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  • #16
    If you have anything in your shop you don't want rusty, I'd stay away from either natural gas or propane - they generate about as much WATER as they do heat, it's a natural byproduct of combustion. So unless you can locate the exhaust outside and use an air-to-air heat exchanger, they will raise the humidity a LOT.

    I too have a 240 volt heater for my shop, and a small 120 volt one that stays set at about 50 degrees and lives under my wood-working tools - that keeps the tool surfaces above dewpoint and doesn't cost too much. The 240 volter only gets turned on when I'm in the shop, takes half hour to an hour to bring it up to tolerable depending on the outside weather. Shop is currently NOT insulated, wood siding/roof with 3-tab comp shingles, 36 x 48.

    This is the one I have, works as good as any.

    http://www.air-n-water.com/product/brh562.html

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    • #17
      Humidity and rust

      Originally posted by BukitCase View Post
      If you have anything in your shop you don't want rusty, I'd stay away from either natural gas or propane - they generate about as much WATER as they do heat, it's a natural byproduct of combustion. So unless you can locate the exhaust outside and use an air-to-air heat exchanger, they will raise the humidity a LOT.
      Good point on water as a byproduct of combustion. As far as I know, kerosene would also have water as a by-product, just like gasoline does. Most people live in higher humidity climates, so more moisture means more rust and other problems. Humidity is probably not a huge issue for people living in very dry climates.

      Another reason to use a vented heater, or just go electric.

      Richard
      Syncrowave 200, Millermatic 211, Victor torch, Propane forge....

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      • #18
        Some things to mull over...

        http://www.farmandfleet.com/ask-the-...ge-heater.aspx
        MillerMatic 211 Auto-set w/MVP
        Just For Home Projects.

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        • #19
          Doughboy, sounds to me like that link's Rick may be an "internet expert" - not one mention of the water from fossil fuels, rust, etc - or maybe he lives in Arid-zona ... Steve

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          • #20
            I just installed some 3000w infrared heaters. They look like fluorescent lights, but use a tungsten element in a quartz tube.

            Infratech had a SEMA show special. 2 x 3000w fixtures plus 2x output contollers for $600

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            • #21
              I keep the shop warm with a propane HotDawg heater. On weekends I run the wood pellet stove to conserve propane and bring the temp up a little more for when I am working.
              If I ever have the ability to build a new shop it will have hot water radiant in the slab. A guy I used to work with has it and heats the water with a 30 gallon domestic style water heater.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by big mike View Post
                I keep the shop warm with a propane HotDawg heater. On weekends I run the wood pellet stove to conserve propane and bring the temp up a little more for when I am working.
                If I ever have the ability to build a new shop it will have hot water radiant in the slab. A guy I used to work with has it and heats the water with a 30 gallon domestic style water heater.
                Big Mike,

                If you ever do get to build your own shop (and I'm root'n for ya there brother) and put hot water radiant in the slab I'd advise you make a good map with dimensions (for future reference) of where the tubing is run. That way if you ever get the need to anchor bolt something to the slab you'll a reasonable idea of where you'll be able to get a way with doing it.

                I ran up against this situation once before and had it be problematic.
                Will Argue for Beer (any issue, either side)

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                • #23
                  Ha, oh boy do I know your pain. I love hydronic heating as much as the next guy, but dang I had a bear of a time on the last house I finished. Remodel, had to cut a 18x7 pad out for a new structural fireplace, in floor heat. Took me a few full days "excavating" around the cut tubes to reroute and reconnect.

                  Making a map would be sweet but a little unreliable as things move quite a bit in a pour. Now days I borrow my friends thermal imager. You can see an entire grid, works amazingly well. Then you can drill and set anchors with confidence.
                  Last edited by Cgotto6; 02-19-2014, 08:50 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by big mike View Post
                    I keep the shop warm with a propane HotDawg heater. On weekends I run the wood pellet stove to conserve propane and bring the temp up a little more for when I am working.
                    If I ever have the ability to build a new shop it will have hot water radiant in the slab. A guy I used to work with has it and heats the water with a 30 gallon domestic style water heater.

                    I run a pellet stove/electric,and propane. Generally stick mostly with a older Austroflamm for almost all my heating needs. There are pellet stoves, and there are Austroflamm. built is 92-93 and never one issue with it..

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
                      Ha, oh boy do I know your pain. I love hydronic heating as much as the next guy, but dang I had a bear of a time on the last house I finished. Remodel, had to cut a 18x7 pad out for a new structural fireplace, in floor heat. Took me a few full days "excavating" around the cut tubes to reroute and reconnect.

                      Making a map would be sweet but a little unreliable as things move quite a bit in a pour. Now days I borrow my friends thermal imager. You can see an entire grid, works amazingly well. Then you can drill and set anchors with confidence.
                      Cgotto6,

                      Thermal imager??? Well sure, if you just want to do everything the easy way.

                      But seriously, that hadn't even occurred to me that it was a possibility.

                      Thanks for bringing that to my attention.
                      Will Argue for Beer (any issue, either side)

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                      • #26
                        Yup, can be had on amazon for relatively cheap considering how versatile they can be. You can use them to locate studs in walls and help locate poorly insulated areas in buildings. My friend has used to to quickly locate exhaust leaks too. They're pretty cool.

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