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Recommended Equipment for Dynasty 200DX

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  • Recommended Equipment for Dynasty 200DX

    Just bought a used dynasty 200dx.
    Was wondering if you guys could help me out on what equipment I need to buy to get set up and what brands I should aim for . The machines at school are automatically set up for us so I am a bit clueless on what I exactly need .

  • #2
    Since you don't say, I'll assume you'll be doing both TIG and stick. Did you get any accessories with the machine?

    Is this for home business work or just your own projects?

    What is your budget?

    Richard

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Ltbadd View Post
      Since you don't say, I'll assume you'll be doing both TIG and stick. Did you get any accessories with the machine?

      Is this for home business work or just your own projects?

      What is your budget?
      This is just for TIG , The machine didn't come with anything . Just a bare wire that needs a plug. I am fairly new to welding so this is just to practice to get better for now. If possible I would like to stay under 500$ but am willing to go over.

      Comment


      • #4
        Be very willing to go over.

        Gas cylinder.
        Foot pedal.
        Leads.
        Etc.

        Big money.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
          Be very willing to go over.

          Gas cylinder.
          Foot pedal.
          Leads.
          Etc.

          Big money.
          How much can I expect to pay for just a foot pedal / torch / regulator and leads?

          I know the cylinder is going to cost me around 200-400.

          Having a hard time finding out what torch / pedal to buy though.

          Would it also be ok if I use a 120v for the dynasty. I dont think I will need to use more than 120 Amps.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'll let others suggest torch and pedal-I got mine with the contractor's kit at a real deal so all know about is the Miller torch and pedal. There are other vendors with whom I have no direct experience that might be a better deal. I just don't know.

            As to the 120 volts, yes, that will work but you may trip 20 amp breakers--might have to add a 30amp 120 volt circuit ( #10 wire ) but I would try it first-you may be ok. I always run mine on 230 v. I have used it with 3/32 6011 on 120v and it worked fine.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
              ...might have to add a 30amp 120 volt circuit ( #10 wire )...
              If we are acknowledging the possibility of adding a new circuit just for the Dynasty, if it will only be used for the welder, it can be #12 wire, even if protected by a 30A breaker.

              But then, if we were adding new breakers and wire, we would just step up to 240V at the same time. Again, smaller wire than normal is allowed for welders, but you have to make sure it's only for the welder.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by MAC702 View Post

                If we are acknowledging the possibility of adding a new circuit just for the Dynasty, if it will only be used for the welder, it can be #12 wire, even if protected by a 30A breaker.

                But then, if we were adding new breakers and wire, we would just step up to 240V at the same time. Again, smaller wire than normal is allowed for welders, but you have to make sure it's only for the welder.
                I dont really have the option of adding excess circuits as it is my friends house. Unless it is relatively cheap to add a separate circuit for the Dynasty.

                Will I face issues just using a 120V? I know he has a dryer that uses 240V I believe. Should I just buy a plug for 240V then and unplug the dryer when I practice?
                Last edited by Nyellawe; 10-01-2017, 09:09 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
                  I'll let others suggest torch and pedal-I got mine with the contractor's kit at a real deal so all know about is the Miller torch and pedal. There are other vendors with whom I have no direct experience that might be a better deal. I just don't know.

                  As to the 120 volts, yes, that will work but you may trip 20 amp breakers--might have to add a 30amp 120 volt circuit ( #10 wire ) but I would try it first-you may be ok. I always run mine on 230 v. I have used it with 3/32 6011 on 120v and it worked fine.
                  How much did you get your contractors kit for/ where? Also does it really matter the length of the leads/ brand?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MAC702 View Post

                    If we are acknowledging the possibility of adding a new circuit just for the Dynasty, if it will only be used for the welder, it can be #12 wire, even if protected by a 30A breaker.

                    But then, if we were adding new breakers and wire, we would just step up to 240V at the same time. Again, smaller wire than normal is allowed for welders, but you have to make sure it's only for the welder.
                    Right on. Thanks for correcting what was just a wrong statement. Too tired to be writing about this tonight, I guess. Article 630 absolutely allows for #12 for a welder-only outlet at 30 amps. And adding the wire and breaker for 240 v is the most sensible. But, since we have now learned it's some one else's house, the dryer plug is a great way to go so long as it has an equipment grounding conductor (4-wire receptacle) and is not one of the old 3-wire setups. Equipment grounds were added to the NEC for good reasons. Assuming the existing installation was done correctly, It "should work" with the 3-wire plug using the neutral in place of the equipment ground but it is not legit. Interested in your thoughts on that, Mac. I'm a systems engineer who has studied the NEC and done a good deal of electrical work, but you're the electrician--I'll gladly defer to you.

