, if there's enough clearance, I usually try to cut the pin with a torch between the clevis and the frame, both sides if possible, drop the clevis out of the way, then pierce the pin left in the frame all the way through with a large (#6) cutting tip. Once it's pierced, you can sometimes drive it right out, other times you have to cut the hole out more.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
                  well by the time I welded the clevis on protected the chrome cylinder and ground the bore smooth to accept the new pin I had approx. 12 hrs.
                  A friend of mine who is a portable welder like me said he could have done this job in about 3 hrs using his air arc but I cant see how.
                  I'm still hauling tools to the job site at the 3 hour mark.
                  rvannatta
                  www.vannattabros.com
                  Miller Bobcat 225G
                  Miller Big 40 ('79 gasser)<gone>
                  Miller 375 Plasma cutter<gone>
                  Lincoln Vantage 400
                  Lincoln Pro-Cut 80

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                  • #10
                    Well I dont feel so bad after talking to you guys.
                    I have to agree that maybe the air arc wasnt the best tool for the job but I dont own a lance, I used one about 16 years ago it was called a arc air and I used it to cut through the side of the press but untill the other day I havent had a use for a lance.
                    The air arc works great for peeling welds when I vee groove thick weldment but I cant say the same about blind holes.

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                    • #11
                      If you can't blow it clean, it tends to pile carbon up in front of you, and it doesn't cut at all.

                      The other problem with blind holes is the hot air/metal has to go somewhere, usually right back in your face

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
                        A friend of mine who is a portable welder like me said he could have done this job in about 3 hrs using his air arc but I cant see how.
                        Funny how once the job is done, everyone could have done it Faster/Better/Cheaper....
                        Jeff

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                        • #13
                          When Air arcing in the blind hole calweld is right the carbon builds up in front of you, so I used my air hammer to go in and blast out the carbon between passes.

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                          • #14
                            When all else fails I drag out the slice torch(oxygen lance?)Ita a hollow tube about 2 ft long filled with little rods. Hook er up to a tank of oxygen, put on your hot wear, strike the arc and walla pushes right down the middle of the pin. We lovingly call it the volcano. But at any rate the real problem is the grease worms got in there and ate all the grease.

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                            • #15
                              I’ve taken my share of pins out of machinery, dirt-moving equipment, but hands down the majority would be crane booms! In my opinion the cost of “Never-Seez” (anti-seize) is priceless in this situation!

                              With out the aid of a crystal ball I’d like to know how in the world one would ever estimate how long it would take.


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