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  • Desparately needing help

    I am a homeschooling Mom of a 15 year old boy who wishes to become a welder. I am in search of some suggestions to incorporate into his curriculum for credit towards his Career Technical requirements for graduation. We travel pretty extensively with my husband's work, so cannot rely on a local class. I have a few ideas but I'm struggling to find resources. I have looked into Metallurgy, but found the material is probably a bit more advanced than what he is ready for. (OK, so most material I found was geared towards the Master Level). I was considering Welding Safety, Various styles of welding (what they are, what they entail etc), different techniques and their application, perhaps finding something to help him read prints, welding symbols and the like. I would greatly appreciate any pointers or resources that you might be aware of. I have very little knowledge of welding myself, so am in dire need of some assistance. I want to thank everyone in advance for your time. Willow

  • #2
    Originally posted by WickedWillow View Post
    I am a homeschooling Mom of a 15 year old boy who wishes to become a welder. I am in search of some suggestions to incorporate into his curriculum for credit towards his Career Technical requirements for graduation. We travel pretty extensively with my husband's work, so cannot rely on a local class. I have a few ideas but I'm struggling to find resources. I have looked into Metallurgy, but found the material is probably a bit more advanced than what he is ready for. (OK, so most material I found was geared towards the Master Level). I was considering Welding Safety, Various styles of welding (what they are, what they entail etc), different techniques and their application, perhaps finding something to help him read prints, welding symbols and the like. I would greatly appreciate any pointers or resources that you might be aware of. I have very little knowledge of welding myself, so am in dire need of some assistance. I want to thank everyone in advance for your time. Willow
    The Boy Scouts now have a welding merit badge... contacting your local troop could give you more resources in your area...
    .

    *******************************************
    The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

    “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

    Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

    My Blue Stuff:
    Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
    Dynasty 200DX
    Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
    Millermatic 200

    TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

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    • #3
      That is an excellent suggestion! I will see if I can locate a local troop for some more information. Thanks!

      Comment


      • #4
        The resources section here has a lot of free and purchasable educational material..

        http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...g-your-skills/
        .

        *******************************************
        The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

        “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

        Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

        My Blue Stuff:
        Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
        Dynasty 200DX
        Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
        Millermatic 200

        TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

        Comment


        • #5
          The AWS should be helpful as well..

          http://www.aws.org/education/
          .

          *******************************************
          The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

          “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

          Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

          My Blue Stuff:
          Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
          Dynasty 200DX
          Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
          Millermatic 200

          TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

          Comment


          • #6
            You can try www.weldingtipsandtricks.com also Practical Welding T. V. You might have to try television instead of T.V. Lots of luck

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you so very much for the wonderful suggestions! I am currently digging through these to see if I can pull something suitable together. I can't tell you how much I appreciate the information. I really had no idea where to begin. Great jumping off point, thanks! Willow

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              • #8
                I believe the best way would be to just get a used welder and let him go to town on some scrap metal. He can read every book written about welding but until he actually puts hands on it and does it, its just fantasy land. Knowing in your head how to do it from reading books isn't the same as hands on experience. I thought I was the best welder in town after reading several "how to books" and online forums, then I got my first welder and found out I was sorely wrong.

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                • #9
                  Where are you & how long do you typically stay in one area?
                  A local participant of this board might volunteer to spend a day or two to help you get started, etc.

                  Frank

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by WickedWrenches View Post
                    I believe the best way would be to just get a used welder and let him go to town on some scrap metal. He can read every book written about welding but until he actually puts hands on it and does it, its just fantasy land. Knowing in your head how to do it from reading books isn't the same as hands on experience. I thought I was the best welder in town after reading several "how to books" and online forums, then I got my first welder and found out I was sorely wrong.
                    Of course hands on is important..

                    But so is a sound technical knowledge of the welding process that you are learning.. with all of the free technical manuals that are available for download...

                    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...pamphlets.html

                    I wish some of this had been available when I started to learn.... It would have saved me from teaching myself a BUNCH of bad habits that I later needed to unlearn...

