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mobile welding and low H rods

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  • mobile welding and low H rods

    Im drawing a blank on this but the answer has to be simple...for mobile welders how do you keep your supply of low H rods hot? Yes, I know w/ a rod oven but how is it powered in the field?

    ETA: In fact do you keep your low H wire hot between jobs/overnight? This would serve 2 purposes...maintaining the low H characteristics and preventing rust.
    Last edited by HayFarmer; 05-10-2013, 10:16 AM.

  • #2
    Since I am not doing code work they lay in the box until used. No rod oven. FYI unless you buy the hermetically sealed containers they are already exposed. The cardboard or plastic container does not seal. I would imagine for what your using them for no rod oven needed.

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    • #3
      No oven for me either. I like how they weld and always make it my first choice...Bob

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      • #4
        mobile welding and low H rods

        Simple answer would be a small rod oven I've seen guys with them the smallest one I've seen is slightly bigger than a 50lbs rod can so I assume it can hold the whole 50lbs. Where ever they park there rig is probably where the plug the oven in when they are not on a job and during a job just plug it into whatever power source they have

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        • #5
          I use a Lincoln 10# oven. Plugs into my welder, it doesn't pull many amps. I also keep the rest of the 50# can in sealed rod tubes

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          • #6
            if you are on a larger job, there is quite often a 50 or 100lb oven that is left on all the time and you transfer rod to your smaller 10lb oven as you need.

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            • #7
              mobile welding and low H rods

              If I need to weld something that critical then I will buy them for that job usually in smaller containers. So it's not one big thing that's been "opened". That said, I have leftover junk rod all over my garage bought in garage sales, past jobs etc... I don't know off the top of my head but there is "allegedly" a way to recondition LH rod in your home oven if its not in too bad shape (ruined flux, rusted etc....). I'm no expert though.

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              • #8
                I keep mine in these rod holder and have not had any problems. If moisture was was super critical I would think you would have to get the moisture out of the steel you're welding on too. http://www.rodguard.net/

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                • #9
                  There is no moisture in the steel.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sberry View Post
                    There is no moisture in the steel.
                    Then why does steel rust?

                    If I'm short circuit welding on something and it's a cold and dank day I take my torch and warm it up, you can see the waves of moisture leaving the steel.

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                    • #11
                      I agree with sberry on this. Except for small amounts trapped in rust or scale on the surface the steel, unless it is porous, steel has no water in it. Steel is produced at upwards of 2500 degrees and no water lives there. The condition you observe is caused by moisture in the warm air of your torch condensing in the colder air and on the colder surface of the steel. The dew point in your flame and in the surrounding air are different. We see this often in our work where we pour molten metal into metal moulds. We always preheat to eliminate the possibility of moisture as the moulds are iron and they rust which can trap moisture on the surface. Failure to preheat can result in a steam driven explosion that can give the worker a faceful of molten metal. Not a fun day, been there done that and don't want to try it again.---Meltedmetal

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                      • #12
                        You know the more I'm wrong here the smarter I get. Thanks for setting me straight MM.

                        I'm not talking about moisture in the steel.... but on the surface in the pours.
                        Last edited by tackit; 05-11-2013, 01:39 PM.

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                        • #13
                          tackit
                          I think thats correct. Part of preheating is about driving off residual moisture.

                          Thanks for all the replies!

                          One thing not answered which I would still like to know is how you all handle large spools of wire that last for more than a couple weeks? Isnt rust a problem in the summer?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by HayFarmer View Post
                            tackit
                            I think thats correct. Part of preheating is about driving off residual moisture.

                            Thanks for all the replies!

                            One thing not answered which I would still like to know is how you all handle large spools of wire that last for more than a couple weeks? Isnt rust a problem in the summer?
                            Where I live winter going into spring makes tons of moisture, it puts a light coat of rust on all steel that's not been oiled or chromed. Summer here is pretty dry.... never have problems with rust during summer months..

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                            • #15
                              mobile welding and low H rods

                              Some wire comes with a special moisture resistant or absorbent paper over wire & inside a sealed plastic bag. I save the paper (keep in a zip lock bag) when take off a roll of wire even if it didn't come with one, I place paper over wire (it's directional) then put in a big zip lock bag or put in original bag & seal with tape.
                              Another trick is to save the little moisture pacs or paper that come in parts or buy them & do the same. Keeps moisture off wire wile not in use.
                              I also keep in a room on shelf off floor.
                              Another tip is to keep shop at constant temp, doesn't need to be warm just keep from drastic temp changes. I hv in floor heat & keep it at 59-60 deg. year round even spring & fall, keeps temp from dropping on cool nights. Helps keep rust on metal and also equipment at mim.
                              Metal oxidizes and that's kinda what rust is after time. It's good to read up on & understand as it relates to metal.
                              If u do any blacksmith work it starts as soon as u pull a piece of metal out of forge. U can hv scale by the time u hit the anvil, it is by far not your friend especially if u ever try & forge weld.
                              Hope it helps.

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