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Stack of Dimes

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  • Stack of Dimes

    Well not exactly but its 3:30am and I couldn't sleep.

    Been thinking about a weld technique that might work well with long straight beads.
    I like the way you can push a lot of aluminum filler in for a nice raised bead.

    I have been wondering if it would be possible to feel the bead with the cup each time the cup slides over it add another bead and so forth.

    Maybe somebody has tried it. I think if you could feel each bead as you go over it then you could use it as a gage for spacing on the next and be able to make long runs with the exact same spacing.

    It would make a Purdy weld if they are the same to the eye. I know practice can put us close but I never tried to feel my way along with the cup.

    I'll try one day when I think of it out in the shop, any of you know of such a thing?

  • #2
    Your arc angle and distance would likely suffer from attempting it. Also the puddle is bead is quite "grabby" on the cup when it's still super hot I find. You had it right when you guessed practice, practice, practice, don't over complicate things.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by jrscgsr View Post
      Your arc angle and distance would likely suffer from attempting it. Also the puddle is bead is quite "grabby" on the cup when it's still super hot I find. You had it right when you guessed practice, practice, practice, don't over complicate things.
      Thanks for the reply, there is nothing worse than a cup that feels like it is glued down.
      I had seen a weld awhile back with short runs that were nothing short of fine art work.
      Trying to comprehend how leads me to think there is a hidden secret. I can throw a few dimes down but not consistent every time and certainly not over longer runs.

      Your angle and distance factor might be a big problem with this. I'm going to find out one day soon.

      Comment


      • #4
        It is very hard to be consistent if you don't do it every day. When I tig I notice a big difference in appearance from the beginning of a job to the end. Sometimes I can go weeks without tigging & it shows. Just part of the deal if you do some of everything.

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        • #5
          yea it does fade a little until you get back on it good.

          Been planning on it but a bud dropped off 4 feet of 6" sch 40 and I couldn't stop playing. Burned a bunch of ER 70-2 and a half a box of 7018 and still got pipe left over. It was like a day on the playground.

          Can't wait to do it again. Then maybe I'll prep some aluminum and test this thought.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yea scrap that thought of "feeling the beads" LOL

            I tried today and I invented some kind of magnetism between a ceramic cup and hot aluminum. Maybe on the edge of a new discovery or maybe its just to grabby like was said.

            Comment


            • #7
              It is just a question of rithym.

              Originally posted by Hardrock40 View Post
              Well not exactly but its 3:30am and I couldn't sleep.

              Been thinking about a weld technique that might work well with long straight beads.
              I like the way you can push a lot of aluminum filler in for a nice raised bead.

              I have been wondering if it would be possible to feel the bead with the cup each time the cup slides over it add another bead and so forth.

              Maybe somebody has tried it. I think if you could feel each bead as you go over it then you could use it as a gage for spacing on the next and be able to make long runs with the exact same spacing.

              It would make a Purdy weld if they are the same to the eye. I know practice can put us close but I never tried to feel my way along with the cup.

              I'll try one day when I think of it out in the shop, any of you know of such a thing?
              Trying to go by feel will bring nothing but frustration. Set up a rithym, and speed accordingly. The footpedal will of course, help dictate how fast you can go.
              Makes it a balancing act, too!

              Comment


              • #8
                Stack of Dimes

                No substitute for practice. No secret to nice GTAW beads.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I thought about "cheating" on making pretty welds by chucking the back end of the torch in my milling machine chuck, turn in the auto-feed and maybe even the pulse. Then just sit there and feed wire!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by nocheepgas View Post
                    I thought about "cheating" on making pretty welds by chucking the back end of the torch in my milling machine chuck, turn in the auto-feed and maybe even the pulse. Then just sit there and feed wire!
                    Hey! Nice idea! But I've got a better one since we are joking around. I'm a machinist. I can make a collar to slip around the head of your torch. Just slide it over the cup-then rock and roll! The collar will have training wheels off the side to keep the cup level, and the arc length perfect! Think I'll patent it! Ha!

                    Just kidding my friend! I could make something like that, but then where would be the challenge of tig?

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