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Anyone gotten cracks in their shops concrete floor from using red heads

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  • Anyone gotten cracks in their shops concrete floor from using red heads

    Anyone gotten cracks in their shops concrete floor from using red heads to hold their welding table down. I'm afraid to drill holes in my 10 year old floating 4" floor for fear of bringing on cracks.

    It's only cracked down the sawed crack joints so far.

  • #2
    Mine is on wheels, so no problem. Red head don't really cause cracks unles they are very close the the edge of the concrete. If you are worried about it just use some all thread and concrete epoxy

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    • #3
      I have set thousands of wedge anchors, you should have no problems. I use them on slab on grade applications, foundations, retaining walls, etc. Everything anchored in my shop is with wedge anchors. What do you mean by floating floor?

      Epoxy is crazy expensive and I only use it if it is an engineered spec. Wedge anchors are cheap as dirt and fast.
      Last edited by Cgotto6; 04-14-2013, 09:53 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by walker View Post
        Mine is on wheels, so no problem. Red head don't really cause cracks unles they are very close the the edge of the concrete. If you are worried about it just use some all thread and concrete epoxy
        Thanks Walker, I'll look into the concrete epoxy, if I have to drill holes in the floor at least there won't be any radial forces generated from fasteners.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
          I have set hundreds of wedge anchors, you should have no problems. What do you mean by floating floor?
          Cgutto6 the pad was poured over 6" of compacted 3/4 stone and fines, it moves up and down when the ground freezes.

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          • #6
            Interesting, been building houses forever and that's a new one for me. I'm from Washington state and have never encountered that. With that said I would still just use wedge anchors and be done with it. No need to buy the epoxy dispenser ($50 for a crap Simpson one, close to a bill for a good one), and a tube of epoxy ($30+) for four hold downs.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
              Interesting, been building houses forever and that's a new one for me. I'm from Washington state and have never encountered that. With that said I would still just use wedge anchors and be done with it. No need to buy the epoxy dispenser ($50 for a crap Simpson one, close to a bill for a good one), and a tube of epoxy ($30+) for four hold downs.
              Could you recommend a size and length for such a job? I put one of those pickup truck cranes on the table so it needs to be fastened down pretty good. 500 lbs max would do it. Thanks
              Last edited by tackit; 04-14-2013, 10:22 PM.

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              • #8
                1/2 or 5/8 if you really want it held. Bed it 3 1/2" into the Crete.

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                • #9
                  Anyone gotten cracks in their shops concrete floor from using red heads

                  Rather than epoxy try pl premium construction adhesive works great I mounted a handrail into armour stone with that and all thread. Solid as you'll ever want for a table

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                  • #10
                    I wouldn't mind a redhead in my shop, not sure what the wife would think though...

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                    • #11
                      Construction adhesive will not work for this application. It is not intended for concrete anchoring. The only adhesive product designed for this is the specialized epoxy.

                      Last week I pulled out half a houses foundation anchors that some jack wagon thought he could use gorilla glue. He must have thought when the bottle said "strongest glue on earth," you can use it for anything. Gotta love non professionals making engineering calls from their hip.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
                        Construction adhesive will not work for this application. It is not intended for concrete anchoring. The only adhesive product designed for this is the specialized epoxy.

                        Last week I pulled out half a houses foundation anchors that some jack wagon thought he could use gorilla glue. He must have thought when the bottle said "strongest glue on earth," you can use it for anything. Gotta love non professionals making engineering calls from their hip.
                        Here's what I got, the tables legs on the vice side have 3/8 plates welded to them that go down into the expansion joint about 2". I used the expansion joint to keep from having to drill into the floor. The plates work great for doing twisting vise work but now with the crane on the corner of the table when holding a load causes the other side to lift up off the floor.





                        Last edited by tackit; 04-15-2013, 09:17 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Good lesson here. I called Red Head and talked to guy named Tony about what I wanted to do and he told me that they don't make a product for my application because my floor is not thick enough. So if any of you or a friend have plans to build a shop in the future give some thought to the thickness of the floor.

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                          • #14
                            Maybe you could make some removeable stabilizers that attach to the legs and extend out in all directions to the reach of the lift or build a box below your shelf and fill it with enough sand or concrete to counter-balance the lift.
                            Meltedmetal

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
                              Maybe you could make some removeable stabilizers that attach to the legs and extend out in all directions to the reach of the lift or build a box below your shelf and fill it with enough sand or concrete to counter-balance the lift.
                              Meltedmetal
                              I like your ballast box idea Meltedmetal, seems like a reasonable approach to solving this problem. Maybe using a combination of wedges, the plates and a ballast box could give a safe lift. The table comes up about three inches off the floor with the generator hanging on the crane.

                              Before I read your idea I was thinking about welding a hitch receiver to the bottom of the leg opposite the crane and build a slip in 1/2" plate I could park my tractors bucket filled with dirt on.

                              Come to think of it I could do the same thing by building a wheeled dolly for a 30 gallon drum filled with concrete. Just weld a 2" receiver on the tables leg opposite the crane and put the tongue through the drum, add concrete, and when I need it roll it over to the table and slip it into the receiver and pin it. Now I got to figure out how much a 30 gallon drum filled with concrete weighs.

                              Thanks for the idea MM.

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