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How would you repair this.

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Hardrock40 View Post
    Wish I hadn't seen that. Now I'll be driving like Batman trying to get away from them on the highway.
    I can stand being behind, alongside or anywhere around one on the freeway. If I can't get around and way ahead I'll back way off. They remind me of those experimental bridges made from Popsicle sticks and tooth picks. Ready to completely collapse at any moment.

    Comment


    • #17
      I have to agree with Sandy, leave me a-lots of space on the freeway when the car haulers are around. Specially when they are going around curves (side to side sway) and hitting the humps (up and down humpiness), watch them and you'll see it.

      Just based on looking at too many of them. They are designed very lightweight to maximize $ cargo $ capacity $. They live a relatively short lifespan because of that. Owners run them well past that usable life.

      You'd think the dirt/rock hauler end dumps and transfers would be the low end in trucking world but they are far ahead of the car haulers based on my observation. That's antecdotal I know, but still, I steer clear of them in the truck or the Yukon, stay way, way away on a motorsickle. It's like following a plumbers flatbed, something just might fall off.

      I still haven't seen one I was willing to weld on, they are the dominoe effect in real time. I hate being a falling dominoe. If there's anything that will haunt you in welderland, it's a used/previously repaired car hauling trailer. My opinion only.

      We've put on a lot of underwheel lifts on big truck wreckers in the '90's'00's, and stretched and shortened many big truck frames, I'll do almost anything for money. The only hauler I'd work on is a relatively new one with minor damage.

      Everbody else can do whatever they want of course.

      J

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by JTMcC View Post
        Everbody else can do whatever they want of course.

        J
        Unfortunately for all of us that have to share the road, there's always somebody willing to make a quick buck.

        Comment


        • #19
          I would'nt have any problem repairing that and have been working on things like that for about 28 years.

          Fireman suggested stitch welding and thats the wrong answer, You want to repair the crack, Grind it flush and if the tube is 2" tall x 4" across, x 1/8" thick I would put a 3/8" thick x 4" wide plate across the bottom x However long the damaged area is approx. 8" long and fully weld it so water cannot get in between the plates and start rusting.
          I would cut the ears loose on the cylinder, put a plate on the top and fully weld it and then reweld the ears back onto the plate.
          __________________________________________________ __________________

          Keep in mind, I have been putting hitches on trucks forever, everything from a pick up truck to Gravel trains.
          __________________________________________________ __________________

          I draw the line however when it comes to hitches on cars, Not enouph frame for me.

          Comment


          • #20
            The trailers that scare me the most are the lumber haulers. I don't like all those cars swaying around but when you pull along side a 18 wheeler loaded with lumber and see the trailer flexing like a spring its time to hit the gas.

            I know they are designed to flex to prevent them from breaking but you see the weight of the load and know its a heavy beast.

            Luckily I was a ways back from one that blew a tire one day, there was crap flying everywhere all over the highway. BIG pieces that would do some serious damage.

            The comment about the plumbers truck and something falling off is too funny and true. Been there. I hate the roofers trailers loaded with torn off shingles and raining nails.

            Nothing like trying to pass a big dozer being hauled with dirt clods falling off and so hard they would bounce. I hit the passing lane and kicked it only to have one fly off the side, with a quick swerve it missed but took another 100 yards to get back in control of the car.

            Back to welding, my cuz who is a foreman over a pipe crew is all about NASCAR. He went on some kind of tour through one of the teams shop. I almost didn't believe him but he said the welds on the cars look like sheet. He couldn't believe it himself. I would like to see for myself.

            Comment


            • #21
              Good thread. I do all kinds of things, I turn a few things down now when it suits me and most of it is due to the customer. I wont put a local repair on something that should be condemned.

              I had a broad come in with a 30 yr old F100 truck with 1 poorly working brake and wants me to put a drop hitch on the factory bumper so she can hook on a 4 place horse trailer. I threatened to call the state police right there. Un real.

              Having the repair done is good. JT is spot on in the grand scheme of things and well worth heading, you got to be prepared or at least consider it. In the real world I am with Portable, its what I do but its done with the consideration with most of the issues JT stated and I could usually put a mechanical engineer on the stand to say so as well as a couple of truck inspectors the county or state might call as experts say I do good work above average and they can trust I fixed a known problem. "As a note I like the 5 times stronger comparisons. Good point, hard for many to understand not everything is as strong as it can be."

