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Floor joist girders

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  • Floor joist girders

    can you use 14 guage 4x4 square tubing with 8” receivers and purlins to use as girders and floor joist? The 4x4’s would be in the ground, All welded?
    Maybe 16” center purlins covered with plywood sub flooring?

  • #2
    All depends on what's going onto the floor, of course.

    I'm thinking we should have a default instant reply to all first posts from now on that immediately says: "Depends. Tell us more." Don't take that personally; you'll see what I mean when you stick around.
    Last edited by MAC702; 12-18-2017, 08:15 PM.

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    • #3
      What's the project?

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      • #4
        I live in a flood zone. I am required to build a raised floor. I want to build a workshop for woodworking. The shop would be contain woodworking tools such as table Sauls planers things like that. Also a wood stove and lumber etc.... about 4’ above grade.

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        • #5
          I have worked construction with lumber but am sorta new to steel, it’s spans and load bearings. Live loads, etc. I want something that will last, low maintenance. I’ve been told by a local supplier just receivers and purlins would be ok. But, I wanted more expert advise. Hoping someone can steer me straight.

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          • #6
            Check your local building code requirements.
            Lincoln Idealarc 250
            Miller Bobcat 250
            Thermal Arc Hefty 2 feeder
            Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52
            Torchmate CNC table

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            • #7
              I'm still a little fuzzy on what you're trying to do, besides build a shop that is. I live in a flood area too....well, only when the corps of engineers opens the flood gates at least....I'm not sure 4x4s going to the ground for supports would be sufficient. Like snoeproe said, check the local building codes. Granted you're not holding up the 10th Mongolian Horde and I tend to over engineer things, but around here, even decks and porches are generally supported by more than a 4x4. Lots of wood frame structures last a long time and are pretty maintenance free.

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              • #8
                When using unfamiliar materials such as a 4 x 4 x 14 ga. T.S. as a floor joist, the building inspector is likely going to make you get sealed engineered drawings that are stamped from a P.E.

                Will what you are doing work, yes, depending on how far you want to span, without telling us how far you plan to span a given member and what type of centers you plan to spacing them, know one can properly answer your question...

                There is a rule of thumb that we use when deciding what size and weight beam to use on a given span.
                A 4" member will span 8'.
                A 5" member will span 10'
                A 6" member will span 12'
                A 8" member will span 16'
                So once we figure what height member we want to go with, we then figure out what lb, per ft. the member needs to be to handle a given load !!!! other things that are critical ( Aside from what your centers you will be running on ) are bridging and X- bracing.

                So long story short, the additional cost of using wood verses steel, the cost savings of the steel will be offset by the $ 1,200.00 cost to get a sealed engineered drawing, its very seldom that a P. E. engineer will even talk to you for less than that.

                Good luck, I hope this has been helpful advice.

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                • #9
                  Question anaweed. Thank you guys.

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