                    Rather than marching onward into the fog solo... it would be better for most beginners to have a mentor or teacher available... not to mention proper equipment and setup for the process selected...

                    as mentioned before... there are a lot of excellent YouTube videos available as well...
                    .

                    *******************************************
                    The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                    “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                    Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                    My Blue Stuff:
                    Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                    Dynasty 200DX
                    Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                    Millermatic 200

                    TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Watching the online videos should really get him interested in learning to weld. I started watching recently and decided I "needed" new equipment and wanted to really improve my hobby skills. I watch many of the videos over and over trying to learn, just like taking a class. These forums with the abundance of projects questions and helpful advise are a real asset.

                      I understand the "home schooled" and relocation, however is there a chance there is a local community college where he could take just a welding class?? Even if he doesn't complete the class he might get some good instruction. I know it all depends how long you stay in one place... or if you could stay behind a few weeks on the next move, if needed, to complete classes... If you know where and when the next move is, look ahead, get him setup for a class... Some of this might be a lot harder on your son than it is for you, accommodations can be made.

                      I took my only welding class at the local College in the summer between my Junior and Senior year of High School...
                      Glen
                      Miller Dynasty 200DX - Millermatic 350P - Hypertherm Powermax 45
                      For Sale! - Hobart Handler 150 - Miller EconoTwin HF

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Math, math, and more math. I went to a 2 year degree program in Anchorage and they do NDT (non destructive testing, x ray,,,etc) Anyway I noticed the kids were lacking in their math skills. I went as a 44 year old veteran on the GI bill and that was my perspective. The kids can weld but they dont know how to study or want to take shortcuts in their calculations. He needs to know math. Algebra, trig, and how to use a calculator. My opinion. He can do it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I appreciate everyone's responses! We are currently in North Eastern Colorado. At this time, we are not sure how long we will be in the area. There is rumor that leads us to believe we may be here for a few more months at least. We are going to be checking with the Agriculture/Shop teacher next week when the local schools resume. The community college is over an hour away from us and they would not take him (for insurance purposes, they said) at 15. We are looking for a fine balance between book smart and experience smart. As per our residential state's regulations, we must have both. We are looking into acquiring a used welding machine and some material for him to practice with. He is very interested in learning this skill and while he is so enthusiastic, we'd like to encourage and support him as much as we are able to. Finding equipment and materials for him to practice with is the easier of the two for us, whereas, locating relevant material for him to familiarize himself is a task for me (with absolutely zero knowledge in the area). We are continuing our search and hope to find some assistance within the local school's shop teacher. Again, thank you all for such wonderful advice. :-)

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 11b View Post
                            Math, math, and more math. I went to a 2 year degree program in Anchorage and they do NDT (non destructive testing, x ray,,,etc) Anyway I noticed the kids were lacking in their math skills. I went as a 44 year old veteran on the GI bill and that was my perspective. The kids can weld but they dont know how to study or want to take shortcuts in their calculations. He needs to know math. Algebra, trig, and how to use a calculator. My opinion. He can do it.
                            We are definitely working on the Math. We realized that this would be a valuable skill (after speaking with many welders in our previous location). It will help keep him motivated in the area of Math, knowing that it will assist him in his chosen career path. It is a win/win situation for everyone.

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                            • #15
                              Sounds good! In looking for a machine to learn with I would seriously consider one of the multi-process units so he can learn TIG, MIG & Stick... Also consider the multi-voltage units so you can plug it in most anywhere.

                              I would think something like the Miller Multimatic 200 TIG kit (#951586) would be perfect. It costs more, but is is US made, reliable, rugged, light, very portable and has everything he needs to practice with.... it's for his education, not a home hobby. http://www.millerwelds.com/products/...p?model=M00361
                              Glen
                              Miller Dynasty 200DX - Millermatic 350P - Hypertherm Powermax 45
                              For Sale! - Hobart Handler 150 - Miller EconoTwin HF

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