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Bought one of these today

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  • #16
    Thanks for the replies to both of you. So it is the moisture in the air supply that eats the consumables. I've heard lots about air driers for plasma but I suppose everyone figured I already knew why. I guess that's why they sometimes use nitrogen instead of air. Nitrogen about the same cost as oxygen? Anyway nitrogen doesn't solve my issue either. I'm trying to avoid tank rental fees. We can't own cylinders here except for the really tiny ones that I find too small and too expensive to be useful for what I do. I was hoping for something light and portable that I could use at home that I don't have to keep paying on whether I use it or not. Given other discussions about inverters aging and storage maybe that's not a great idea either although I don't know that I buy into that either. Between work, renovations and the demands of family life I don't get as much leisure time as I'd like. Food for thought.Thanks.
    Meltedmetal

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
      I'm surprised to hear you would rather use o/a rather than your plasma. I have loved my plasma since I got it. The consumables are cheap for my machine and they last a long time if I don't get backs plashing. What plasma machine do you have? I do hear ya on oxy being a little more portable, but acetylene is not cheap and air is free. My plasma is dual voltage, and can cut 1/4" on 110v, while running off my small job site portable compressor.

      Really interested to see a cut from your new shears too. I have always been happy with makita products, I'm sure you will love this!
      I don't have anything against Plasma, it's the extra cost involved if I want to use it full time. When I started metal work they didn't have plasma on the job or in shops so I'm used to O/A and don't have issues with it.

      It's like why do I need to have plasma? Not one of my projects or repairs have been done with Plasma. I honestly get along fine without it... just like I did before plasma became popular and a common tool in the shop.

      I'll put some 10 ga cut pictures up after I get the tool and go over the adjustments.

      The shear is just another arrow in the tool quiver. I have been wanting one for long time and a 10 ga project is at hand. From information I have gleaned over the internet shears are better for what I want to do.

      My Ellis 1600 is by far the shops work horse.




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      • #18
        Time is money.....I GUARANTEE you that I can cut a sheet of 10 gauge with my Hypertherm 1000 with a drag tip on it all the way across in less than 10 seconds.....name me one person that can do that with OA? OA can cut decently fast on a track torch setup(which takes for ever to set up) and decently fast with a guide(but only until you skip a beat in your heart rate and need to restart the cut). Hardly any prep after plasma either. I can and do use a 00 tip on my torch hear and there and I consider myself pretty ****ed good with a torch but for sheetmetal you can not beat plasma......and at home I have an airline filter and dryer but at work it's about the dirtiest air you can get and no problems.....what time is involved in plasma setup? Hook up the ground and airline and go at it? Probably takes the same amount of time to get shear out of cabinet and run extension cord. Dave
        Originally posted by tackit View Post
        I don't have anything against Plasma, it's the extra cost involved if I want to use it full time. When I started metal work they didn't have plasma on the job or in shops so I'm used to O/A and don't have issues with it.

        It's like why do I need to have plasma? Not one of my projects or repairs have been done with Plasma. I honestly get along fine without it... just like I did before plasma became popular and a common tool in the shop.

        I'll put some 10 ga cut pictures up after I get the tool and go over the adjustments.

        The shear is just another arrow in the tool quiver. I have been wanting one for long time and a 10 ga project is at hand. From information I have gleaned over the internet shears are better for what I want to do.

        My Ellis 1600 is by far the shops work horse.




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        • #19
          I get sick and tired of hearing how fast someone can cut with a plasma, I don't know of anyone who sees how many cuts he can make per second plasma vs O/A... I ain't in no hurry and clean up is no problem.

          Time is money... give me a break, I'm not a fab shop so the speed of lightening and few taps to knock off slag are non issues for me. Go buy another plasma, with practice you can cut with both hands and really impress those who care how fast your are.

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          • #20
            Manufactures make the tools so we can buy them. Each tool has its place and each person has his or her tool of choice. Some of us can afford them all and others cannot afford shoelaces. It's what you have and how you make it work.
            A old guy told me that anybody could do it with the right tool.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by BD1 View Post
              Manufactures make the tools so we can buy them. Each tool has its place and each person has his or her tool of choice. Some of us can afford them all and others cannot afford shoelaces. It's what you have and how you make it work.
              A old guy told me that anybody could do it with the right tool.
              Exactly right BD1. Me not getting hyped up over plasma is nothing more than a personal choice... right/wrong does not apply. I have been using O/A with no problems for years so why do I "have" to use a plasma cutter and why do I "have" to cut at break neck speeds? Different strokes for different folks applies here.

              I'm a bit confused on the moisture issue.... seems like some plasma users spend a ton of money on equipment to remove moisture from their air lines to extend consumable life while others spend under a hundred bucks. Something don't jibe.

              I don't spray paint or use air tools that often I should sink a bunch of cash into a airline so I can cut steel faster than the speed of light. 99% of my saws and drills run off electric not air. I don't work with roller skates on either.

