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  • weldonwelding
    started a topic big no no!

    big no no!

    This is the main frame of a well drilling rig with a 40' BOOM this is one of the main supports holding up the boom.. As u see before I chipped it, it didn't look too bad.... but after being chipped you can see its a very crappy downhill 7018. And on top of that the torch cuts (another no no) aren't even cleaned up. I get very frustrated at stuff like this. I have worked hard to get where I am at for other welding shops and some people think they can purchase a welder with no experience and ask questions on the internet to become a welder.. sure u can do small projects around your house but out in the real world your gonna kill someone.
    Last edited by weldonwelding; 04-02-2013, 09:52 AM.

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Those are typical welds that you get from these "low bidder" truck shops unfortunately. I pride my self on my welding abilities and it shows. I worked for a drilling guy once.....he was a smart man that made a ton of money but lord only knows how he never got his ass sued.....He used to cut drillrig turn tables offwith a torch......have them pressure washed a little, weld a 3/4 plate to a new chases......put the turntable back on and without grinding have his sons high school buddies "learn how to stick weld by welding it on with some 7/32 7018 rods he got in an auction. Did I mention there was usually a good 1/4" gap here n there?

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  • owner-operator
    replied
    big no no

    I'm new to the forum so I'll just say this, as all the seasoned hands are retiring there's a huge vacume for qualified welders especially here in Bakersfield. The problem is only getting worse. The demand in the patch has ramped up and now with this Monterey shale "discovery" oil drillers and support is moving in like bermuda. Thank god for section IV code is all I can say.

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  • weldonwelding
    replied
    Originally posted by Missouripipewelder:306339
    Right on brother, I just joined this forum, I'm a Lincoln guy, mainly because I contract for the North Dakota Oil fields. That being said my my rig trucks got a 300D pipeliner on it. I have an ESAB 150 tig/stick and a Maxstar too. I read you whole post and just misunderstood ya. That monorail projects seemed pretty cool based on the pics. I'll be putting pics up and updating my profile so if ya get a chance check my rig out, its my baby... probably went way overboard but oh well! Take it easy.
    I have a 1989 f350 that i am going to mount my sa250 on. I havnt used either one of them in over 6 months or longer. Im not sure exactly how i wana set it up yet but i definetly wana do something cool, i will have lots of time to mess with it. The truck has a flatbody and its set up to dump so what i might do is build the welder body on kind of a skid so i can slide it off easily and winch it back on whenever.

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  • Missouripipewelder
    replied
    Right on brother, I just joined this forum, I'm a Lincoln guy, mainly because I contract for the North Dakota Oil fields. That being said my my rig trucks got a 300D pipeliner on it. I have an ESAB 150 tig/stick and a Maxstar too. I read you whole post and just misunderstood ya. That monorail projects seemed pretty cool based on the pics. I'll be putting pics up and updating my profile so if ya get a chance check my rig out, its my baby... probably went way overboard but oh well! Take it easy.

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  • weldonwelding
    replied
    Originally posted by Missouripipewelder:306325
    Just out of curiosity?! Why would you weld Vertical down with 7018... not that you cant do it, I can as well but would never weld anything load bearing that way.... not bashing you but you were welding this on the derrick of an oil rig?... not a lawnmower. If that weld fails, and it could very possibly, will you write the check for the funeral of hospital bills? Just saying... To me the right way to do it, based on the pictures would have been to grind both down to bare metal and then put a few passes on up hill, if ya wanted to get really technical about it, put the first pass on, chip it, wire wheel it, and then overlap two passes over the top of it. That a way your getting a good tie in to both pieces of base metal. Hope this didnt come across rude.
    Nah... Jus came across as you didn't read a whole lot before you commented. I do it sometimes too..... Cause sometimes peoples comments are just too long and boring. Funny though, what u said is what the post is about...lol

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  • Missouripipewelder
    replied
    Oops misunderstood the post.... Sorry!

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  • Missouripipewelder
    replied
    What were you thinking?!?..

    Just out of curiosity?! Why would you weld Vertical down with 7018... not that you cant do it, I can as well but would never weld anything load bearing that way.... not bashing you but you were welding this on the derrick of an oil rig?... not a lawnmower. If that weld fails, and it could very possibly, will you write the check for the funeral of hospital bills? Just saying... To me the right way to do it, based on the pictures would have been to grind both down to bare metal and then put a few passes on up hill, if ya wanted to get really technical about it, put the first pass on, chip it, wire wheel it, and then overlap two passes over the top of it. That a way your getting a good tie in to both pieces of base metal. Hope this didnt come across rude.

