Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Smooth welds??

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    smooth weld......then submerged arc......

    Originally posted by gnforge View Post
    Research the notch affect & study as it relates to and affects the Strength of steel.
    Personally I like a smoother weld. The only time I use stack of dime weld is on Alm. Where I want that look for appearance not strength.
    Just my opinion
    I have seen muliple submerged arc welds on 2 inch thick booms carriages that are nearly smooth, seeing how these are xrayed, and use on crane carriages, it must be of sufficent strength, also i would be more worried about pentration, and undercutting, as this seems to be the main failure point.
    Lincoln ranger 305g x2
    Ln25
    Miller spectrum 625
    Miller 30a spoolgun
    Wc115a
    Lincoln 210mp
    F550 imt service truck

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Tryagn5:322378
      Originally posted by gnforge View Post
      Research the notch affect & study as it relates to and affects the Strength of steel.
      Personally I like a smoother weld. The only time I use stack of dime weld is on Alm. Where I want that look for appearance not strength.
      Just my opinion
      I have seen muliple submerged arc welds on 2 inch thick booms carriages that are nearly smooth, seeing how these are xrayed, and use on crane carriages, it must be of sufficent strength, also i would be more worried about pentration, and undercutting, as this seems to be the main failure point.
      Different process all together. If your tig welding and your welds are smoothe theres nothing wrong with that, there are tecniques that will give you those results. If youre tiggin and your welds are dark grey something is wrong in the equation. Speed, heat etc. Lots of variables.

      Comment


      • #18
        Smooth is not bad. Core shield 8 runs really smooth, and is used for structural applications. I would say from looking at the pics said welder just needs more practice to "see" what he is looking at. I pulse the peddle sometimes and sometimes not. Filler metal thickness of course has influence on your puddle also. As the late Vince said "perfect practice makes perfect"

        Comment


        • #19
          sub merged arc no tig....really?

          Originally posted by Gingerboy View Post
          Different process all together. If your tig welding and your welds are smoothe theres nothing wrong with that, there are tecniques that will give you those results. If youre tiggin and your welds are dark grey something is wrong in the equation. Speed, heat etc. Lots of variables.
          no kiddin submerged arc is different than tig!? Thats not my point, my point was the appearance of the weld vs strength.
          Lincoln ranger 305g x2
          Ln25
          Miller spectrum 625
          Miller 30a spoolgun
          Wc115a
          Lincoln 210mp
          F550 imt service truck

          Comment


          • #20
            MMW and Trygn5 are right, There is nothing wrong with smooth, Rippled welds are caused by peddle manipulation and dipping the filler rod.

            Smooth welds are caused by smooth even power, a steady hand and a steady feed of wire.

            The nice thing about a smooth welds are that it makes it easier to detect if you have any under cut at the edge of the weld.

            The nice thing about pulsing which will give you a rippled weld is that you get a little less heat input into the part, in some instances this is good and other times you want good heat input on say thick heavy weldments for good penetration.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Portable Welder:322385
              MMW and Trygn5 are right, There is nothing wrong with smooth, Rippled welds are caused by peddle manipulation and dipping the filler rod.

              Smooth welds are caused by smooth even power, a steady hand and a steady feed of wire.

              The nice thing about a smooth welds are that it makes it easier to detect if you have any under cut at the edge of the weld.

              The nice thing about pulsing which will give you a rippled weld is that you get a little less heat input into the part, in some instances this is good and other times you want good heat input on say thick heavy weldments for good penetration.
              10/4 on that brother. Theres a time and place for every method. I run smoothe alot as well. Depends on what ya need.
              Attached Files

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by WickedWrenches View Post
                Have a Diversion 180. Using 1/16th 2% ceriated with argon set to 15cfh, 3/32 Er70s-2 filler rod at 75 amps. Doing practice lines on clean 16 gauge mild steel coupons . Im keeping a slow steady constant speed across the steel while welding and the welds are coming out smooth, no ripples in some sections. Even if i use stop and go or move forward then back a little in small increments it still stays smooth, Im holding the torch at 70 degrees as recommended and pushing the puddle, not dragging it...cant seem to get steady ripples, am I doing something wrong here?

                Name:  d4d9ec3c5c965000395207094237cad4.jpg
Views: 2
Size:  33.9 KB
                Hey! A little late! Haven't been here for a while. Your weld looks like you are running too cold. The amps you are running are good. The problem is your filler is thicker than your base material. When you add rod, you are sucking the heat out of the puddle. Then your filler just piles up on top. Hope this helps.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by kelsart72 View Post
                  I'm no expert but your pic looks like you're moving too fast and not getting enough of the filler wire in the weld, i use a tapping motion when i TIG weld, tapping the wire into the heat while steadily moving forward and not just pushing the wire into it, I hope that makes sense and helps.

                  Makes sense to me. Lately my practice has been doing this with the tip of the filler just tapping into the puddle right before the tungsten hits it.

                  Everything stays close but it melts the rod back just in time to raise out and tap again. I also believe in sliding the torch hand and not bending at the wrist. Get longer straighter welds.

                  Hold that filler in a perfect line with where your going, helps keep straight.

                  I've also started keeping focus on the filler tip and tungsten tip after the puddle and heat is established , the puddle just comes along in the background as you focus is where your moving too and the tip of the filler.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Sorry mention to say not always a bad thing sorry for the confusion
                    Syncrowave 250
                    Millermatic 210
                    dialarc 250
                    spectrum 375x
                    trailblazer 302
                    Lincoln 135

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X