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Storage of solid mig wire

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  • Storage of solid mig wire

    Is there any time limit for leaving out a spool of mig wire setup on the welder ready to weld?

    I'm only able to work on my projects on the weekends and previously with my MM140 I would remove the flux core wire and discard the wire that was fed into the liner. I didn't have a shop back then, so projects were months apart.

    ive heard that in some cases mig wire is stored in an oven to prevent rust but thought I'd get advice from those who make a living doing this.

    ill be welding pretty much each weekend for the next month or two, so not sure i want to remove the spool each time and discard the 15ft in the mig liner, but if I need to I guess I will. I just want to make sure I prolong the liner life and don't let the wire go to waste.

  • #2
    Every weekend you'll be good

    You can also throw some Silica gel packets in the compartment where the roll is, if fin you live in a very humid place.

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    • #3
      Wire storage

      Release the tension on drive rollers and roll wire back on spool. Then store the spool in zip lock bag to keep it from rusting.

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      • #4
        The 15 ft isnt much in the grand scheme of things but agree with Broc, look and see.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by GARAGEGADGETS View Post
          Release the tension on drive rollers and roll wire back on spool. Then store the spool in zip lock bag to keep it from rusting.
          That is what I use to do with my MM140 since the spools were only 4" 2lb.

          The spool on the MM252 I got is I believe 11lbs so probably 8" in diameter.

          So should I relieve the tension and zip lock it even if going a week between use?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
            Every weekend you'll be good

            You can also throw some Silica gel packets in the compartment where the roll is, if fin you live in a very humid place.
            It is pretty dry here, but I might look into the big silica packs like they use in gun safes and store one with it.



            Any of you store your wire in an oven of some sort? Know where I can get one at an affordable price?

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            • #7
              If you are using a solid wire that is copper coated, then you really dont have to worry too much about rust. Just cover it when not in use to prevent dust build-up on it.

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              • #8
                Unless you have an old shop or something you have nothing to worry about. I leave my welder totally set up. Sometimes ill go 4+ months without using it. Shoot I've had a roll of .023 sitting on the bottom of my cart for over a year and a half and it looks brand new. Only time I've heard of people having problems is if they stored the welder outside, in a moist shed, or a really old shop.

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                • #9
                  It's pretty dry here in northern Nevada. I leave a 33 pound spool of .035 solid wire on the machine for months at a time and have no problems with rust or oxidation to the wire. Living in a moist, humid area could be a whole different story and in that case perhaps previous ideas would have to be put in place. I do know that my smaller spools of aluminum wire must be kept wrapped or sealed as they will oxidize even in this dry desert area.

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                  • #10
                    Well I guess since we've been in severe drought conditions for the past few years I shouldn't have to worry much about rust. I'll just leave it setup for now then.
                    I have a miller cover over the welder and then plastic over the miller cover, so I shouldn't have to much dust to worry about.

                    The shop is less than 2 years old, but no insulation and not quite sealed up tight. This year I plan on sealing it all up with spray insulation around the seams and then I'll look into what I can do to insulate the walls and ceiling.

                    Thinking maybe bats of fiberglass insulation that I can secure in place with chicken wire since the building is already built. Either way I'll have to find an insulation that will not ignite from grinder sparks.

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                    • #11
                      I store all my welding consumables in an Old fridge in my shop.
                      It's got a 40w. light bulb on a timer 12 hours On & 12 hours Off !

                      Keeps All my consumables dry & warm .

                      .........Norm

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by clint738 View Post
                        Thinking maybe bats of fiberglass insulation that I can secure in place with chicken wire since the building is already built. Either way I'll have to find an insulation that will not ignite from grinder sparks.
                        I like fiberglass insulation but I hate chicken wire(just a personal bias) I don't know your weather, I'm way north of you, but for here I would either use heavy gypsum board with fire resistant paint or roofing tin and always a vapour barrier.
                        Humidity is a big problem here particularly since my shop is mostly unheated. When we get warm days in the winter everything in the shop is literally soaking wet and if it ain't painted it rusts and most of it ain't painted. I suppose you could always build an insulated box to throw over the welder and stick an incandescent bulb or two in the box at the floor level. Kind of like the old refrigerator idea of nfinch86. If you did that you probably should control them with a electric baseboard heater thermostat so nothing gets cooked.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
                          I like fiberglass insulation but I hate chicken wire(just a personal bias) I don't know your weather, I'm way north of you, but for here I would either use heavy gypsum board with fire resistant paint or roofing tin and always a vapour barrier.
                          Humidity is a big problem here particularly since my shop is mostly unheated. When we get warm days in the winter everything in the shop is literally soaking wet and if it ain't painted it rusts and most of it ain't painted. I suppose you could always build an insulated box to throw over the welder and stick an incandescent bulb or two in the box at the floor level. Kind of like the old refrigerator idea of nfinch86. If you did that you probably should control them with a electric baseboard heater thermostat so nothing gets cooked.
                          You know of an easy to hang alternative to chicken wire? Why your dislike for it? I'm not sure of what would best since I'm trying to insulate an already built building.

                          Do you think I would need something other than bats of fiberglass insulation? I've never messed with insulating anything, so not sure when a vapor barrier would be needed. Anything would be better than nothing right now.

                          Want to be sure I don't install something that will pose a fire hazard. When I get the building and contents added on the insurance, don't want it to shoot up the rate due to choice of insulation materials.

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                          • #14
                            I don't know what you are meaning by saying already built building but if you have open stud bays the best route is to just use paper backed bat insulation and staple to the studs. You have to cover the insulation with something, most use drywall, due to the paper backing being very flammable. The backing is impregnated with tar, which provides the vapor barrier. The drywall must be fire taped at the minimum to be truly fire resistant.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
                              I don't know what you are meaning by saying already built building but if you have open stud bays the best route is to just use paper backed bat insulation and staple to the studs. You have to cover the insulation with something, most use drywall, due to the paper backing being very flammable. The backing is impregnated with tar, which provides the vapor barrier. The drywall must be fire taped at the minimum to be truly fire resistant.
                              Shop is 100 percent framed with 8" c-purlin. Metal roof and sides screwed to purlin. Nothing wood to staple to. No insulation installed at all.

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