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  • Sberry
    replied
    One thing I've learned no one knows better than the one under hood, and if its a job that can take someone or more than one mans life it better be 100% + Just no room for error.
    The world would come to a stop tomorrow. Millions of incompetent people work on equipment every day.

    Leave a comment:


  • gnforge
    replied
    big no no!

    Pictures are ok but they really don't give a clear picture of welds and or overall job & load. I've taken pictures of my good welds & they didn't look that good, taken pictures of bad welds & they didn't look that bad. Go figure ??
    If I'm guilty of one thing it's over building & over welding, just don't want to be responsible for someone getting hurt on my watch.
    One thing I've learned no one knows better than the one under hood, and if its a job that can take someone or more than one mans life it better be 100% + Just no room for error. I think we should trust his judgement. And I don't think the owner is going to pay to have it redone if he didn't see a problem.

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  • sturugged
    replied
    repair of frame bracket.

    Hello all, I have to comment, that there are several posters that are correct here. I do agree with weldon's initial original post , with the pictures he provided. The welds are rather crappy looking down hands. Depending on exactly where and what the joint is holding can have very important issues as to the lifespan of the frame. I also agree that there shouldn"t be any welding on the web of a frame member, but i have also seen engineered frames from manufacturers that contradict this. In a perfect world the component should have been drilled and bolted , or possibly riveted together my the manufacturer. I also realize that the world isnt perfect and most of the time additions and attachments are made to already existing frames, vehicles and equipment. Whatever needs to be attached is sometimes done hastily without much consideration to the negative affects of welding and its related heat input issues. I seem to be a bit puzzled about the sticker saying no welding to the channel or is it beam flanges ? I have seen several manufacture specs that ok this as opposed to welding on any web areas. I think most of us here would agree that taking a extra minute to dress or grind welds often can be all it takes to make a good repair that much better.

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  • weldonwelding
    replied
    Where the sticker is... is the web. Good lord man.. it seems every post on here turns to a pizzing contest. I posted this with the intentions that some could relate but I see very few do.

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  • shortarc
    replied
    Originally posted by weldonwelding View Post
    Thanks.. but your talking to probably the only person You have ever talked to that is state certified to weld on the states fleet of trucks about welding to truck frames. You do not weld to the flange of the frame... attached is a pic of a sticker that states just that on the truck that I'm working on. But don't worry, your not the first person that I've heard not know that
    Just for clarification. Where that sticker is placed is not the flange that is the face, the vertical part, the flanges are the top and bottom horizontal edges.

    But still don't like to weld anywhere on a heavy truck frame if its avoidable.

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  • dondlhmn
    replied
    Well, whatever you guys figure out is the right way to weld or not weld on any particular truck frame (and I have seen a bunch of stuff done in a bunch of ways...some ugly, but workable, some just WRONG and some right), the weld in the picture looks worse than some of the ones the newbies at the local tech college make! ( Gee, I hope that doesn't hurt anyone's feelings )

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  • weldonwelding
    replied
    Originally posted by Portable Welder:305097
    Weldonwelding, Based on this imformation that makes a big difference ( Not that you didd'nt mention it before, I just forgot )

    In the picture it just looks like a flat bed mounted on a frame so the weld would have probably held.

    First off, The bed should not be welded to the frame, It should be mounted with bolts so I hope your not welding it to the frame.

    It should have shackles where you have a bolt on each side of the rail with a top and bottom plate.

    At a minimum there should be 4 different areas where it bolts down, I suspect you will have 6 or 8 areas to remedy this problem.

    Make sure you let the owner know that ther'es a possability that the frame might crack where the other guy welded it, Even if you cut his crap off the frame has suffered damage from the heat.

    If you have to ever weld to a frame you can weld parrallel to the frame but never weld across the frame.
    Thanks.. but your talking to probably the only person You have ever talked to that is state certified to weld on the states fleet of trucks about welding to truck frames. You do not weld to the flange of the frame... attached is a pic of a sticker that states just that on the truck that I'm working on. But don't worry, your not the first person that I've heard not know that
    Attached Files

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