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  • The stick electrode arc voltage

    Hi !

    It was long time since last time I have been in the Forum....


    Now I need a information, regardind the voltage between the stick electode and the work when the ARC PLASMA IS ON.

    I know that the welder machine output is about 50~80 volts whoever I need know the voltage of the arc during the welding

    Thank for any information.

    Regards

    Newton

  • #2
    Arc voltage and current will vary somewhat with arc length. A quality welder will show a voltage curve graph in the manual.

    As an example, both the Miller Dialarc 250 and the Lincoln Idealarc 250 are rated at 250 Amps, 30 Volts (AC). My little Thermal Arc 161STL inverter is rated at 160 Amps at 26.4 Volts.
    Miller stuff:
    Dialarc 250 (1974)
    Syncrowave 250 (1992)
    Spot welder (Dayton badged)

    Comment


    • #3
      I would say most arc voltages for SMAW are around 17 - 19 VOLTS? Thought maybe I read that somewhere. The book maybe referring to OCV.

      Comment


      • #4
        Alotta variables in constant current, arc length, size of rod, rod composition, manufacturer of said rod. size of arc cable, type of machine. Voltage input if its a static plug in machine. If its an engine drive, whole lotta other variables

        So get a meter out and have someone read it....

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by cruizer View Post
          Alotta variables in constant current, arc length, size of rod, rod composition, manufacturer of said rod. size of arc cable, type of machine. Voltage input if its a static plug in machine. If its an engine drive, whole lotta other variables

          So get a meter out and have someone read it....
          Cruizer, where does the maximum OCV come to play? My Model 88 is rated at 30 volts, with maximum of 80.

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          • #6
            Just generally better for starting characteristics to have a higher OCV, In mines most machines have a voltge reduction switch sooooo, ocv is like 15. So you don't get that big spark right off the bat. Really for the general guy OCV means zip, just something we techs look at for the validity of the machine. So if a machine says its sopposed to be 80, and it reads 60, there is something wrong. That OCV pretty much means nothing to the operator.

            Why are you asking?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by cruizer View Post
              Just generally better for starting characteristics to have a higher OCV, In mines most machines have a voltge reduction switch sooooo, ocv is like 15. So you don't get that big spark right off the bat. Really for the general guy OCV means zip, just something we techs look at for the validity of the machine. So if a machine says its sopposed to be 80, and it reads 60, there is something wrong. That OCV pretty much means nothing to the operator.

              Why are you asking?
              Idle curiosity.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi USMCPOP,

                Thanks for the advise.

                I have downloaded the Miller cathalogh but the complete stick arc voltage parameters I could not read.
                The tables show 30V @ 250A and 28V @ 250A however no data for lower currents.

                Maybe some manual or book have published a graph the arc voltage (arc voltage X arc current ) ??

                Thanks

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by johnnyg340 View Post
                  I would say most arc voltages for SMAW are around 17 - 19 VOLTS? Thought maybe I read that somewhere. The book maybe referring to OCV.
                  Hi johnnyg340 !

                  Your answer is close to the information that I am looking for.

                  Do you have the table of or graphic of arc voltage X arc current ?

                  I am not looking for the OCV or the V x A machine characteristics.

                  Wath book may show such information ?

                  regards

                  newton
                  Last edited by Newton Brawn; 08-22-2014, 10:54 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Most owners manuals show the graph, however the voltage WILL NOT BE CONSTANT, The current (amps will be)Voltage will always vary unless your a robot or a load bank, or weld with exactly the same stickout. Unsure why you would need this information...

                    Maybe look up NEMA spects, like 200 amps at 26 volts, 32 @ 300, 450 @ 36, Miller/Lincoln plus spec 29 @ 300. Says in the first couple pages what the specs are for that machine

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My son prides himself with TIG welding as he seems to be able to maintain a consistent distance so that the voltage varies very little. When he was in welding class and helping out, he would watch the meters on the Miller welders when others were welding. He could tell when they were OK or about to dip the tungsten.
                      Miller stuff:
                      Dialarc 250 (1974)
                      Syncrowave 250 (1992)
                      Spot welder (Dayton badged)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi Cruizer and all people that have helped me ...

                        Thanks, for informations and interest imn my question

                        Im making a circuit simulation with a transformer and inductance as is in a buzz box. The magnitude of arc voltage will be the major parameter in such simulation. The simulation will show the inductance reaction and currents/voltage waveforms at a simple buzzbox and stick electrode. Them we can "see" inside the welder.

                        Regards

                        Newton

                        Regards

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The best way to find out actual voltages, simply connect a multimeter between ground and stinger (install alligator clips if necessary) and have somebody read and record the values while you weld.
                          Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Much simpler with a reactor coil, (like a load bank) and a scope simular to a
                            ATTEN model #ADS1102C Color scope. Now the ATTEN is the Hong Kong brand, however, here it becomes a really high priced name brand. Ordering it direct from Hong Kong reduces the price by a major factor. Talking hundreds of dollars cheaper for the exact same unit. If you try to scope a machine by welding with it, your scope lines will be all over the place, and next to impossible to read. Thus is the reason I use a load bank. Scope lines are easily adjustable and easy to read. Simple to find a problem

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The fact is, if you are doing something scientific, you should be starting with hard facts, get a multimeter, and several different power sources, and start testing and recording the numbers yourself. If you are depending on "opinions", from unknown sources on a free message board, is anything or any conclusions you come up with afterwards really valid????

                              I mean, how would I know, just welding, exactly what volts my Hobart 325 is running at? And with the same rod, would I have any idea if either of my Commander 500s are running at the same volts? Likewise my 301 Miller, or my Lincoln 250?

                              I can set each to run perfectly, but however I doubt very much if the voltages on each are exactly the same, or even near the same.

                              Do a test, sample everything. Or restrict your conclusions, based on a certain brand or model of welder.
                              Last edited by JSFAB; 08-23-2014, 06:24 PM.
                              Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

                              Comment

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