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Calling USMCPOP

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  • Calling USMCPOP

    USMCPOP, could you recommend a good blacksmith book. Thanks

  • #2
    For a beginner, The Complete Modern Blacksmith by Alexander Weygers might be worth a look. I had an earlier version of this book.

    There should be more book reviews here:

    http://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/1909...rn-blacksmith/

    You can see a preview of the book here: books.google.com/books?id=3Vzrz_A70eAC

    Note that he's a bit off as far as quenching (water vs. oil). See the review.
    Last edited by USMCPOP; 05-15-2013, 08:28 AM.

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    • #3
      Thank you USMCPOP, I knew you would be the man to talk to, much obliged sir.

      I'll order Wegers book and I'll take a look at the other reviews tonight .

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      • #4
        Alex's book may have a few boo-boos, but it's a good read. He was trained as a blacksmith way back upon a time in Europe, became an engineer, then an artist and sculptor. Very interesting guy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Weygers

        One time the local community college here offered a blacksmithing class. It was hosted by a local guy in his shop. It was great to walk into a shop with coal forges and all the stuff and just start banging away. I'd already had a wee bit of experience and a lot of windshield time watching a blacksmith in Thailand when I was in the Peace Corps. Someone shows you a thing like a letter opener or spoon or something, gives you a few pointers and turns you loose. Shaping hot metal to your will with only a dim idea of where you are going is very satisfying. Or should I say it engages all of your being, so there's only you and the metal, willing it into shape. Teacher said I made a couple of the things and he wasn't sure if he did it or I did. That was a nice compliment.
        Last edited by USMCPOP; 05-15-2013, 04:06 PM.

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        • #5
          Here's a video on YouTube . 1922 black smithing you might like.
          http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=k_LA_...%3Dk_LA_R4ifYk

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          • #6
            Originally posted by USMCPOP View Post
            Alex's book may have a few boo-boos, but it's a good read. He was trained as a blacksmith way back upon a time in Europe, became an engineer, then an artist and sculptor. Very interesting guy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Weygers
            I ordered it and Back Yard Blacksmith, I can't wait to get them... My projects are getting to be much of the same O' same O'.... boring and uninspiring, plus I have run out of space to store them, I'm thinking about salvaging the steel from a couple projects...

            Just building a forge out of a truck's brake drum sounds interesting and fun. I have the SIL looking for an anvil for me, he lives in a real rural area of the state, hope he spies one and some tools in a yard sale for me..

            Thanks Kpack, I'll watch it.

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            • #7
              The guys in Thailand I worked with had minimal equipment. The fuel was hardwood charcoal, not to be wasted. The "anvil" was more often than not a 12-16 pound sledgehammer head sunk into a hard log. The forge was a couple lumps of clay mud with bamboo air pipe from a hollowed out log or two that looked like a butter churn. The air seal on the wooden piston in the air pump was chicken feathers stuck on with tar. Fancy ones used a bit of inner-tube as a flap seal.

              They made stuff like this.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by USMCPOP View Post
                The guys in Thailand I worked with had minimal equipment. The fuel was hardwood charcoal, not to be wasted. The "anvil" was more often than not a 12-16 pound sledgehammer head sunk into a hard log. The forge was a couple lumps of clay mud with bamboo air pipe from a hollowed out log or two that looked like a butter churn. The air seal on the wooden piston in the air pump was chicken feathers stuck on with tar. Fancy ones used a bit of inner-tube as a flap seal.

                They made stuff like this.

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                That's really interesting USMCPOP, thanks for the pictures, it's incredible how people in the third world can be so industrious with only what's at hand....

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                • #9
                  Good video Kpack, I'm going to have to find an old steel deck off a lawn mower.. Thanks again...

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                  • #10
                    Calling USMCPOP

                    I have The Backyard Blacksmith by Lorelei Sims although female Blacksmith are rare, she did a very good job with this book, I liked it.
                    Also have The Art of Blacksmithing by Alex W. Bealer it's also a pretty good book, 430 pages with 500 Illustrations.
                    I also have some paper back books reprinted by Lindsay publications they were 1st. printed around 1906. They were very cheap but some great old time practices that are fast becoming lost.
                    All in all the best book I have is a paper back book I found at a big book store on a close out table for less than $20.00. I can't remember name and I loaned it out to a friend and he hasn't returned it yet. Metals, heat treating, annealing etc. very old and has priceless info on how they did it in the old days. It's a awesome read.
                    When I get it back ill try & post it.
                    Greg

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                    • #11
                      Calling USMCPOP

                      The coal forge is worth mastering and still has many benefits. But for simplicity quickness and by far cleaner, buy or build a propane forge and start making.
                      Propane is quick & clean cheap, can use in shop. It's a good starter and truthfully I haven't used coal in quite awhile, used my propane this morning.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by gnforge View Post
                        The coal forge is worth mastering and still has many benefits. But for simplicity quickness and by far cleaner, buy or build a propane forge and start making.
                        Propane is quick & clean cheap, can use in shop. It's a good starter and truthfully I haven't used coal in quite awhile, used my propane this morning.
                        gnforge I figure I need to see if I have the skill before I invest in something more expensive. I want to come at it slow so I don't burn out over mistakes and disappointments... Allot of reading and trial and air and watching videos I think will be best for me. If and when I feel worthy I would buy a gas forge and get to work. Thanks for comment, I appreciate your input. :-)

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                        • #13
                          A washtub type of forge is easy to make.

                          http://www.timlively.com/arrowheadwtf.htm

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                          • #14
                            The article says Bentonite can be used instead of earthen clay for making the adobe .


                            Interesting fact about Bentonite: It can also be used as a desiccant due to its adsorption properties. Bentonite desiccants have been successfully used to protect pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and diagnostic products from moisture degradation and extend shelf life. In fact, in the most common package environments, Bentonite Desiccants offer a higher adsorption capacity than silica gel desiccants. Bentonite complies with the FDA for contact with food and drugs.

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bentonite

                            http://www.bentonite.com/Default.asp...3a%3aJVKK8FESH
                            Last edited by tackit; 05-16-2013, 08:33 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Just got off the phone with www.bentonite.com, they said cat litter and I suppose any bentonite product that has a perfume in it will not work. The perfume retards bentonites' moisture absorbing properties.

                              The man I spoke to said he put's bentonite in a card board box and puts it in his gun safe. I'm thinking you could put some in a nylon stocking and stuff it in a 3" pipe to make a homemade air drier for the compressor out of it.

                              Unfortunately they only sell it by the truck load.... I have to google a chemical firm that sells their National Premium WT to build the forge and have gun protection....

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