Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Millermattic 211 vs Multimatic 215 as a MIG

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Millermattic 211 vs Multimatic 215 as a MIG

    I'm looking for my first welder and pretty much have it decided on a Millermattic 211 or Multimatic 215. Right now after rebate and discounts the price difference between the 211 and 215 is $130 (which I'll gladly pay for the upgraded display). Does the 215 give up anything as a MIG compared to the 211? I've been learning as much as I can and comparing the specs, but to my novice eyes all I'm seeing is that the 215 has a max 120v amperage 5 less than the 211 (125 vs 130).

    I'd appreciate any thoughts.

  • #2
    Which ever one you get, you'll want to run some good power to it so you can take advantage of the 230v capability. If you're only going to be welding on 115v, you'll be very limited and not happy with it after a couple days of welding.

    Comment


    • #3
      Ditto on that
      Neither one has much duty cycle on any voltage.
      They are both cute tho.
      I would be partial to the 215 and get the tig kit so you could learn that for almost no more money.
      It is essentially 2 machines in one.
      Mig-wise they seem pretty close.
      As a pro I would be looking at the Hobart 210......(not a toy, and cheaper) Just sayin'

      www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
      Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
      MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
      Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
      Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

      Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
      Miller 30-A Spoolgun
      Miller WC-115-A
      Miller Spectrum 300
      Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
      Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

      Comment


      • #4
        I would go for the Multimatic 215. The price isn't much different and you might want to go tigging later on.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a Hobart 210 (a few years old now and rebadged as an autoarc....came off the Matco tool truck I think) and has had miles of wire through it, nary a problem. The one thing that irritates me about it is I have to go to tractor supply to get tips and stuff, then I end up browsing and ultimately buying more stuff that I really need.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
            I have a Hobart 210 (a few years old now and rebadged as an autoarc....came off the Matco tool truck I think) and has had miles of wire through it, nary a problem. The one thing that irritates me about it is I have to go to tractor supply to get tips and stuff, then I end up browsing and ultimately buying more stuff that I really need.
            ....yeah, but you're in good company--we almost all do that... :-)

            but, now and then you find a deal that makes it worth it. Stopped after church a few weeks ago and got two Dewalt knotted wire "root pass cleaning " brushes for $4 each. I asked If they were mismarked, and they told me no. Next week they were $14. And, now they're building a new store right across the river from my house! No more 25 minute drive to get there! This may not be a good thing....

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
              Ditto on that
              Neither one has much duty cycle on any voltage.
              They are both cute tho.
              I would be partial to the 215 and get the tig kit so you could learn that for almost no more money.
              It is essentially 2 machines in one.
              Mig-wise they seem pretty close.
              As a pro I would be looking at the Hobart 210......(not a toy, and cheaper) Just sayin'
              For a hobbyist, the duty cycle is "effectively" much higher than rated since no hobbyist will be doing production style work that would actually exercise the full duty cycle continuously, IMO. For random odd jobs where one has to re-position, move abouts, join up several other parts, backstep the weld sequence, etc, I would be willing to bet a $3 bill that the "effective" duty cycle would be closer to 50-70% because all those little breaks add up and give the machine some breathing time. Also, a nice cool ambient temperature of 70-75F will allow even more duty cycle compared to the rated spec of 104F. I am assuming that Miller rates their machines @ 104F, but then again the manual doesn't say so, so I could be totally wrong on that.
              HTP Invertig221 D.V. Water-cooled
              Eastwood MIG175 w/spoolgun
              Eastwood Versacut40 Plasma cutter

              Comment


              • #8
                I would go for the multimatic 215...Bob
                Bob Wright

                Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
                http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

                Comment


                • #9
                  What about the 200?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for all of the input guys. 215 it is. I'll be adding some 240v circuits / outlets to the garage in the next couple of months. I'm looking forward to finally learning how to weld.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                      What about the 200?
                      No rebate on the 200 and not really seeing the value it would add.
                      Last edited by Lockean; 11-01-2017, 10:14 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
                        Ditto on that
                        Neither one has much duty cycle on any voltage.
                        They are both cute tho.
                        I would be partial to the 215 and get the tig kit so you could learn that for almost no more money.
                        It is essentially 2 machines in one.
                        Mig-wise they seem pretty close.
                        As a pro I would be looking at the Hobart 210......(not a toy, and cheaper) Just sayin'
                        I'm not seeing an advantage to the Hobart other than a it being $200 less than the Millermatic 211. Unless you're referring to the inverter in the 211.

