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7014 verses 7018

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  • 7014 verses 7018

    One of my welding buddies swears by 7014 rods. From what I've learned here, most folks carry 6010/11 and 7018. My 1960s welding book titled "Modern Welding" doesn't even list a 7014. I currently keep 6011 and 6013 rods on hand but thought I might switch to 6010 and 7018. Does this sound about right and what is the diffence in the coating of a 7014 verses 7018?

    I do mostly pipe fence welding, gates and some occasional structural welding.
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  • #2
    6010 is a DC only rod while the 6011 is available in AC or DC versions. For what you are doing you do not need 7018 and it's rigid storage requirements. 7014 is an easy rod to learn with and makes nice beads with easily removed slag.

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    • #3
      7014 is not a low-hydrogen electrode, so it doesn't have the storage requirements that 7018 has, as mentioned. It's an iron-power flux so it has a good deposition rate, too. It's a helluva lot more useful and user-friendly than 6013. 6010 and 6011 are the only 60-series rods I need to run.

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      • #4
        Okay, so it looks like 6010 and 7014 are what I need to stock.

        By ridged storage requirements, I take it that you guys mean it will get eaten up a lot easier by moisture if I don't keep them stored properly?
        Millermatic 35
        Miller TB302G
        Ellis 1800
        Smith & Victor Torches
        Optrel Satellite
        Arcair K4000
        Ingersoll-Rand 175CFM Diesel Air Compressor
        Home Made Welding Trailer

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        • #5
          7018 and the higher tensile low-hy electrodes must be DRY or you risk hydrogen embittlement and cracked welds. Once the factory seal is broken, they must be stored in an electrode oven at a certain temperature. For this reason, they shouldn't be recommended to most weekend warriors except for instant usage from the factory-sealed containers. Old electrodes should be used for practice or non-structural stuff only.

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          • #6
            i bought some 7014 3/32 i cant get the hang of this stuff it seems to run so cold all the time is there any secrets for running this stuff .
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            • #7
              yup, use in the flat position. Its the easiest rod out their and I also recommend it for the weekend warrior.
              hre

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              • #8
                The 7014 is a great rod for irregular welding positions like runing an upward travel diagonal path. I have found a little long arc length works well with these rods. I use them a lot for general purpose welding around the farm as well as on galvanized fencing. They also work very well for filling gaps on poor fit ups.

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                • #9
                  7014 should not be used for uphill uphand work, but can be used for downhill downhand. My opinion, just use a 6010. When a 7014 is on a weldement that it can excell at, the rod will shine and give almost everybody great results. But, get it out of its proper element and you can be pulling hair out for a while. for this reason I find 6011 / 6010 more versatile. One nice thing about the 7014 is the easy to chip slag.
                  hre

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Coalsmoke
                    7014 should not be used for uphill uphand work, but can be used for downhill downhand. My opinion, just use a 6010. When a 7014 is on a weldement that it can excell at, the rod will shine and give almost everybody great results. But, get it out of its proper element and you can be pulling hair out for a while. for this reason I find 6011 / 6010 more versatile. One nice thing about the 7014 is the easy to chip slag.

                    Coalsmoke,

                    For anything structural or critical I would not use a 7014 in any position. To me it falls into that 6013 general purpose (around the house/farm) welding rod class. It does do a nice job on galvanized fencing. MY preference is 6010/6011 and 7018 depending on the application. Sorry if my previous post was misleading.

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                    • #11
                      Hawk, can you get a decent bead on a vet. uphill with 7014? I haven't tried with 7014 for some time, but, when I started with a company a few years back, all they had was 7014, and I was their only welder, which was bad, b/c I didn't know squat. Long story short, got some adivce on the 7014 and was told by a "professional" not to even bother wasting time trying to get a decent vertical up bead with 7014, but instead that it was easier to do multiple downhill downhand passes. I tried 7014 a few times after that but it was always like trying to build a snowman in the middle of july, not going to happen. It sounds as though you have had better results at it. I agree, like 6013, if not critical and you can make it work, have at it. Just sounds like extra work to me
                      hre

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                      • #12
                        garybdavis,

                        I have always liked 7014 since it worked well with metal that had some rust, paint, or oil on it. I donít think it has the penetration of 7018 but is more forgiving to start, i.e. less sticking. Also, the 7014 is easy to restrike where many times it takes a tap with 7018 on some rock or concrete, or bust the coating off with a glove a little. Personally, I never could get 7014 to run vertical, but that doesnít mean much as I am not a real weldor.
                        Hope itís OK to tell a long story. I had a three month job to break up concrete walls, porches, sidewalks, etc. at a mental hospital so they could put in ramps for the handicapped. The equipment dealer where I dealt got a large experimental hydraulic buster from the Howard Hughes Tool Co. to test. He gave it to me with the instruction that if anything bad happened with it I was to call him immediately. After probably misusing the thing by prying, I broke the bit which had to be some kind of special metal and at least 4Ē in diameter. I called the dealer and that was the only bit since the tool was experimental, so I was shut down without it. Well, I took it home that night, veed it out almost to a point with torch and grinder, clamped it in some angle to try to keep it straight, and welded it back together with many, many passes of 7014. Figured I didnít have anything to lose. So, the next morning we went back to work with the thing expecting it to break any minute. Anyway, these two guys in cowboy hats and suits come up to me. Itís was not unusual on the mental hospital grounds to see people that are not dressed the same as the locals. Turns out these guys flew in special overnight on a private jet to see and analyze the broken part. I had to visit Texas years later just to see if everyone there was as mad, mean, and nasty as these two fellows were. The tool bit never broke after that and we did give it a workout. Just lucky I guess.

                        Disclaimer - Please listen to the experts on the board. My stuff is just from personal experience. No official schoolin or book learnin you know.

                        Twocentsworth

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