              I havnt studies as far as some but being a general fart in the wind over what is 30 some plus years have seen a few busted things, a lot of repairs survive, we fix a lot of engineered? equipment,,, most of it. I would rather see an attempted repair here than none.

              As a side note,, you aint lived till you tried to sue me anyway, ha

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Hardrock40 View Post



                Anyway, I'll not ever look for the ignore setting on anybody.



                Suit yourself.

                If I wasn't me, I'd put me on ignore.

                J

                Comment


                • #23
                  I didn't realize flat plate was stronger than angle. I learn something every day. I agree with welding it up tight but skipping around to minimize the amount of brittleness created by heat. The other problem is a weak spot will develop at the latteral weld line (at the ends of the plate or angle) due to the heat affecting the channel. Weld across a plate and do a bend test, it will bend at the weld area every time. When making sleds to hold rocket motors during test firing we had to be careful of this same situation. One must realize there are people that need to work and someone will need to fix this. I also wondered about a full modular replacement of this side channel. Might be costly but well worth the effort.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by JTMcC View Post
                    Suit yourself.

                    If I wasn't me, I'd put me on ignore.

                    J
                    Now THAT is Effin funny!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      FWIW, if I were to repair that, I would replace the tube section, or not at all. However, I wouldn't repair that, as those things scare the bejesus out of me. Won't even drive next to one if I can help it. Went to school with a guy that was crushed to death by one that had a failure.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Hey there Fireman, The problem was not the angle, It was more about stitch welding and letting salt water get between the 2 plates and the rust that would break the the welds within a year or so rolling down the highway.

                        When it comes to heat treated truck frames, Your right, welding across the frame is the first place that it will break.

                        However, The tubing on that car hauler is highly unlikely to be heat treated in that spot.
                        My weld certification which is a D1.1 - 3G position showed me that you can bend a weld into a U-shape without any cracks at all.

                        So your best to weld all the way around for this application.

                        To answer your question about what is stronger an angle or a plate on the top and bottom, The plate on the top and bottom is stronger.

                        Keep in mind that JtMc has made alot of good points as far as liability so I dont mean to discount what he has told you, I'm not an engineer but have done a ton of repairs over the last 25 years with the guidance of several engineers which has taught me the proper methods of how to repair stuff.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Man that stinks. Don't want to be crushed to death for sure.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I got a 5 gal bucket of small welding coupons are perfect for this.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Well a known problem went down the road without a repair, more common than one might think and in the grand scheme of things may be worse or ar least nop better than the unqualified giving it a shot? That remark was not aimed at the OP who probably would have3 done a fine job. The guys that don't and don't care are not posting here.

                              It could be made passable with a couple pieces of plate and half a dozen small bolts. Might not last forever but neither did the original. I say some context is in order.

                              There are lots of bad welders, lots of them been doing it a long time aint no better than the beginners. I seen it all as many of the other guys have including a repair we took where the owner of the big welding company with the towns name on it must have sent the 16 yr old enough to drive and a welder to fix equipment at a hospital, come to find out this might not been so stupid as it happened a couple times.

                              Any journeyman worth a darn could have made a permanent repair in a couple hrs. This is the problem as much as any other. If the customer had called in Canada maybe or other places welding is more regulated he might have stood a chance but here you never know who is showing up. In the world JT lives in lots of testing and production demands weed out the help.

                              A guy like Joe here or Portable that answers their own phones and shows up personal to do the work, a company owner they will get a great job every time. Many of the repairs are hooked to welding skill mostly in the fact that the amateur doesn't have the strong out of position stick skills to facilitate the design of a good repair, it doesn't mean I wont make it as easy to do as I can but there is no faking good out of position stick skills.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
                                I would'nt have any problem repairing that and have been working on things like that for about 28 years.


                                __________________________________________________ __________________

                                Keep in mind, I have been putting hitches on trucks forever, everything from a pick up truck to Gravel trains.
                                __________________________________________________ __________________

                                I draw the line however when it comes to hitches on cars, Not enouph frame for me.





                                I've got no problem welding on big trucks or trailers. We've stretched/shortened quite a few big truck frames and welded in a bunch of wheel lifts on big truck recovery trucks when the truck front ends went to plastic in the '90's.
                                I couldn't count the number of frame welds I've made on 250 ton haul trucks.

                                But every car hauler trailer I've ever been called on was too far gone. And broke down on the side of the road or in a truck stop.

                                J

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