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  • High moisture in shop??

    Hello, this is not a welding question, but figured others might have the same problems. I don't heat my shop all the time and have a big problem with moisture on everything from tools to you name it. I had heard one time saying if you run a fan it would help. Anyone have any ideas? Thanks in advance.
    Welder99
    Ps. Merry Christmas
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  • #2
    Today i would have had the same problem. My shop is cold from the cooler winter air and today the temps went into the 60's. As soon as i would have opened my big door all of that warm air would have made everything inside soaking wet. So today i left the big door down and worked in my basement shop...Bob
    Bob Wright

    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

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    • #3
      ↑↑↑↑ spoiled
      .
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      • #4
        welcom to the forum, i cant help to notice the abundance of equipment that you have, quite an investment, to be without a heat source is not doing your tools any good, speak to the women in your life, grab their old sheets and pillow cases, they make good covers in situations like this

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        • #5
          I would save up and insulate the shop, then it would be more cost effective to be able to heat the shop during all the cold months.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Welder99 View Post
            Hello, this is not a welding question, but figured others might have the same problems. I don't heat my shop all the time and have a big problem with moisture on everything from tools to you name it. I had heard one time saying if you run a fan it would help. Anyone have any ideas? Thanks in advance.
            Welder99
            Ps. Merry Christmas
            I live in the South and it is humid as the day is long. A dehumidifier will fix your issues.
            Nick

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            • #7
              Not sure that a dehumidifier will work if the shop is below freezing.....

              You might be able to heat your shop just a little to lower the humidity. Any heating will lower the humidity. I was looking at a psychometric chart, and even a 10 degrees increase in temperature will lower the relative humidity dramatically. For example, if you had 100% relative humidity outside at 40F, and heated your shop to 50F, the relative humidity would drop to 60%. This assumes that your shop is not airtight, so the outside air will come in at a certain rate. If the temperature in your shop is higher than the outside air temperature, then the percent humidity in your shop will be reduced, relative to the outside. If you wanted to be super-scientific about it, rather than using a standard thermostat, use a differential thermostat, such that your shop would be kept at 10F higher than the outside. A different and simpler approach would be to put an electric heater on a timer, maybe run 5 or 10 minutes per hour, that would keep the shop warmer than the outside.

              Some folks suggest that 50% humidity is a good goal to minimize rusting.

              You might want to invest in humidity meter for inside and outside.

              Disclaimer: This is an engineering view of the problem, looking at the physics of humidity. I live in a dry climate, so my tools tend to stay very free of rust, with no effort on my part. However, a recent flood caused me to buy a dehumidifier and some humidity meters, so I have been paying a lot of attention to humidity lately.

              Richard
              Last edited by raferguson; 12-23-2013, 05:58 PM.
              Syncrowave 200, Millermatic 211, Victor torch, Propane forge....

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              • #8
                Thanks to all that's replied

                I do have some insulation, it's an old shop. I'm thinking about a wood pellet stove if I can find a good used one, that way I can at least get some heat and try to keep the high cost of heating down. Here in Ohio you never know what kind of weather your going to get.Ive been welding for 34 yrs this yr. I weld full time for my employer and part time here at home. Summer time I've got all the work
                I need but once the snow flies things get slow on the side, so I'm not in my shop every day. Happy Holidays
                Trailblazer 250G
                Bobcat 225
                Miller 150 STL
                Lincoln SA-200
                Miller XMT 304
                Lincoln Squarewave 355
                Lincoln 140C
                Lincoln 170T
                Miller S-22A feeder
                Miller 30A Spoolgun
                Miller XR-15
                Lincoln LN-25's
                Hypetherm 380
                Trailblazer 302
                Spectrum 875
                Just to mention a few

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                • #9
                  I was going to suggest a pellet stove. Those things are relatively cheap and they dry a place out real good.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kevin View Post
                    welcom to the forum, i cant help to notice the abundance of equipment that you have, quite an investment, to be without a heat source is not doing your tools any good,

                    Ditto..
                    I a retired electrical engineer who has worked on the design of a product exposed to dew point condensation.. The failure mechanisms it brings on is not something you want to expose expensive equipment to if you can avoid it..

                    In an industrial environment, the circuit boards and other electrical components inside the product, over time get coated with some rather nasty dust contaminants. In lab simulation of this effect involves exposing the product to quite small e.g. parts per million levels of sulfur dioxide and chlorine compounds in a high humidity environment.

                    When dew point condensation occurs, these contaminants can turn acidic, and get washed down into any connectors or other unsealed components and wreak their havoc.

                    Well designed products will use conformal coated http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conformal_coating circuit boards and other sealing measures to keep this stuff out of electrical connections, and high quality switches and other sealed components. Keeping the equipment out of a condensing environment if possbile is certainly not a bad idea.
                    Last edited by dandeman; 12-24-2013, 09:31 PM.
                    Hobby Welder for about 32 years
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                    • #11
                      well said, never gave it much thought of the dust/moisture mixture being much more than dust and water

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                      • #12
                        Any vented heat will help.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by raferguson View Post
                          Not sure that a dehumidifier will work if the shop is below freezing.....

                          Richard
                          Richard,
                          They do manufacture dehumidifiers that function at low temperatures. All that would be required would be minimal heat to keep the unit from freezing. I have seen many units that work in 38 degree environments. There may be some that function at lower temperatures.
                          Nick

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                          • #14
                            Dehumidifiers

                            I live in Louisiana & these up and down temps are killing me with condensation.

                            My shop is well insulated 20 X 30 metal building with metal on the interior as well.. I did find out that if you keep the air moving continuously (ie... 2 small box fans) you can stop the condensation on the walls & equipment. If I don't run the fans, it will look like a rain forrest with water on everything and dripping from above. The sealed concrete floor is not that easy. I'll go in in the morning after a roller coaster temp change and my floors looked like they have been mopped. little puddles and all. The walls and equipment will be bone dry. I'm sure it is because the floor stays cool and condenses that moisture laden air.

                            My question, has anybody had any luck using a dehumidifier in a metal building with roll up doors? I'm thinking that the intrusion allowed by the poor seal of the doors & the rather large opening near the top of the roll ups will defeat the dehumidifier.

                            Steve in Louisiana . .
                            Millermatic 251
                            Lincoln AC/DC "Tombstone"
                            Milwaulkee Grinder 4 1/2"
                            Clark Grinder 4 1/2"

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