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tucked in welding shirts or not?

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  • tucked in welding shirts or not?

    I need reasons why welders don't tuck in their welding shirts, our safety wants us to tuck in our welding shirts !!!

  • #2
    Because when you get a big hot spark that goes in the top 99% of the time you can keep it rolling right down a pant leg and out a bottom. Now if you wear slip on boots you still may have a hot foot....Bob

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    • #3
      Your safety people are probably thinking about you catching your shirt in a side grinder. Does your welding job also require you to work around revolving shafts, moving belts or large stationary grinders? I've had my shirt tail get caught in a 7" grinder that had a wire wheel on it a couple of times.

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      • #4
        I don't tuck my shirt in and the reasons are:

        1) so that sparks/hot slag don't end up getting stuck between my shirt and pants and burning themselves out there.

        2) So that spatter that once in a while goes down my shirt from around my neck falls right out on the ground unless it gets stuck between my tucked in t-shirt and my pants (kinda like 1 above).

        Ask me how I know 1 and 2 above. Ask me how easy it is to get one of those little buggers out of there when it's smoking hot. You just end up s uc king it up.

        If it's not tucked in the sparks just fall to the ground. If there wasn't a REAL danger of the shirt tails getting caught on something dangerous, getting set on fire, your getting pulled into some machinary because of them not being tucked in, I'd tell you safety guy to go pound sand and then go where ever that ride takes you without caving in (short of getting fired).

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        • #5
          t-shirt tucked in & welding shirt out. All sparks & slag that hit your shirt just roll/bounce off instead of having a chance to get stuck in your waistline. I can see the shirttail getting caught can be a hazard also but you'll need to pick the least dangerous.

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          • #6
            tucked in welding shirts or not?

            My helper does the grinder & buffer work , I don't !
            Thanks for the input guys !

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            • #7
              Shirt un- tucked. And you will shed slag like a roof sheds water. Sometimes if I'm scarfin bucket teeth off or making a lot of slag torching, I got leathers I wear over my boot laces ( my ankles are too trashed for pull on boots).

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              • #8
                Whatever works for you. I always wear cotton blue pants and long button down top over a tshirt. I always tuck them both in. U learn how to not burn yourself. I prefer to have a clean look rather than the hobo look. Throw a leather weld jacket on over top if you are burning yourself that bad. I more often get burnt by slag I chip off that sit on top of my knee or on my forearms....Dave

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                • #9
                  In The Trenches

                  I do 95% of my welding in the trenches, although I guess that gives me the "Hobo" look, it keeps my pockets and the back of my underwear getting full of dirt. Welding, just what the other guys posted, keeps the slag running downhill.

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                  • #10
                    tucked in welding shirts or not?

                    The thing is guys that Aera the contractor that runs the oil lease after 20 years of not tucking in our welding shirts wants everyone to tuck them in now ,this is coming from there safety department , from people that don't no anything about the trade !

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                    • #11
                      Maybe they just can't stand welders that don't have the "clean" look!
                      You know, welders that look like a bunch of "hobos".

                      What do they say when you wear you welding jacket? Do they want you to tuck that into you pants too?.

                      Sounds like you've got the fashion police working at your place now.

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                      • #12
                        tucked in welding shirts or not?

                        Thank you welders for your input , Much appreciated !

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                        • #13
                          I don't tuck my shirt in. But a cup brush on a 4 1/2" grinder sure will make you think about it for a minute or two. At least until you can breath again.

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                          • #14
                            At my company they supply fireproof coveralls, and couldn't care less what's underneath, myself in the summer, it's short and tank top not tucked in my short, because I've been burn you know where from trying to get rid of a hot slag that made it's way all the way there.
                            So it's not tucked in for me in the summer and turtle neck tucked in, in the winter.

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                            • #15
                              I treat my welding attire as flashing... and I will reorient the laps to shed sparks as needed. I've had safety "officers" give me grief before.... funny how they will "go away" when one is cutting off a beam, and the spray from the torch or the plasma heads their way

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