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SHop rates

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  • SHop rates

    I am trying to get an idea what weld/fab rates are going for in the central U.S. Can anyone give me some general feedback?

  • #2
    very localized, if you are in a busy, upbeat area, call around, if you are very rural, any thing does, running a shop is not what it used to be, people are very comfortable throwing things away, there goes the repair work, now this is very broad, you need to talk to people with experience in YOUR area.

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    • #3
      AWF01 welcome to the forum.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by kevin View Post
        very localized, if you are in a busy, upbeat area, call around, if you are very rural, any thing does, running a shop is not what it used to be, people are very comfortable throwing things away, there goes the repair work, now this is very broad, you need to talk to people with experience in YOUR area.
        Where I live there's many seasonal homes due to the large lake. A friend works at a dump where these homes are located. People throw away perfectly good stuff when they leave in the fall. Because of the high shop rates, in some cases it's cheaper to buy new than fix.

        I believe it's not about what you think you're worth, it's about what the local market will be willing to accept.

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        • #5
          I agree with Kevin, this is a very broad question. Are you asking because you are planning to go into business or trying to determine the cost of having something done? In addition to what he said it will depend on what type of welding/fabrication you are talking about. What material,what process, how many pieces and how well equipped the shop is. Your target clientele will also dictate what you can charge or be charged. If you're going into business, unless you are independently wealthy and feeling benevolent, your overhead/investment costs will have to be accounted for in what you charge. If you plan to compete only locally then as Kevin said call around and see what people are charging but make sure you are comparing apples with apples. Basically it is whatever the market will bear so you first need to identify the market in question and who your competition will be. Have you searched the threads on this forum and on Weldingweb cause I'm sure you are not the first to pose this or a similar question? Best of luck.---Meltedmetal

          P.S. There is what you should charge(be paid) and what you can charge, you can only hope that the the second is larger than the first.-Mm
          Last edited by Meltedmetal; 12-21-2013, 09:00 AM.

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          • #6
            What industry you cater to has a big part of what you can expect to be paid.

            Doing home owner repairs is a great way to lose your shirt, but doing jobsite commercial repairs can be quite lucrative as downtime is more expensive than the repair bill from a competent service provider.

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