Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Coping pipe

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Coping pipe

    i know certain manufacturers made cutting guides and some ironworkers have tools that cut the pipe, but how do you do it manully, and how do you use the guides on angled pieces, bc i can see how they work on 90 degree joints but not on acute or obtuse angled joints

    thanks for any info

  • #2
    I'm not sure what you're asking, but this might be the answer:

    http://metalgeek.com/static/cope2.pcgi

    It will calculate a layout for coping tube to any angle and offset.
    - Heath

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by farmboy weldor
      i know certain manufacturers made cutting guides and some ironworkers have tools that cut the pipe, but how do you do it manully, and how do you use the guides on angled pieces, bc i can see how they work on 90 degree joints but not on acute or obtuse angled joints

      thanks for any info
      If you have a little more info you might get more in-depth responses. There are many ways to do this but having some parameters to start with always helps. What would you like to do? How much effort do you want to exert and what kind of costs are you considering.
      Dynasty 350DX
      Dynasty 200DX TigRunner
      MM 350P
      MM Passport Plus
      Spectrum 375 Extreme
      08' Trailblazer 302

      Comment


      • #4
        this isnt anything critical , i was just wondering how some of you guys do this whether with a guide or free hand,

        what i mean by coping is cutting the pipe to fit onto other pipes so they can be welded, like in a tube chassis or frame,

        but if you want specifics i guess maybe 1 1/2 to 2 steel pipe .125 thickness,

        but this is all hypothetical, i was just curious

        Comment


        • #5
          The last time I tried it I did it free hand with a 4.5 in grinder it was only two joints but very time consuming. .120 90deg with MIG it was close enough TIG would have been a mess.
          Joe
          wrench3047@gmail.com

          Comment


          • #6
            first lesson. Tubing is very different than pipe. Tube is measured by O.D. and pipe is measured by I.D.. this means a 2" pipe is larger in diameter than tubing of the same "size" by twice the wall thickness(which i believe is measured by a standard called schedule{ sched 40/80 ring a bell**).do a search on tubing notchers and you will find a few threads here on the subject. The cheapest way ive found is to purchase an old bridgeport miller from the local paper with a vise. There always going for under 300 dollars here in the bargainnews, for a beat up one yes, but good enough to cut pipe.
            Trailblazer 302g
            coolmate4
            hf-251d-1
            super s-32p
            you can never know enough

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by farmboy weldor
              this isnt anything critical , i was just wondering how some of you guys do this whether with a guide or free hand,

              what i mean by coping is cutting the pipe to fit onto other pipes so they can be welded, like in a tube chassis or frame,

              but if you want specifics i guess maybe 1 1/2 to 2 steel pipe .125 thickness,

              but this is all hypothetical, i was just curious
              There are many ways to do what you're describing, including the purchase of special tools for the purpose. However, if you go to the website that I suggested, plug in the OD of the pipe or tubing in question and the angle and offset that you desire, it will produce a PDF for you that you can print out and then use as a layout guide. From there, you can cope the tube or pipe with an OA torch or a plasma cutter. Clean it up with the grinding tool of choice. For a very tight fit, use a scrap piece of tube the diameter of what's being coped to and wrap a piece of sandpaper around it.
              - Heath

              Comment


              • #8
                that program is realy cool, too bad there isent a downloadable version

                farmboy weldor
                another option is to get a tube gage for the sizes you intend to use, most welding places carry them they are a bunch of pins conected to a ring you just set the pipe in place slide down the pins they will form the shap you need to cut the pipe to , then you slide it up mark it and cut.
                thanks for the help
                ......or..........
                hope i helped
                sigpic
                feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                JAMES

                Comment


                • #9
                  You can use a cut off saw i did it this way for years and there is a website that tells you the angles to cut the tube at i think it was on the hobart forum but dont quote me on that . I mill fit all my tubes but the cutoff saw method works great as well.
                  Miller aerowave full feature
                  Lincoln power mig 300 with prince gun
                  dynasty 200 dx
                  lincoln sp 135 plus
                  302 trailblazer
                  s22p12
                  powcon starcut
                  cp 400 metal spray

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You can buy/build a simple jig that allows you to use a hole saw in your drill press. Mount the tubing horizontally and drill down with the hole saw to create your profile. I think this is what you're asking for.

                    I know a guy that did all his rough joints this way for a tube frame airplane.

                    Here's a portable version:

                    http://www.jointjigger.com/

                    Might be a good opportunity to weld up a new jig.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X