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dry cut saw-- also called cold cut saw Question

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  • #16
    sure

    I went to three businesses today that sell Milwaukee products. Two of them had no idea either until they got on their computer and found they couldn't order one. The third business said he knew about it and said it happened about 6 months ago. Said something about them getting out of the metal cutting saws. That's what I found out just today. If you still don't believe me I guess you can go to a Milwaukee dealer and ask them..

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    • #17
      Milwaukee still shows it in their line up. http://www.milwaukeetool.com/power-tools/corded/6190-20

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      • #18
        The steelmax has a junk vise on it already been thru the THIRD one , our dealer sent two replacements and the didnt last no time then sent a second saw with the same problem. Run from them. They also didnt do anything about the two ruined New blades , if you have any movement while cutting your going to ruin the blade.
        If you can find the Milwakee , i have heard good comments on them.

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        • #19
          Dry Cut Metal Cutting Saws

          We've been using the Milwaukee dry cut saws for several years now without any problems other than blade replacement. We have both the miter type saw and the 8" hand held circular saws. We found that blade life is considerably longer if the stock is clamped properly and in the case of the hand held saw, a guide is clamped to the stock for the saw to ride against. Keeping the blade from binding in the cut saves the teeth on the blade. One great benefit of using dry cut saws over plasma, torches, or abrasive saws is that the material can be picked up and used immediately even with bare hands because it doesn't heat up significantly during the cut. The finished cut is relatively smooth so very little clean-up is required. A file or light grinding to remove the bur is usually all that is necessary.

          The miter saw was a bit hard to move around both in the shop and to the jobsite, and supporting the stock was difficult when cutting miters because either the position of the stock or the angle of the saw needed to change every time the angle of cut needed to change. I bought a Delta miter saw/planer stand similar to a hand when folded for easy transport. It can sit upright like a hand truck with the saw still attached when being stored, can be wheeled to the worksite like a hand truck, and can be opened to workbench height very easily. It also loads and unloads easily from truck bed. I added an aluminum top, a 12" Lazy Susan type bearing, and a piece of 1/4" aluminum plate to hold the Milwaukee saw to the top of this stand. Now we have a saw that stores and transports very easily, can be set up and ready to cut almost instantly, and has pull-out rollers to help support the stock. When cutting miters, only the saw rotates to allow easy clamping of the stock at any angle. The Lazy Susan bearing under the saw allows the saw to easily rotate to the stock position so you don't need to keep moving the stock position for each different angle cut. The Delta stand is a bit light for this purpose, but it has held up very well for the past several years. Most of our cuts are on bar, strip, and angle stock up to about 2" X 2" and the biggest problem so far has been keeping the outboard roller height adjustments from slipping under the heavier stock weights. We generally use additional separate stock supports if the stock weight will be over 60 lbs or longer than about 10'.

          Charley
          Attached Files
          ______________________________
          Miller MM252
          Miller Bobcat 225NT
          Miller DialArc HF & DIY Cooler
          2 Miller Digital Elite and 3 Fixed Shade Helmets
          2 O/A torch sets
          DeWalt 18 volt 1/2" Driver/Drill
          DeWalt 18 volt 6 1/2" Metal Saw
          DeWalt Porta Band & SWAG Offroad V3 Table
          Milwaukee 8" Dry Cut Saw
          Milwaukee 14" Dry Cut Chop Saw / Delta Stand
          Milwaukee 9" Grinder
          2 Milwaukee 4 1/2" Grinders
          Milwaukee Hole Hawg 1/2" Drill
          Wallace 5 Ton Gantry
          Too many hand tools

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          • #20
            Originally posted by CharleyL View Post
            We've been using the Milwaukee dry cut saws for several years now without any problems other than blade replacement. We have both the miter type saw and the 8" hand held circular saws. We found that blade life is considerably longer if the stock is clamped properly and in the case of the hand held saw, a guide is clamped to the stock for the saw to ride against. Keeping the blade from binding in the cut saves the teeth on the blade. One great benefit of using dry cut saws over plasma, torches, or abrasive saws is that the material can be picked up and used immediately even with bare hands because it doesn't heat up significantly during the cut. The finished cut is relatively smooth so very little clean-up is required. A file or light grinding to remove the bur is usually all that is necessary.

            The miter saw was a bit hard to move around both in the shop and to the jobsite, and supporting the stock was difficult when cutting miters because either the position of the stock or the angle of the saw needed to change every time the angle of cut needed to change. I bought a Delta miter saw/planer stand similar to a hand when folded for easy transport. It can sit upright like a hand truck with the saw still attached when being stored, can be wheeled to the worksite like a hand truck, and can be opened to workbench height very easily. It also loads and unloads easily from truck bed. I added an aluminum top, a 12" Lazy Susan type bearing, and a piece of 1/4" aluminum plate to hold the Milwaukee saw to the top of this stand. Now we have a saw that stores and transports very easily, can be set up and ready to cut almost instantly, and has pull-out rollers to help support the stock. When cutting miters, only the saw rotates to allow easy clamping of the stock at any angle. The Lazy Susan bearing under the saw allows the saw to easily rotate to the stock position so you don't need to keep moving the stock position for each different angle cut. The Delta stand is a bit light for this purpose, but it has held up very well for the past several years. Most of our cuts are on bar, strip, and angle stock up to about 2" X 2" and the biggest problem so far has been keeping the outboard roller height adjustments from slipping under the heavier stock weights. We generally use additional separate stock supports if the stock weight will be over 60 lbs or longer than about 10'.

            Charley
            That's a very slick set up Charley.

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            • #21
              Here is just one of the Google results for the Milwaukie saw
              http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...6465_200486465

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              • #22
                I know this is a little off topic but since I just had to deal with this I will share this. I have the dewalt 14 inch multi cutter cold saw(dw872). The blades on the Milwaukee can not be resharpened but the dewalt blades can be. I found this out because I bought a backup blade for 125.00 while my dewalt blade is resharpened, found out the blade i bought couldnt be resharpened just my mistake. But just beware of some of these blades cannot be resharpened

                oh and I love the saw it cuts great but the clamping system is a little off but I just take a speed square and double check the angles before I cut anything. FYI good luck
                Last edited by nywelder; 07-08-2013, 06:50 PM.

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