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First time welding, miller 211

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  • AKMac
    started a topic First time welding, miller 211

    First time welding, miller 211

    Hi guys.

    I was in need of a small home shop welder. After reading the reviews I settled on a Miller 211 setup.

    These are my very first welds on scrap 1/2 plate using both push and pull while making little circles on 110v.

    My question is this. It appears that the weld is a little tall (excessive reinforcement). Is this because I was just laying down beads on a plate without a groove? Are my machine settings wrong? Am I doing something wrong? will 220v help? Or does this look normal for just laying down beads?
    Attached Files

  • Cgotto6
    replied
    Not bad at all just a fuzz of undercut on the left side, and the right weld was stopped a fuzz short of the end (assuming you we're welding right to left). Not trying to be critical, just trying to give feedback.

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  • AKMac
    replied
    Thanks for the advise. I will remember that in the future.

    I guess I should have shown this picture. It has been painted, but you can still sort of see the welds. Same thing, 1" tubing, 1/16" thick on a 1/16th plate.
    Attached Files

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  • Cgotto6
    replied
    Stacking tacks may be enticing by the look and the ease, but for any structural or critical weld it will not do. I know you are new so any practice is good, but running real beads is what you need to learn.

    Sticking auto body panels or similar together is another story though. No way to run a bead on something like that. Just saying don't think you can stack tacks on plate and have adequate penetration.

    Leave a comment:


  • AKMac
    replied
    Stack tacks, pretty much. It seemed almost easier to do a bunch of tacks together like that than just running a bead. My beads looked ok, but not as uniform as a bunch of tacks.

    I had some pretty good looking corner welds, but I didn't get a picture of them before I painted.

    Overall, I'm still having fun sticking stuff together!

    Leave a comment:


  • Cgotto6
    replied
    Stacked tacks, but glad to hear your enjoying the welder. To really lay a bead you will wanna start with 1/8 or heavier on a joint of some kind. 1/16 is gonna be a trick until you get the hang. Keep Layin wire!

    Leave a comment:


  • AKMac
    replied
    Well I did my first real project. It's made mostly from 1" square tubing about 1/16th thick. Welding a thin joint is much harder than laying down beads on a plate! My first attempt I blew right through the tube. To fix it I just let it cool down, built up some tacks, and flapper wheeled it smooth again.

    Here is a butt joint (my best looking one). It's not the best looking weld in the world, but considering that this is just a simple rack that will hold almost zero weight, I think it will do.

    I'm super impressed with this little welder. It really takes the guesswork out of welding when you know your combo works!
    Attached Files
    Last edited by AKMac; 05-07-2013, 07:55 PM. Reason: spelling

    Leave a comment:


  • Cgotto6
    replied
    Hey it's legal here in Washington, haha.

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  • Broccoli1
    replied
    Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
    Looks a bit better. On the lower pic, the bottom bead you are moving too fast, on they same pic the bead above the bottom one on the left looks pretty good. Try a joint, looks like you got the basics down. Keep having fun!!
    That should slow him down fo' sho'

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  • clint738
    replied
    Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
    Looks a bit better. On the lower pic, the bottom bead you are moving too fast, on they same pic the bead above the bottom one on the left looks pretty good. Try a joint, looks like you got the basics down. Keep having fun!!
    I was going to say the same thing about the travel speed too fast on the bottom bead, you beat me to it Cgotto6.

    When you do get some thinner plate you might try stacking beads like your doing on flat plate to help you with watching the bead tie in with your last bead and the plate. Practicing that over and over will help get your travel speed and movement uniform.

    I'd say your off to a great start. I had never used the autoset on my MM140 before I sold it since I only ran it on Flux wire (didn't have a bottle at the time).
    All I ever used was the chart settings and they really were a great starting point. Don't be afraid of using the chart setting to and fine tuning your wire speed and voltage a little here or there to really get a feel for how everything affects the beads.

    A lot of people just set the machine and then jump to projects right away without learning how things affect the bead. Its great to see you are working on your beads first.

    Keep up the good work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cgotto6
    replied
    Looks a bit better. On the lower pic, the bottom bead you are moving too fast, on they same pic the bead above the bottom one on the left looks pretty good. Try a joint, looks like you got the basics down. Keep having fun!!

    Leave a comment:


  • AKMac
    replied
    Thanks for the advise.

    To answer some questions, yes I was using the autoset feature. I tried manual settings and couldn't really tell much of a difference. I'm also using .030 wire and 75/25 gas.

    So I made a 55ft extension cord to run from the dryer outlet to the garage. Kind of hokey, but it works. It definitely made a huge difference with the heat! I'm much happier with these beads. There is a little more spatter, but considering that the plate has some light surface rust and I didn't prep it at all, I don't think that these are bad looking.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • weldonwelding
    replied
    That looks pretty good for your first time. Im actually surprised how straight they are.... most first welds and quite a few after dont look that uniformed. Get some 3/16 steel plates and practice on that.

    Leave a comment:


  • clint738
    replied
    You've got the straight part going well for you.

    I would recommend practicing on something thinner (1/8") so you can really see the weld bead bond with the material. About 1/8" is going to be the limitation of the 211 using 120V. According to the miller mig calculator 1/8" will require 140-150A for short circuit transfer.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...calculator.php

    The 211 is only rated at 3/8" single pass (using 220V), so doesn't surprise me that the beads look tall like they are cold for that thickness of material.

    That is an example of one of the precautions about mig how it is easy to lay down a bead that looks pretty even though it is way too cold for the thickness of metal being welded. You might think about making some practice T-joints and bending them over with a hammer to see how your welds hold up.

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  • BearM
    replied
    First time welding, miller 211

    Because your welding with a 110v welding machine on 1/2" steel. Too cold, wrong wire. Good looking weld though...

    Leave a comment:

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