                        I've read up on the inverter vs transformer debate and concluded: I'm a fan of technology and capability over reliability. My iphone isn't as reliable as an old school flip phone, my brushless Milwaukee Fuel tools haven't been "time tested" like the older versions, and my fuel injected engines don't have near the simplicity and ease of maintenance as carbureted ones. Haha

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by OscarJr View Post

                          For a hobbyist, the duty cycle is "effectively" much higher than rated since no hobbyist will be doing production style work that would actually exercise the full duty cycle continuously, IMO. For random odd jobs where one has to re-position, move abouts, join up several other parts, backstep the weld sequence, etc, I would be willing to bet a $3 bill that the "effective" duty cycle would be closer to 50-70% because all those little breaks add up and give the machine some breathing time. Also, a nice cool ambient temperature of 70-75F will allow even more duty cycle compared to the rated spec of 104F. I am assuming that Miller rates their machines @ 104F, but then again the manual doesn't say so, so I could be totally wrong on that.
                          Yes miller normally rates their machines at a higher temp than competitors.
                          That does give them a bunch more wiggle room.
                          Being a hobbyist doesn't mean light use on machines tho. There are "hobbyist's" here who actually produce more than real "pros" at many given times.
                          All you have to do is tack up an assembly for half a day and then just walk around it and weld for whatever given amount of time to exceed the duty cycle.
                          It is much easier to do with mig than tig.
                          Low duty cycle machines that have repair cost and parts bills that exceed the initial cost of the machine = throw away mentality.
                          I see Miller catering to the "Hobby" market and I am certain it is lucrative.
                          What I would be more of a fan of, (as a professional) would be to produce more machines with duty cycles along the lines of the Dynasty 210. Only a mig. Light (inverter), expanded capabilities and multi-voltage. Then I would be inclined to purchase one. Only problem is it would cost as much as a big machine does. (small obstacle for business)
                          I think eventually it might happen. Time will tell. I understand they can only afford to produce what they can sell to the market.

                          www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                          Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                          MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                          Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                          Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                          Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                          Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                          Miller WC-115-A
                          Miller Spectrum 300
                          Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                          Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by FusionKing View Post

                            Yes miller normally rates their machines at a higher temp than competitors.
                            That does give them a bunch more wiggle room.
                            Being a hobbyist doesn't mean light use on machines tho. There are "hobbyist's" here who actually produce more than real "pros" at many given times.
                            All you have to do is tack up an assembly for half a day and then just walk around it and weld for whatever given amount of time to exceed the duty cycle.
                            It is much easier to do with mig than tig.
                            Low duty cycle machines that have repair cost and parts bills that exceed the initial cost of the machine = throw away mentality.
                            I see Miller catering to the "Hobby" market and I am certain it is lucrative.
                            What I would be more of a fan of, (as a professional) would be to produce more machines with duty cycles along the lines of the Dynasty 210. Only a mig. Light (inverter), expanded capabilities and multi-voltage. Then I would be inclined to purchase one. Only problem is it would cost as much as a big machine does. (small obstacle for business)
                            I think eventually it might happen. Time will tell. I understand they can only afford to produce what they can sell to the market.
                            I see your point, no doubt. I guess we agree to disagree on the definition of a hobbyist. I know I personally don't have half a day to tack up an assembly that takes half-a-day to tack up, since I work 5-6 days a week at my full-time job. That hobbyist must have a lot of free time on their hands, much more than myself, lol.
                            HTP Invertig221 D.V. Water-cooled
                            Eastwood MIG175 w/spoolgun
                            Eastwood Versacut40 Plasma cutter

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I used a small-ish mig to build a trailer years ago. I did exactly what FK was saying, walked around and tacked it up. When I went to weld it out, the duty cycle was killing me. I ended up swapping to an old buzz box and some 6011.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X