                    You would have to make up an adapter cord unless you put the appropriate plug on the welder. I put a NEMA 6-50 on mine and made adapters for other outlet types.

                    Cannot remember what I paid for the contractor kit-it was about 4 years ago and was bundled with the welder. You can look them up at any Miller dealer on line like Cyberweld or one of their competitors. You could buy a Flowmeter for 35 bucks from HTP, and individually source the work lead, pedal, and torch; just add up and compare costs. Assume you already have a hood and gloves? And get one of Jody's Tig Fingers.

                    The length of the leads is determined by your personal needs-how far do you need to reach? As to brand, there are a lot of people who like CK Worldwide torches, to name one. Other guys will be adding thoughts on torches and pedals, I'm sure.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post

                      Right on. Thanks for correcting what was just a wrong statement. Too tired to be writing about this tonight, I guess. Article 630 absolutely allows for #12 for a welder-only outlet at 30 amps. And adding the wire and breaker for 240 v is the most sensible. But, since we have now learned it's some one else's house, the dryer plug is a great way to go so long as it has an equipment grounding conductor (4-wire receptacle) and is not one of the old 3-wire setups. Equipment grounds were added to the NEC for good reasons. Assuming the existing installation was done correctly, It "should work" with the 3-wire plug using the neutral in place of the equipment ground but it is not legit. Interested in your thoughts on that, Mac. I'm a systems engineer who has studied the NEC and done a good deal of electrical work, but you're the electrician--I'll gladly defer to you.

                      You would have to make up an adapter cord unless you put the appropriate plug on the welder. I put a NEMA 6-50 on mine and made adapters for other outlet types.

                      Cannot remember what I paid for the contractor kit-it was about 4 years ago and was bundled with the welder. You can look them up at any Miller dealer on line like Cyberweld or one of their competitors. You could buy a Flowmeter for 35 bucks from HTP, and individually source the work lead, pedal, and torch; just add up and compare costs. Assume you already have a hood and gloves? And get one of Jody's Tig Fingers.

                      The length of the leads is determined by your personal needs-how far do you need to reach? As to brand, there are a lot of people who like CK Worldwide torches, to name one. Other guys will be adding thoughts on torches and pedals, I'm sure.
                      Is this worth the price?
                      http://www.ebay.com/itm/Miller-Multi...kAAOSwPYZU9IFW

                      And will this even work with dynasty 200?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        No-the dynasty uses a 14-pin pedal; the Multimatic 200 uses a 6-pin, I think. You need to research the torch connections for the Dynasty, then compare the price of the dynasty contractor kit to what you can buy individually. WP-17 torch is the standard air cooled rig that comes from miller but there are other options. Use the Miller contents list from the Dynasty 200 contractor kit and see what you can find. Some people like the SSC pedal better than the miller one. Others prefer other torches. There will probably be a number of answers here over the next couple of days from people with far broader experience with various vendors than I have.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have a foot pedal from htp for my maxstar and I love it. Very precise, made from metal and half the cost of Miller. I use tig torches for ck generally but most torches are fine. And a ground lead is just a ground. Get a heavy ground cable and a quality clamp. Don't get a cheap stamped steel ground but don't fret over it too much.
                          MillerMatic 251
                          Maxstar 150 STH
                          Cutmaster 42
                          Victor Journeyman OA

                          A rockcrawler, er money pit, in progress...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You can get a ground (work) clamp at HF for not a lot of $. Tried posting a pic but it didn't work.

                            And I've never heard of anyone going wrong with products from HTP (USAweld.com). The things I've bought from them have been great.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I got a foot pedal from HTP for my maxstar 150 STH, love it.

                              If you're the Internet shopping kind of guy and need a salesman to tell you what you need, might I suggest as others already have for your odds and ends, that you call HTP, tell them what you have, ask for them to match you up with the right components. There is no "cheap" place to buy quality stuff. You can continue to search for used stuff that might work for your machine, but it sounds like you really aren't sure what to get, so the used market might be a gamble for you.

                              I also don't think you'll be happy with 115v. The drier plug is a better option, but even then, you're only getting 30amps. If your friend has the space and will allow you to do it, it makes sense to install the correct circuit to operate that machine fully. Of everything you need to get, adding that circuit will quite likely be the cheapest.

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