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Type of material on 18' loader forks

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  • Type of material on 18' loader forks

    I'm wondering if any one knows what type of material they use when bulding the forks that the auto salvage guys use on their Wheel loaders where they lift the cars long ways.

  • #2
    Type of material on 18' loader forks

    T-1? Just a guess

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    • #3
      Not sure.....not really supposed to weld on them. You mean like a big Kalmar?
      Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
      I'm wondering if any one knows what type of material they use when bulding the forks that the auto salvage guys use on their Wheel loaders where they lift the cars long ways.

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      • #4
        Turbo38T
        This is the type of fork that does get welded into place, They are replacable.

        New forks cost approximately $ 5,500.00 deliverd to my door so I thought if I could find out what the material is and if they are indeed heat treated I could just have one of the local heavy plate shops burn me out a neww set.

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        • #5
          It has been my experience in over 35 years in the Heavy/Highway industry that once these forks are "sprung" or bent/damaged, they cannot be repaired. Safety concerns are the major reasons. I've never seen one repaired, they replace them. They are pretty pricey and guys that bend them are usually looking for work the next morning...

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          • #6
            tuff

            the forks themselves are tuff. tuff for a reason. they can be welded(without knowing the material be repaired). my experence has taught me that a 11018 is very good. also maybe a 9018 b2L?
            the steel must be pre- heated and then post heated. this will alow the steel to heat up and cool down slowley. that is the key. this steel is tuff and it can crack or deform if cooled to fast. it has a lot to do with the stickness of the steel as well. keep it about 400 f and alow it to cool 100 f per hr,for every inch of thickness.
            there is a long story on type of steel,but ,remenber it's not the same as the steel in a high rise.
            hope it helps.

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            • #7
              These are typically fabricated from AISI 8620. I to do root cause failure analysis on some Hyster units a few years ago.

              -Chris

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              • #8
                I welded them 30 years ago for my uncles sawmill. They would break in the winter from prying frozen logs that were stuck to the ground. Most of his were 3" thick and 7-8" wide. He would say just weld it and i will order a new one. Then in 2 years he would bring it back broke again. They never broke on the repaired area but right next to it. Had they been heat treated after welding properly they prob would still be using them. I cut the area down to a 45 with the torch and filled it up with 7018. It took quite a while to fill the big vee. Learned lots from doing them but today i won't weld them...Bob

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