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Multiple Gound Leads

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  • Multiple Gound Leads

    I picked up a large all steel welding table that will be my primary shop work surface for stick, HF TIG and MIG. Should I ground the table? Can I leave the ground leads to my welders attached to my work table while using other machines--in particular the HF TIG?

  • #2
    Not quite sure of what you are asking?? You kinda have two questions mixed into one.
    Are you asking about all the work (ground) clamps remaining attached to the table when using the other machines or are you asking about grounding because of HF interference/transmission??? Or are you asking about both??

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    • #3
      I am asking about both. Should the table be grounded (to an earth ground, not a system ground) and can I leave one machine's work cable attached to the table while using another machine on the same table. I don't want to damage the electronics in my mig and inverter tig/stick machines. I have earth grounded my steel shop building skin for HF in prep for a higher output tig.

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      • #4
        You can have all the ground leads hooked up to the tableand weld with all the machines without any problem.

        Gounding the table to earth will help eliminate HF interference with electrical appliances in the shop and office, If I remember right, Cruizer said something about wraping tyveck around the torch lead, You will need to verify that one however.

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        • #5
          Grounding

          What he said. Attached is a picture of my table. I have concurrently grounded the Passport Plus, Plasma Xtreme 375 and Maxstar 150 (not seen) without any problem. Note also that the table is mounted on rubber casters.

          By the way, I got the idea for a table made from channel from this site a few years ago. It's a great improvement over a solid plate table because it is not easily affected by warping, and if one piece does warp (as has happened), it's just a matter of replacing that one piece. Also, it allows for clamping anywhere on the table and allows me to cut plate or sheet on the table itself.Name:  482b4d58d5440188dc8e510d614e55a8.jpg
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          • #6
            I'll be looking for some channel now. Seems I remember a post about it but had forgot. I like that table.

            Sorry for the hijack

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            • #7
              Thanks for the input. Mike, that's an interesting setup. Do you use the gas bottles while they are horizontal? I am under the impression they have to be vertical (top side up).

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              • #8
                Multiple Gound Leads

                It wasn't tyvek it was zip tying the first 5 or 6 feet of the work leads together off of the machine

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mikeswelding View Post
                  What he said. Attached is a picture of my table. I have concurrently grounded the Passport Plus, Plasma Xtreme 375 and Maxstar 150 (not seen) without any problem. Note also that the table is mounted on rubber casters.

                  By the way, I got the idea for a table made from channel from this site a few years ago. It's a great improvement over a solid plate table because it is not easily affected by warping, and if one piece does warp (as has happened), it's just a matter of replacing that one piece. Also, it allows for clamping anywhere on the table and allows me to cut plate or sheet on the table itself.Name:  482b4d58d5440188dc8e510d614e55a8.jpg
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                  Table is a neat idea,but the bottle set up looks a little scary,dont you worry about the regulators getting snapped,looks like a co2 and an argon/mix maybe they are not as exposed as they seem.Diffently utilizing the space well.

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                  • #10
                    Ground it

                    Interesting to research something. Sometimes you find out that you are wrong. I had thought that it was a good thing that the secondary of the welder was isolated from ground.

                    However, according to these articles, the worktable should be connected to earth ground. They reference an ANSI standard.

                    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...d-maintenance/

                    http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us...ty-detail.aspx

                    I would note that the Miller article says that cylinders should be upright, not on their side

                    Richard

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                    • #11
                      Manisoba,Thanks for the clarification.

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                      • #12
                        Welding table and cylinders

                        With regard as to whether or not the cylinders need to be upright, I think that is only true with acetylene. It may be recommended that others be upright, but from my experience over the last 6 years with this set-up, I don't see why.

                        This table is in use 5-6 days a week and I have not had any problem with the regulators. They sit back far enough that they are not exposed to anything that might be dropped or swung. I do have to be careful, though, to keep the lenses pointed down when I am welding - otherwise they get slag pits.

                        I now have 3 bottles - argon, 75/25, and tri-mix. I have a Y connector on the back of the machine that lets me switch gases without having to disconnect and re-connect every time I switch processes.

                        Not every table is right for everyone, but this one has worked very well for my small business.

                        Thanks for looking, and thanks for the comments.

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