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syncrowave 200 KW usage ?

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  • syncrowave 200 KW usage ?

    guys,
    anyone know what my syncrowave 200 air cooled units KW/hr usage is ?
    i looked here in the product description and couldnt find it.
    trying to quote a job and figuring out all the costs of electricity, rod, gas, etc..
    thanks for any help

  • #2
    Originally posted by FABMAN View Post
    guys,
    anyone know what my syncrowave 200 air cooled units KW/hr usage is ?
    i looked here in the product description and couldnt find it.
    trying to quote a job and figuring out all the costs of electricity, rod, gas, etc..
    thanks for any help
    Hmm, it struck me that KW/HR usage would depend upon the amperage setting of the machine. There could be a variation from 5 to 200 amps on a SW200. Perhaps someone knows if there is a constant for Syncrowave 200 kw/hr usage.

    Likewise gas usage would depend upon setting of the flowmeter....15scfh, 20scfh, 25, scfh would all vary usage.

    Rod is also a variable that depends upon what you are welding and for how long.

    I would like to see the answers on this. This is interesting.

    Comment


    • #3
      You can break it down but I wouldn't worry about electricity consumption in the bid.

      The gas you can figger out easily enough as well as the rod.

      "Cost of Power - Cost of electrical power is a very small part of the cost of deposit-ing weld metal and in most cases is less than 1% of the total"

      http://edgewh.esabna.com/EUWeb/AWTC/Lesson9_3.htm

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Synchroman View Post
        Hmm, it struck me that KW/HR usage would depend upon the amperage setting of the machine. There could be a variation from 5 to 200 amps on a SW200. Perhaps someone knows if there is a constant for Syncrowave 200 kw/hr usage.

        Likewise gas usage would depend upon setting of the flowmeter....15scfh, 20scfh, 25, scfh would all vary usage.

        Rod is also a variable that depends upon what you are welding and for how long.

        I would like to see the answers on this. This is interesting.
        thanks... i can figure the gas and filler, but someone told me the syncrowaves draw electricity even at idle, and lets say im running at 100amps for the other equation.... any help would be appreciated

        Comment


        • #5
          There is a chart on page 12 of the newest version(didn't check older ones) of the owners manual that will put you in the ball park. Idle looks to be .3 kw. at 150 amps out it varies between 4.3 and 6 kw depending on the voltage out. If you are figuring that close pick 6 kw.---Meltedmetal

          Comment


          • #6
            Your electrical use is a very small part of the costs, I wouldn't even bother trying to figger it out.

            Cost you more in labor/time trying to calculate it.

            But

            V X A = watts

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
              Your electrical use is a very small part of the costs, I wouldn't even bother trying to figger it out.

              Cost you more in labor/time trying to calculate it.

              But

              V X A = watts
              Yes, I certainly agree that it's a negligible portion of costs. Also to clarify, when I said 5 to 200 amps above, I meant the output that is generated by the unit itself. The input would be a much smaller amount of current since it would be on a 240 VAC line, assuming that you have a 240V machine.

              It you truly wanted to calculate the KW/Hr in certain modes, you would have to do a test with some sort of breakout of the two main power cables. Then you could use a clamp meter on one or the other of the wires and calculate a rough usage. This needs to be done carefully, however and as Mr. Brocolli says, it's really not worth the time.

              As to the amount of current at idle, it's got to be very low, even on a transformer unit like the SW200. I operate my water cooler from the convenience outlet on the face of the SW200 and that's really only about an amp. I would guess another amp or two for the machine at idle, but the only way to tell is with a clamp meter which must be placed on a single wire to give a correct reading.

              I would suggest that your most expensive segment would be the shielding gas. I know, for example that I can weld for close to 11 hours with a 160 cu. ft. customer-owned argon cylinder at 15 scfh. Estimate how much time you will spend on the work and you would have a very accurate value.

              As mentioned, the electricity and welding rod are really not a very large part of the equation like the gas would be.

              By the way, I love my Syncrowave 200. As a long time hobby welder, it was a treat when I got mine. It was a near new trade-in at an LWS and had only six hours on it. That was five years ago and it has served me well.

              Right now, I'm developing a love affair with my new MM252. You should see what it does to 1/2" plate at 29.5 Volts and 515 IPM!


              Happy Trails!
              Last edited by Synchroman; 10-15-2013, 05:23 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                You can get a ball park by looking at the Chart in the Manual for the rated power use

                150 welding amps at 16volts = yada yada yada

                Comment


                • #9
                  The Sync 200 manual has some input/output specs. For example:

                  Stick welding 150 Amps DC at 26 Volts, you'd be drawing 5.8 kW at 230 VAC input. So figure your cost per kWhr and your weld on time.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    For some reason my attempted post requires moderator approval. Let's try again.

                    Appx 6 kW in at 150 DC stick out, but you have a 40% duty cycle at that point. If you are paying 12 cents per kilowatt-hour:

                    6 x .12 x .4 = $.288 per hour.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Why would anyone bother trying to figure this out?

                      I mean, it makes about as much sense as trying to figure out what percentage of the price of a cup of coffee accounts for the sugar ... when you only use "Sweet 'n' Low."

                      Beyond concluding, "Gee, the figure is probably negligible," who cares?

                      Originally posted by Synchroman View Post
                      Right now, I'm developing a love affair with my new MM252. You should see what it does to 1/2" plate at 29.5 Volts and 515 IPS!
                      Your machine spits out 42 feet of wire per second? Almost half a mile per minute? The recoil alone sounds dangerous!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Guess I've offended the internet gods. I posted about this in the morning but even though my computer indicates that I posted(little green check mark) my post never showed up. Anyway there is a chart in the owners manual that says the idle draw is .3 kw and the welding draw varies from 4.3 to 6 kw at 150 amps out depending on the volts out. If you still want to run the numbers extrapolate from there.----Meltedmetal

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Helios View Post
                          Why would anyone bother trying to figure this out?

                          I mean, it makes about as much sense as trying to figure out what percentage of the price of a cup of coffee accounts for the sugar ... when you only use "Sweet 'n' Low."

                          Beyond concluding, "Gee, the figure is probably negligible," who cares?



                          Your machine spits out 42 feet of wire per second? Almost half a mile per minute? The recoil alone sounds dangerous!
                          I agree, calculating the electricity would be a waste of time.

                          Yes, I almost fell over when I saw that the MM252 can put out up to 700 inches per minute. I also make mistakes now and then, unlike nearly everyone else on the internet. LOL.

                          Anyway, it's fast but only 1/60th of what I mistakenly wrote.

                          I know, it's important to be correct all of the time. I leave that to my wife.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks for the detailed info Synchroman, and Broccoli1.
                            i didnt realize my sw200 wouldnt be much of a factor for electricity.
                            i will keep my eye on the gas usage when i get the first run of parts i will be doing at home in my shop after hours.... nice little side job, hopefully.

                            Syncroman, i agree, the MM252 is an awesome machine; we have 3 of them at work, two set up on steel and the other with a python push pull gun for aluminum... can burn it all day long without a hiccup...

                            thanks again guys.

                            Comment

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