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Thunderbolt & Thunderbolt XL transformers

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  • #16
    Thank you for looking up residential use of aluminium wiring and correcting your previous statements. But still not showing any related failures in the scope of the thread. Chances are, the electrical panel in your house is full of aluminum to copper connections. It's been known for over fifty years now how to do it properly and safely.

    Are you saying there is even one person out there who opened up their welding machine, saw red-shellac on aluminum and said, "Cool! My machine is copper!" Do you think a person that would do so is actually a person that knows the differences?

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    • #17
      Forney 235AC\DC transformer/choke unit uses covered insulation stranded aluminium wire for primary, secondary transformer windings and choke windings using white colored insulation.

      so what is the best solution for the front lead terminal connection where the electrical path is aluminum to threaded nut to brass connector?

      Welding machines that live in the desert do not have the corrosion issues that welding machines that live on the coast or rainy demographics like Oregon.

      Will pull the panel tomorrow, since need to install 50 amp 220 VAC nema 6-50r receptacle.
      Would guess underground feed line is AL.

      All the breaker slots should be Cu-Al plated alloy to accept aluminum or copper wire.
      Are metal connections on the breakers Cu-Al?
      Noticed the metal mounting plate on the flush mount Levetron 6-50r receptacle is stamped Cu-Al

      Need to find coated 1/2"-20 Cu-Al nuts to fit the brass lead terminals, maybe the best solution...good luck with that

      Have noticed the 220 VAC welders are three prong rather than four prong.

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      • #18
        Yep.

        Welding machines have no need for the neutral conductor, just the two hots. Plus the ground and they just need a 3-prong plug.

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        • #19
          This sounds like a serious case of "a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing."

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