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XMT corrosion- Is this normal?

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  • XMT corrosion- Is this normal?

    Name:  2a164e5376c5680c4c956063facbde86.jpg
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Size:  41.7 KBName:  11137ca97298ffe03a7bcc1113e22d0c.jpg
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Size:  35.9 KB Here are pics of my xmt 350. Inside I have 3 places that look to be corrosion on the connectors. This unit is about 4 years old. My other two which are 2 years old do not have this, however they are not used much.

  • #2
    I was thinking overheating too. Essentially the connection point on those wires can have more resistance than the wire itself. Push a bunch of current through that connection point and it will get hot and the wire will discolor like that. You could always check the connection with an ohm meter to see if there is much resistance in the line, but I'm not sure if a meter will read low enough for you.
    You can also run the welder for a bit and then open it up with it off and see if those points are getting hot.

    It won't take much resistance for the connection to get hot since your dealing with hundreds of amps on the output side of the welder and the power loss through that connection point will be (current)^2 x resistance = Power loss (watts).

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    • #3
      Originally posted by fabricator View Post
      Name:  2a164e5376c5680c4c956063facbde86.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  41.7 KBName:  11137ca97298ffe03a7bcc1113e22d0c.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  35.9 KB Here are pics of my xmt 350. Inside I have 3 places that look to be corrosion on the connectors. This unit is about 4 years old. My other two which are 2 years old do not have this, however they are not used much.
      Looks like rosin flux residue from soldering the terminals...

      Not overheating..

      while ugly... do not think it will do any harm..

      am surprised that they were not defluxed at the factory though...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by H80N View Post
        Looks like rosin flux residue from soldering the terminals...

        Not overheating..

        while ugly... do not think it will do any harm..

        am surprised that they were not defluxed at the factory though...
        This is what I was thinking but was not sure if they soldered these connections or not.

        Comment


        • #5
          Agreeing with those suggesting the discoloration is related to an overheat condition. I looked at my XMT and there was no discoloration on those connections. Neither was there any sign of solder; the connections were crimped, period.

          I suggest you check the tightness of your connections after going through the shutdown/unplug/discharge steps to ensure you're safe from shock. Also re-torque the capacitor connections according to Miller specs to prevent a catastrophic melt-down (speaking from experience here). You'll need an in/lbs torque wrench or driver to do it.

          Do a search of cruizer's posts to see him recommend what I'm talking about (got the idea from him anyway). Good luck.

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          • #6
            This is completely NORMAL, no heat issues, no nothin, wrap the case up and don't give it a second thought....

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            • #7
              Normal normal normal

              This is totally normal and is the way it left the factory.
              Each strand of those wires are insulated and have to be burnt off while crimping to get a solid connection.
              This type of wire is used in the higher frequency, current carrying areas of the inverters.

              A-

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