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              • #22
                well...I do a lot of bucket repair and you would have a hard time cutting through hard surface with a torch.....air arc or plasma is a must.if this is a pride thiing well ok then....I do plenty of my sidework with TIG just because.....but when someone is paying u to do work u do the most efficient job u can, no?
                Originally posted by tackit View Post
                Exactly right BD1. Me not getting hyped up over plasma is nothing more than a personal choice... right/wrong does not apply. I have been using O/A with no problems for years so why do I "have" to use a plasma cutter and why do I "have" to cut at break neck speeds? Different strokes for different folks applies here.

                I'm a bit confused on the moisture issue.... seems like some plasma users spend a ton of money on equipment to remove moisture from their air lines to extend consumable life while others spend under a hundred bucks. Something don't jibe.

                I don't spray paint or use air tools that often I should sink a bunch of cash into a airline so I can cut steel faster than the speed of light. 99% of my saws and drills run off electric not air. I don't work with roller skates on either.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by turbo38t View Post
                  well...I do a lot of bucket repair and you would have a hard time cutting through hard surface with a torch.....air arc or plasma is a must.if this is a pride thiing well ok then....I do plenty of my sidework with TIG just because.....but when someone is paying u to do work u do the most efficient job u can, no?
                  I agree. When you do A LOT of the same work and a SPECIFIC TOOL will be more efficient, increase productivity, and you can pass some of the cost on to the customer then fine. You gotta do it.
                  It's the same with buying quality tools. Everybody likes the big buck stuff. If you can afford them great. I was gonna buy the Milwaukee metal cutting circular saw for a specific project. Saw the price and figured it would take a long time to pay for it self . I bought the cheap harbor freight one and I can't believe it is still running. I've had such great results with it I know it will die now that I said this.

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                  • #24
                    I am not trying to be an ass with my replies. It just sounded like he was saying that a plasma wasn't worth it's weight.....two weeks ago a coworker and I had to skin 14 wooden concrete radius forms. This required upwards of 50 sheets of 14 gauge sheet metal. We had to trim every piece **** near......don't know what I would have done without the plasma....
                    Originally posted by BD1 View Post
                    I agree. When you do A LOT of the same work and a SPECIFIC TOOL will be more efficient, increase productivity, and you can pass some of the cost on to the customer then fine. You gotta do it.
                    It's the same with buying quality tools. Everybody likes the big buck stuff. If you can afford them great. I was gonna buy the Milwaukee metal cutting circular saw for a specific project. Saw the price and figured it would take a long time to pay for it self . I bought the cheap harbor freight one and I can't believe it is still running. I've had such great results with it I know it will die now that I said this.

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                    • #25
                      holy crap, makita still makes them things, i bought one back in 1987 for 500 bucks, i still have it, cutting 10 ga is a work out, especially long straight cuts, the steel after the cut rides up on the base, you will need to grap that thing real hard to keep it going and muscle it thru. also watch for sharp small pieces of steel coming up from underneath just trying to nail your fingers to the tool, have fun,

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                      • #26
                        You guys arguing with tackit are spitting in the wind. He never said Plasma was bad, just that in HIS experience, HE did not need it. YMMV

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by kevin View Post
                          holy crap, makita still makes them things, i bought one back in 1987 for 500 bucks, i still have it, cutting 10 ga is a work out, especially long straight cuts, the steel after the cut rides up on the base, you will need to grap that thing real hard to keep it going and muscle it thru. also watch for sharp small pieces of steel coming up from underneath just trying to nail your fingers to the tool, have fun,
                          Yep, my Bosch 6 ga. will treat you as badly as an old triple reduction 3/4" drill that gets stuck...arms, legs, whatever available body part can and will take a beating.

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                          • #28
                            After all the negative comments about the machine I'm going to send it back. I asked about the machine on a couple of websites before I ordered it and no one brought up these serious problems .... Thanks for the negative information, I'll be sending it back...TODAY.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by cope View Post
                              You guys arguing with tackit are spitting in the wind. He never said Plasma was bad, just that in HIS experience, HE did not need it. YMMV
                              Your right cope, I don't have a problem with plasma as a cutting tool..

                              It's just I don't have the proper air system to run Plasma full time and I'm not going to spend a lot of money on a air system I use mostly to pump up tires and run air tools occasionally, which do fine with the $100 NAPA filter/regulator I have coming off the tank.


                              I have an electric powered Evolution circular saw, Ellis 1600 bandsaw, Milwaukee Port a Band, Milwaukee Chop Saw and my O/A outfit and tip cleaners to cut steel with, I'm in no bind because I don't use Plasma. All I'm saying is I'm not investing in an expensive air system just to run a plasma machine that I can do without.
                              Last edited by tackit; 06-05-2013, 12:23 PM.

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                              • #30
                                Came across this picture of a BP air line after only a few years of service. It was on an air compressor manufacturer's website. They were pushing their aluminum piping system which must be latest in airline technology today.

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