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Miller 330A/BP power requirements

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  • Miller 330A/BP power requirements

    Hi, I am new to this forum. I recently aquired a 330/A/BP TIG welder, all 830 lbs of it. Got a load of accessories with it. It came from a welder friend who just got a pacemaker, and the doctor said no more welding for you. I have read good reviews of this machine, as far as it's durability goes. I am in the process of getting a hardcopy owners manual from Miller literature, to get my bearings for setup. I come from the A/C stick welder world, so TIG is new to me, so I will be on a learning curve. The machine is a whole lot bigger than what I need, both power wise and physical size also. It was too good of a deal to pass up. I am told this machine uses lots of power just for being turned on, without even welding. The machine requires 100A at 220v at full power. For my requirements, I certainly don't need to weld at 460 amps. Less than half that would be adequate. I already have a Lincoln 225A A/C welder on a 60A circuit with a dryer outlet. I have been getting mixed opinions on just using the 60A circuit for this welder, and using the lower and middle heat ranges only.

    If I were to go with the new 100A connection, are there any special tips or recommended hardware for wiring up this beast? I will be only 10 feet from the main breaker box in the garage. I have 200A service for the house. Any suggestions or advise would be appreciated.

  • #2
    Originally posted by GBertolet View Post
    The machine requires 100A at 220v at full power. For my requirements, I certainly don't need to weld at 460 amps. Less than half that would be adequate. I already have a Lincoln 225A A/C welder on a 60A circuit with a dryer outlet. I have been getting mixed opinions on just using the 60A circuit for this welder, and using the lower and middle heat ranges only.
    .
    Well if you went with a 60 amp input and kept your output settings below 60% (276 amps)

    I would think you would be fine... of course if you exceeded 60% you will likely pop a breaker...

    what model TIG torch are you running?? that is likely to be your limiting factor...
    most popular water cooled is a 20 series... good for about 250 amps...

    BTW..Welcome Aboard..!!... where in Pa are you located??

    Power requirements are on page 13 of the operators manual..

    http://www.millerwelds.com/om/o340p_mil.pdf
    Last edited by H80N; 08-28-2013, 07:17 PM.

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    • #3
      Welcome to the forum.
      Should be ok with the 60 amp as stated the worst should be trip the breaker.

      Comment


      • #4
        The writing on the torch, says TEC 18 350 AMP water cooled. I live in SE PA.
        Last edited by GBertolet; 08-29-2013, 08:15 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by GBertolet View Post
          The writing on the torch, says TEC 18 350 AMP water cooled. I live in SE PA.
          That is plenty of torch.... you will not be limited by torch capacity at 276 amps..

          how about water cooler and access??.... argon reg etc??

          Sounds like you might be ready to go

          How about some pics??

          Comment


          • #6
            Consumables

            FWIW... that torch shares consumables with the very popular 17 series aircooled torches... including ... back-caps, collet and collet bodies, ceramic cups, gas lens, etc..

            They should all be easily available from your LWS or online... and use standard interchangable part numbers and will accept consumables/parts from other brands as well...

            Here is a diagram with the standard part numbers..

            http://www.weldcraft.com/pdfs/WP18ENG.pdf

            Hope this helps..

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for all the info. Some of the extras I got with the welder are a cooler tank with pump, a helium and an argon tank with regulator, two extra torches, a hundred or so tungsten electrodes, mostly 3/32" red tips, about 100 ceramic cones, a box of collets and other misc torch parts, a foot pedal control, and about 50 lbs of misc stainless, aluminum, copper and steel filler rods.

              Still on the fence about the power supply though. Decisions, decisions???

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by GBertolet View Post
                Still on the fence about the power supply though. Decisions, decisions???
                Well it sounds like your 200 amp sysem entrance has enough headroom to allow a 100 amp breaker for the welder.. would be only intermittant use anyway right??

                if it is not a financial hardship... I would go for it...

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                • #9
                  Gas Bottle Ownership

                  One BIG caution on the gas bottles is to make sure that you have a written proof of ownership from the previous owner...

                  otherwise the gas supplier may try to confiscate them or try to lease them back to you...

                  this is a common battle on customer owned tanks...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hey GB, I had a 330 for 20 years, it was a great machine. Very smooth on the first two ranges but very rough on the hi-range when ac tig welding. Also very good for SMAW. Used it on a lot of MIL-STD work burning 7018 with the Hi-Freq turned on and using the foot pedal to control amps. You should hard wire it into a new box with a 100 amp breaker. When I first got the machine I had limited resources and had it on a 60 amp and every now and again when I hit the pedal the breaker would trip. In my very limited opinion you should use #4 copper wire, stay away from aluminum.
                    I also live in S/E pa- Ted

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                    • #11
                      Too late, I just bought the 100A service cable and 100A breaker this morning. It is aluminum though. The clerk said it's #3 wire. I am running the service cable to a box by the welder. The welder is only about 8 feet from the main box. There is a 6 foot piece of BX cable, with copper conductors hard wired to the welder by the previous owner. They look like #4 wire. That will be connected to the service cable at the junction box. I guess that will be OK. I know the electrons don't know the difference, but I am a little curious about the color code on the wires on this service cable.
                      I have the bare ground, red w/ 3 white stripes, black w/ 3 white stripes and a solid black wire. I think the black w/ 3 white stripes, or is it white w/ 3 black stripes, is to be the neutral.
                      I found steel 3" castors at the local TSC. They are rated for 300 lbs each. Should work for a 830 lb machine. At least I will be able to move the machine around on the concrete floor by myself, for maintenance if needed.
                      Last edited by GBertolet; 08-30-2013, 07:37 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GBertolet View Post
                        ...It (service cable) is aluminum though.... There is a 6 foot piece of BX cable, with copper conductors hard wired to the welder by the previous owner. They look like #4 wire. That will be connected to the service cable at the junction box. I guess that will be OK. I know the electrons don't know the difference....
                        You need to use the proper terminals and preparation for terminating aluminum wire. If not, expect a fire. Maybe not right away, but eventually. That is probably why you were advised to stay away from Aluminum.

                        If I understand correctly, you are going to splice the copper to the aluminum. This can be done, put has to be done properly.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          For me....

                          I would spend the extra and get copper...

                          aluminum wiring scares the bejeebers out of me....

                          it may be just fine.... but I would worry over it enough that it would be worth my while to invest in the copper.. just for the sake of peace of mind..

                          and I know it is all to easy for others to spend your hard earned dollars...

                          just my 2cents worth..
                          Last edited by H80N; 08-31-2013, 09:58 AM.

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