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Syncrowave 250 DX, high frequency fluctuates

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  • Syncrowave 250 DX, high frequency fluctuates

    Hi everyone. I'm new to this forum. I've had a little Hobart Handler 120 forever but now I want to get into TIG. I recently purchased a Miller Syncrowave 250 DX from eBay after doing a fair amount of research into TIG welders. In the pictures it looked good, the price was low compared to other listings and the description simply said "working condition". Reason given for selling: "We updated our equiptment and need to move the old out!" So I snapped it up. I still need to arrange freight. After I paid for it, the seller sends me an email saying:
    "Sometimes when we weld alum with high frequency sometimes the frequence fluctuates a little bit,besides that everything works great!"
    When I wrote back asking for more details about this he said he would talk to his welding techs on Monday and get back to me. He also said he had another buyer if I wanted to change my mind about the purchase so no need to worry.

    What should I do? Does that sound like a component is failing or is it something I can live with indefinitely? I have zero actual experience with TIG welders. I can't even afford to pay what is typically being asked for these used machines. Forget buying new! This one was affordable. If it's 99% functional and is not doomed to fail completely, I can live with it. Or, repair it when I can afford to later.

  • #2
    Sounds to me like he doesn't know much about that machine or welding in general ... or he thinks you don't.

    I don't know what he means when he says "the frequence fluctuates" but you can't change the "frequence" on a Syncrowave ... it's 60 Hz, just like the AC power it uses, and that's the way it is. And there's nothing that I know of that can possibly make that "fluctuate."

    On the other hand, it also sounds like he's trying to give himself wiggle room for selling you a bad machine AFTER the sale was already agreed upon, which would be unethical and sends up red flags to me.

    I'd want more information from someone who knows what they're talking about, and fast.

    Comment


    • #3
      Could the guy mean an erratic arc? Not that this is related, but ...

      http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...syncrowave-350

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Helios View Post
        Sounds to me like he doesn't know much about that machine or welding in general ... or he thinks you don't.

        I don't know what he means when he says "the frequence fluctuates" but you can't change the "frequence" on a Syncrowave ... it's 60 Hz, just like the AC power it uses, and that's the way it is. And there's nothing that I know of that can possibly make that "fluctuate."

        On the other hand, it also sounds like he's trying to give himself wiggle room for selling you a bad machine AFTER the sale was already agreed upon, which would be unethical and sends up red flags to me.

        I'd want more information from someone who knows what they're talking about, and fast.
        I believe your statement the the HF is 60 hz is inaccurate. If it were just 60 hz, it wouldn't be HF.

        (High Frequency Unit : High Frequency Unit Provides High Voltage Electric Energy With Very high Frequency – 10000 Cycles / Sec. Initiates low energy Arc & ionize Air Gap. Electrically charges Air Gap For welding Current to Jump Across the Tungsten Tip & BM to Form An Arc. HF Gets Cut Off, Once Welding Arc Struck, for HF start only- stays on for HF continuous for aluminum)

        Respectfully
        Griff

        P.S.
        the HF was adjustable on the older (about 2000 back) SyncroWaves. I don't recall the range of adjustment.
        Last edited by griff01; 05-04-2013, 12:14 PM. Reason: add info

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        • #5
          Here's an update

          After speaking with his welding techs, the seller informs me that "It is functionable for all types of welding, stainlees, alum and steel", "...on aluminum settings the high frequency block is showing signs of wear." And that's all I got.

          I also realized that this machine is coming from a tool rental shop. That makes me wonder just how expert the welding techs on site are. Every tool rental shop employee I've ever met seems to know a little about a lot of different tools but is expert on none. The only way they could be knowledgable about the complexities of a TIG welder is to have been a welder previously with TIG experience. Just testing the unit in house after it is returned without knowing enough about TIG welding could easily lead to a false diagnosis.

          I'm going to take a chance on this machine. It's either that or I'm going to have to buy something totally inadequate for my long term needs just to keep costs down.

          Comment


          • #6
            Never heard of the frequency fluctuating on the HF part, but I guess anything is possible.

            Wasn't the HF adjustment on older Syncrowaves for intensity, rather than frequency? I know on some older machines (330A/BP for example), if you wanted the HF to be more intense, you could increase the HF point gap.

            Comment

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