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Notcher for milling machine?

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  • Notcher for milling machine?

    Can anyone recommend a good tubing notcher attachment for my small 3 in 1 Smithy lathe/milling machine?

  • #2
    Shouldn't need one for a mill. Just put in the right size end mill, or hole saw. Clamp the tube, tilt the head to the right angle and notch away. I have done hundreds of tube copes using this method. Used with a level, and a scrap piece of tube you can turn the piece over and accurately cope both ends.

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    • #3
      Take a look at these.

      http://www.jd2.com/t-notchercomparison.aspx

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tackit:306354
        I bought one similar to the tn 100. I got mine through baileigh industrial and was really surprised at how well it worked. I have made over 3000 copes on 1 1/2' sch 40 and it is still holding up. I used it with my drill press and found that with plenty of cutting oil the hole saws last alot longer with it on a higher rpm rather than slower. I started out at 150rpm and ended up using it on 540rpm. I recently got a coper for my ironworker so the only time i use the hole saw is for copes at an angle.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by weldonwelding View Post
          I bought one similar to the tn 100. I got mine through baileigh industrial and was really surprised at how well it worked. I have made over 3000 copes on 1 1/2' sch 40 and it is still holding up. I used it with my drill press and found that with plenty of cutting oil the hole saws last alot longer with it on a higher rpm rather than slower. I started out at 150rpm and ended up using it on 540rpm. I recently got a coper for my ironworker so the only time i use the hole saw is for copes at an angle.
          3000 copes is a lot copes, what was you working on and what kind of iron worker do you have Weldon? I always wished I could buy one but it's a big ticket item for a hobby shop like mine.

          I read somewhere that roughing in mills work good in a lath setup I don't know why they wouldn't work for a notcher. I use a cutting lubricant made by Walter on just about all my long cuts and drilling, it's orange colored paste, they came out with a new kind but I haven't tried it yet, other companies make their version of it too. I even put it on my metal cutting circular saw blade, my WS told me about it, I won't work without the stuff now. The WS told me you can drill with a dull drill with it but I haven't tried it. Do you sharpen your own drill bits? I have an older Drill Doctor I use. it works really well, pretty fast too..

          Walter brand cutting paste

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tackit:306376
            Originally posted by weldonwelding View Post
            I bought one similar to the tn 100. I got mine through baileigh industrial and was really surprised at how well it worked. I have made over 3000 copes on 1 1/2' sch 40 and it is still holding up. I used it with my drill press and found that with plenty of cutting oil the hole saws last alot longer with it on a higher rpm rather than slower. I started out at 150rpm and ended up using it on 540rpm. I recently got a coper for my ironworker so the only time i use the hole saw is for copes at an angle.
            3000 copes is a lot copes, what was you working on and what kind of iron worker do you have Weldon? I always wished I could buy one but it's a big ticket item for a hobby shop like mine.

            I read somewhere that roughing in mills work good in a lath setup I don't know why they wouldn't work for a notcher. I use a cutting lubricant made by Walter on just about all my long cuts and drilling, it's orange colored paste, they came out with a new kind but I haven't tried it yet, other companies make their version of it too. I even put it on my metal cutting circular saw blade, my WS told me about it, I won't work without the stuff now. The WS told me you can drill with a dull drill with it but I haven't tried it. Do you sharpen your own drill bits? I have an older Drill Doctor I use. it works really well, pretty fast too..

            Walter brand cutting paste

            I used it on the irrigation bridges in my pictures. I do at least 30 every year for the past 3yrs. My iron worker is a uni hydro 3 station 30ton. It will punch 3/4 thru 1" steel. Its a smaller one but it does what I need it to do.. I bought it mostly for the punch. I have used that stuff a couple times.. it works pretty nice but its expensive. I learned how to sharpen drill bits on a bench grinder or belt sander from a old timer machinist when I was just a kid and been doing it since

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            • #7
              That's a nice Iron worker. If I was looking to buy one I would check into them.

              http://www.ebay.com/itm/UNI-HYDRO-IR...-/120898417304

              I never could do the drill sharpening thing on a grinder, I get frustrated every time I try.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tackit:306382
                That's a nice Iron worker. If I was looking to buy one I would check into them.

                http://www.ebay.com/itm/UNI-HYDRO-IR...-/120898417304

                I never could do the drill sharpening thing on a grinder, I get frustrated every time I try.
                Yeah their nice but expensive. This one was 5000 new... But well worth it. The customer service is awesome, I talked to the owner of the company one day.

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                • #9
                  I've never heard of a self employed who makes a living welding wish they never bought one. Is the kind of irrigation equipment your repair? There are three more new systems going in about four five miles north of me.

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                  • #10
                    Occasionally i repair them but usually just build the z pipes and i build bridges for them to go across ditches up to 60' across

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by weldonwelding View Post
                      Occasionally i repair them but usually just build the z pipes and i build bridges for them to go across ditches up to 60' across
                      Sounds interesting. They just drilled two new wells for the new systems going in up the road from me. Last year was scary dry, acres of crops were tilled under due to lack of rain.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tackit:306454
                        Originally posted by weldonwelding View Post
                        Occasionally i repair them but usually just build the z pipes and i build bridges for them to go across ditches up to 60' across
                        Sounds interesting. They just drilled two new wells for the new systems going in up the road from me. Last year was scary dry, acres of crops were tilled under due to lack of rain.
                        Now they can suck the wells dry.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          We just use an RMR roughing cutter for all our tube notching needs on our Bridgeport style mill.
                          As Sprintcar repairs are one of our main sources of work we do lots of tube notching and as the pics below show we tilt the tube in the vice.
                          This is done solely for speed of manufacture, ideally tilting the machine head is the best option but when your using the machine to make money, then time saved is money saved.
                          There isn't a faster method of coping tubes we've found and it allows easy reworking of the notch if you get the notch slightly out of alignment and need to rotate it in the vice.
                          We've been doing this a long time and the system of tube to machine orientation works for us but it may not suit others.
                          Regards Andrew from Oz.



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